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Monthly Archives: December 2013

Fillet Knives Require Special Care

knife

A good  fillet knife is an important piece of equipment for sportsmen and women who want to get the most out of their angling efforts by properly preparing,   cooking and eating the fish they land.

A distinctive, long, slender blade with a sweeping line and a good deal of flexibility characterizes fillet knives. These special knives are made for the delicate work associated with filleting meat and fish, and they are a very important part of every fish and game cook’s kitchen tool collection.

Look For Flexibility and Sharpness   Notice it was said, “kitchen tool collection,” and that is where the trouble starts — in the kitchen! Of all the attributes possessed by a fillet knife, flexibility and sharpness are the most important. Have you ever tried to properly remove the skin from fish using a knife that is too stiff   or dull? Or even tried to fillet a delectable walleye and end up “butchering” it because of a dull blade?

The flexibility of a fillet knife is largely determined by the knife’s manufacturer, but a keen edge is something that must be preserved and periodically renewed by the user. Now, back to the kitchen, where most food knives are kept and where often the trouble starts.

knife2

Fillet knives come in a variety of sizes and styles
all are flexible and all need proper care

Using a good fillet knife for rough, general kitchen chores will dull it quickly and  render it nearly useless when you try to use it for its intended purpose — filleting.

Caring   for a fillet knife may involve storing it apart from other kitchen knives in a safe place where other family members won’t be tempted to use it for hacking stale bagels, or dicing carrots. Educating your fellow knife users as to the proper care and use of a quality fillet knife also will help a great   deal.

When sharpening a good knife this writer likes to use an oilstone. Most sharpening stones come with directions for their use in sharpening or “touching  up” a dull knife. The basics include utilizing a light honing oil to lubricate the stone and holding the blade at approximately a 20-degree angle, while using a motion with the blade that imitates trying to push a thin slice off the top of the stone. One then turns the blade over and using the same angle, tries to pull a thin slice off the top of the stone. Some sharpening stones come with a device that keeps the blade at the proper angle while it is drawn along the stone.

Others may use a sharpening steel or ceramic stick to restore a slightly dull blade.

fillet fishDon’t   Abuse It   Don’t forget that care should be used when handling any knife. Treat knives with respect and remember that after correct sharpening, a knife will be very sharp and its mere touch may inflict a cut.

Many anglers like to keep a fillet knife in their tackle box in order to fillet in camp or at the dock, while trout fishermen often carry a small fillet knife for cleaning and cutting their catch at streamside. Here the same principles apply. Don’t use a fillet knife to cut bait, fishing line or rope if you want that knife to stay sharp. Use a pocketknife or an old hunting knife for such purposes and save the fillet knife for food preparation.

filletMost people rightly associate fillet knives with fish, but one of the handiest uses for a sharp, flexible fillet knife involves the breasting-out or boning of the breast meat when cutting up a pheasant, duck, game hen or even a chicken. As in all filleting, you want to leave as little meat on the carcass   as possible, and again that means a sharp, flexible blade.

If you care for a fillet knife properly you may be surprised at how well it will work for you, and how infrequently it will need major sharpening.

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Posted by on December 31, 2013 in Fishing TIPS, walleye, Walleye Fishing

 

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Catching More Walleyes

How to Catch Walleye in a Variety of Situations

There are many conditions that play a big part in how walleye act, where they are located, and how they feed. One of these is the weather: When it is warm and sunny, most walleye head to deeper waters, or find underwater structure to stay cool in.

walleye weedsOn a nice day with little breeze and a lot of sun, you will generally find the fish in thick weed beds, in structure under the water, and where the water is deepest, because the water near the surface is too warm.

When there is a good wind, one strong enough to make the waves slightly choppy, walleye can be found anywhere, because the surface water will attract them with the conditions. Right before a storm or when the sky is dark and the wind is blowing can be one of the best times to catch your limit, because the walleye enjoy feeding in this weather.

Weather can play a part in locating the walleye, but these fish are unpredictable and can not always be pegged so easily. The weather can help you determine where to go and which areas to start with first, for the best chance of catching the trophy size fish or catching your limit.

An easy way to locate fish is to use a GPS fish finder, but many anglers do not use this technology, instead using the weather as an indicator of where to start their search for the fish. Falling into the wrong belief that the weather determines this every time can be a big mistake, and can cost you fish. Walleye can be found many times in areas where other anglers have never looked, and this area may go against everything you were taught about walleye, but you may end up a trophy fish anyway. No one tells the walleye where they should be, and these fish are known for their unpredictable nature.

In cooler months the walleye normally move closer to the shore and into shallower water, because the water temperature drops and the skies are normally cloudy and overcast. Weather conditions right before a rain storm or snow storm hits are perfect walleye fishing weather, and the fish really seem to feed aggressively at these times. The weather can be used to help predict where the walleye will be, but it is not definitive proof. To catch walleye, you sometimes have to think outside the box and disregard all the advice you have heard. Head for the spot that no angler will fish, even if it is a shallow bed of weeds on a hot sunny day, and you may get a pleasant surprise.

Nice 27" walleye

Nice 27″ walleye

The fish bite better in windy weather and when skies are overcast, but as many a tournament angler with a trophy walleye will tell you, they still bite no matter what the weather happens to be usually. It all comes down to giving them what they want on the particular day you’re fishing.

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Barometric Pressure

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Understanding barometer reading to fish by

The effect of barometric pressure on fishing feeding activity is one of the more interesting theories. In short,  the theory proposes that a dropping air pressure brings on feeding activity, rising pressure turns the fish off feeding, high pressure results in the fish moving to shallower water, and low pressure results in fish moving to deeper water. This article will provide an overview on barometric pressure, summarize various theories about why atmospheric pressure affects fishing activity, and then summarize in tabular fashion the generally accepted fish behaviours with various barometric patterns.

Barometric pressure is the measure of the weight of the atmosphere above us. A barometer is used to measure air pressure.  The earliest barometer consisted of a glass vacuum tube inserted into a container of mercury which was exposed to the pressure of the air.  Increased air pressure would force the mercury up the tube in a height proportunal to the pressure. The height was measured in inches (inHg) or in millibars (1 inch = 33.864 millibars). Although new types of barometers are now used, these measures are still in place. In general, 30 inHg or 1016 millibars is considered to be normal air pressure. In normal weather, 30.5 is considered extreme high, and 28.5 is considered extreme low. The measures are taken at sea level, a higher elevation has less atmosphere above it, so a correction factor against the normal measure is needed depending on altitude.

It is believed that the effect of barometric pressure is greater in shallow water than deep, probably due to the pressure of the weight of the water in deep water being so high, that the air pressure above it is not relatively significant.

There are many useful gadgets on the market that can help the fisherman today.

There are many useful gadgets on the market that can help the fisherman today.

The principal theory, is that the effect of changing pressure on the swim bladders of fish makes them uncomfortable or dis-oriented. In this theory, the fish will move to feel well, or they feel bloated or full. With a lowering barometer, it is believed these fish move into deep water seeking higher water pressure and ride out the low pressure around structures.  The theory suggests that just prior to change from a high to a low, fish will bite like crazy until the low hits and then stop. The difficulty with this theory, is that water is 900 times more dense than air, and generates signicantly more pressure than air. In fact,a 3 foot wave will produce a variation of pressure more significant than can be expected from a change in atmospheric pressure through a dramatic change, and the wave effect is happening every few seconds, rather than the hours or days that the atmospheric changes takes to occur.

imagesCA1344Y9Frankly, given that the pressure of water depth is such a significantly greater factor than the pressure of atmosphere, it seems likely that the weather conditions created by changes in barometric pressure, such as clouds, rain and wind, have more effect on fishing than the barometric pressure alone. So in the opinion of the author, barometric change is a good indicator of fishing change, but it’s not because of the pressure change by itself, as much as what other weather conditions are likely to occur because of the pressure change.
The following table attempts to summarize the barometric pressure, and observations on fish activity and fishing techniques.

Pressure Trend Typical Weather Fish Behaviour Suggested Fishing Tactics
High Clear skies Fish seek cover, look for logs, weeds in shallows. If water too warm, will stop biting. Fish structure close to surface, with shallow crankbaits, poppers, etc..
Rising Clearing or improving Fish start to move out of deeper water.  After a day or so, go to normal feeding. Fish with brighter lures and near cover, moving from deeper water to shallower water.
Normal and stable Fair Normal activity. Experiment with your favorite baits and lures.
Falling            Degrading Most active feeding. Range of different methods. Surface and shallow running lures may work well.
Slightly lower Usually cloudy Fish seek deeper water, with water temp maybe also slowing them down. May need to settle before feeding again. Use deep running lures at a moderate speed.
Low Rainy and stormy Fish move to deeper structures, may not feed. Fish deep structures, vary your methods.

Of course, the longer a period of high feeding activity, the more likely the fish are to stop feeding and the longer the period of inactivity, the more likely the fish are to start feeding.

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This group of six caught over 100 per day along with 55 trophy sized fish. July 2013

Draw your own conclusions on the effect of a changing barometric pressure on fishing activity. Whether pressure changes by themselves cause feeding changes may be in question, but the patterns seem to be there regardless.

‘There is certainly something in angling that tends to produce a serenity of the mind’

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Posted by on December 27, 2013 in Barometer, Fishing, Fishing TIPS, weather

 

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Merry Christmas from Us All At Wawang!

ON TARGET in CANADA

At this time of year, all of us here would like to wish all of you a very Merry Christmas and the very best for the New Year!!  

Terry & Tami

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Posted by on December 27, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

NORTHERN PIKE – SPRING TACTICS

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Northern pike is one of the most aggressive predators swimming in North American waters. Typically known for their aggressive nature, fast paced fight, and large size, they are an incredibly popular game fish, particularly in the  Canada. Although pike can be caught all year round on a variety of lures and presentations, one of the most exciting times to fish pike is immediately after ice out every spring. Compared to many other species, pike remain fairly active even in cold water. This, coupled with the fact that they have just finished spawning and are beginning to feed aggressively, makes them a terrific choice for an early spring target.

Spring pike offers an angler many techniques and presentations that allow for a variety of angling methods. Your choice of tackle largely depends on your technique. Typically, lighter pike presentations can easy be accomplished with medium to medium-heavy action spinning gear, whereas heavier presentations require medium-heavy casting or even flipping rods. Your presentation is largely dictated by the location of the fish, and the water temperature. There are times where the fish are very shallow and you can easily sight-fish them and target individual fish, and there are times where whether conditions force those fish into the adjacent deep water.

Sight fishing is by far the most enjoyable, and it requires stealth and sometimes patience to coax the fish into biting. When sight fishing, a good set of polarized glasses is a must have item. You’ll also want to be as quiet as possible while moving in the boat, and be sure to use an electric trolling motor to approach the spot. Soft plastics really shine at this time, because it can be fished fast or slow, and really resembles an injured baitfish. Swim baits in the 5-7″ range rigged weedless work well and can be swam in front of the fish, or you can hop and pause it across the bottom. Medium sized Bulldawgs are another good option, particularly the shallow models. If you find fish in the shallows and they are more aggressive, then try smaller buck tails or spinner baits. Inline, French, or willow leaf blades seem to work better than larger Colorado blades. The subtle vibration and flash are all it takes to close the deal on aggressive pike. Shallow running crank baits can also be used with great success, particularly suspending models. Use them like a twitch bait and include many long pauses in the retrieve. Baits like X-Raps work great for this presentation.   Another great option is to fish a sucker minnow on a quick-strike rig under a bobber. Simply cast it out to areas holding the pike and set the hook as soon as the bobber is pulled under. You really don’t want to give the fish any time to swallow the hook, an immediate hook set will typically land the hooks in the mouth, not in the gills or throat.

As far as tackle in these shallow water situations, spinning tackle is ideal for the spinners and crank baits, but you’ll want to throw the plastics and the bobbers with a bait casting or heavy flipping rod. These baits are typically heavier and require a heavier rod to get a proper hook set. If you’re in or around areas that hold post-spawn pike and you’re not finding them shallow, don’t be discouraged. Chances are the pike are still in the immediate area, however some variable has caused them to slide deeper. Perhaps a cold front moved in, or a strong wind has pushed the baitfish out over deeper water.

color-corrected-pike

Regardless, you have to pay attention to the deeper adjacent water. Deeper water pike fishing can be a little trickier because you have to determine exactly what depth the fish are holding in. Typically, deeper pike are not that aggressive this time of year, and so slower finesse presentations are usually needed. Luckily, many of the same tackle options for shallow water also work in deeper water, just with a few modifications. Plastics are hands down a favorite technique for deeper water. Bull dawgs and Tiger Tubes can be used as a jig or cast out and hopped slowly back to the boat. This has accounted for some of the largest fish in our annual photo albums.

Slowing down and paying attention is critical as these fish rarely slam your bait. Rather, you’re looking for a small tick on the line and when you feel it, set the hook hard. Braided line is a must in this situation. Crank baits also work well, but sinking or “countdown” models are best unless you want to modify your shallow running models to sink deeper. Again, fishing as close to the bottom as possible is what you’re aiming to do. Let it hit the bottom and give it a solid rip to stir up the bottom and dart the bait forward. Finally, spinner baits can be slow-rolled across the bottom, however it’s far less success in this technique than the others.

So now that you know how to catch the fish, where do you start looking for them in the first place? Well, pike spawn immediately after ice out in roughly 36 degree water temperature. They seek out shallow areas with emergent vegetation. Areas with an incoming creek are even better as it will typically be a little warmer and therefore hold more baitfish, and more active pike. Often these areas will have a mix of mud or sand, rock, timber, and generally dead weeds. Many times you’ll see baitfish or other species spawning in these areas following the pike spawn. Naturally, some fish will stick around while others will move out of the bays. Fishing smart, knowing the pike’s movements, and experimenting with baits will no doubt provide you with an exciting start to your open water season!

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CHASING THE ‘EYES’

???????????????????????????????More people want to know how to catch walleye than any other game fish.  Also known as pickerel, they are often difficult to locate and land. The challenge they present makes fishing them successfully an angling accomplishment.  Yet, for the novice angler finding a lake that has a fisheries management program will without a doubt help you get on those walleye quicker.  So Wawang Lake is where you’ll want to begin.

So it doesn’t hurt to have a few tricks up your sleeve when you head out on the water this season. Early season walleye are best located in shallow waters as they are not long out of spawning and are looking to stock up on feed to replace what was lost as they were preoccupied during the spawn. Shoals with gravel are excellent places to start looking, especially near the drop off to deeper water.

Quite often you will be able to visually spot them in these areas as the water is generally clearer and the walleye will stand out against the gravel bottom. In the water you are fishing, look for the edges of weed beds with a change in depth. This can be in a narrows were the deeper part of the water slopes up toward the bank, or on a bend off a point on the inside of the turn near a sand bar, walleye will be on the edge of these areas. The current is slower here and is a good place for harboring bait and acts like a snack table for feeding fish.

Sunken islands in the lake work well as do old break lines, humps and reefs. If you search the water that you will be fishing in, you should not have too much trouble locating these types of spots.  At Wawang Lake we provide a detailed, contour map of the lake that gets our guests started in the right direction almost immediately.  Supper isn’t too far behind.

Several types of baits work well for walleye. Favorites are crank-baits. Rapalas (straight or jointed) (floating or sinking) (suspending or rattle types). Next are the walleye divers, which imitate baitfish so accurately that walleye can’t resist them if presented properly.
Start using these baits with a stop motion, jerking the bait through the water instead of steady retrieves. Suspending lures are fished in the same manner, letting them sink to the bottom and then start jerking softly about a foot or so at a time. This allows the bait to sink slowly again to a predetermined depth before being tugged forward and up again. This motion represents smaller food chain species chasing and feeding which will attract larger fish and cause them to feed on the smaller fish.

Wawang catch

If fishing is more what you are after rather than angling try using minnows or leeches. Keep the leech stretched out as long as you can without ripping it.  Use a pickerel rig and hook a second hook to each. Do this by placing the second hook over the barb on the first hook and letting it trail.

Now you can hook the leech on the first hook and pull the tail down over the second hook. A bigger leech is more inviting than a small rounded one. Be sure not to have more than four hooks in total on your rig!

For trolling spinners or jigs with a larger hook use minnows and choose a medium to large minnow. Hook through the mouth, then out the gill, turn the hook then hook through the top of the head just infront of the doral fin.   This allows the minnow to swim freely and walleye often will mouth the bait, turning it and playing with it before swallowing it. Watch closely for light taps on your rod or float, and be prepared to set the hook at this point.

If trolling or cast retrieving is your preference then try using a three-way swivel on your line with the bait trailing, and the center swivel used to attach the weight. Do this by tying on about one foot of lighter line to the bottom eye of the swivel. The lighter line will break off easier in the event of a snag, saving the rest of the line. I use about four feet of line from the swivel to the bait, giving the bait lots of freedom to move side to side or up and down when retrieving the cast or trolling.
DG2

The foregoing methods are pretty much fail safe, but it remains that walleye are as challenging to fish as they are good to eat. So the best advice is to get out there and try it for yourself. Enjoy the day and the fishing will fall into place!

Join us at Wawang Lake Resort for some GREAT FISHING!!

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Fishing Walleye When it’s Sunny


hot-thermometerWhere to Find the Walleye?

Hot, penetrating sunshine and the sensitive eyes of the walleye can make for a frustrating and energy-draining day out on the water for the enthusiastic angler. Fish become scarce during these trying times and without the proper locations or techniques needed to find and catch these fish, a fisherman can quickly get depressed.

Green, healthy weeds, a handful of jigs and a technique called “dunking” are all that are needed to find success during these “dog days” of summer.

During the days of summer when the humidity and sun become scorching hot, the intuitive walleye will begin his retreat and search for cooler climates for a more comfortable existence. Although common knowledge tells us that walleye and rocks are the perfect pair, the green vegetation that is on Wawang Lake is also a preferred habitat for a walleye seeking shelter. Shallow areas are the number one choice for patterning walleye this way, and plays host to weed-wandering walleye. Water that is relatively clear and is less than ten feet deep are the most ideal characteristics to target for certain success.

Green weeds lure walleye in for a number of reasons. They provide a cooler environment, shade from the sun, oxygen, safety and comfort and an abundant food source with an added ambush point for attack. When you put all of these pluses together, you get a sure-fire plan for putting walleye in the boat.

weed diagramWhen the sun is beating down, there will be certain weeds and areas that will draw fish in more than others.  Look for the greenest, most lush vegetation that you can find. These weeds can take the form of coon tail, milfoil or a variety of other species, but they must have a base or openings for the walleye to lurk under and through. Also, try to pinpoint weed areas that are relatively close to deeper water. Walleye feel safer when deeper water is in the vicinity as it provides an escape route – the shallow weed flat, in turn, provides an ideal feeding shelf. One last thing to keep an eye out for is isolated weed clumps in the area you are fishing. Huge expanses of vegetation will hold good numbers of fish, but isolated weed clumps provide a hiding area in a vast space of “coverless” water that roaming fish happen to stumble upon and call home.

  
 

Dunk till you Drop
Dunking is a close-range fishing technique that involves lowering your lure vertically down from your boat into a weed pocket. The maximum amount of line you will use in most situations is ten feet, so be prepared to for some excitement when Mr. Walleye takes a fast swipe at your jig.

There are two ways to approach a weed pocket for dunking – drifting and by using your electric motor. If the winds are calm and you are fishing a large expanse of weeds, simply allow your boat to drift with the breeze and dunk all of the pockets that you can as your boat slowly drifts over them.

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WEED EDGE PIKE with VIDEO

pike 2Frequently you’ll see pike on weed edges that  make you appreciate the fish-holding appeal of these areas.

If you’re an enthusiast of catching pike, weed beds are one of the best places   to fish. Yet to refine your strategy even further, focus on the edges of weeds.  This area is deadly for any size pike, but it’s often the spot where   the monsters hang out!

Why Pike Love Edges   The reason pike hang out in these areas is because the advantage and what draws pike to weed edges. Hidden in the lush vegetation, a pike can hide in   the shadows and wait for prey to enter the brighter lit area outside the weed edge. Once prey enters the open area, the concealed pike strikes!

Pike also use edges as runways to cruise weed beds looking for food. A pike has the advantage when it successfully chases prey into the open water areas outside of weeds. No longer able to hide in the plant’s protection, fish   become an easy target for these pike. These are two key reason edges attract pike. To help narrow down your search, here are some things to look for in weed-edge areas.

pikeTypes Of Weed Edges   A good weed edge is an area that contains weeds of different sizes, stopping   at specific depths on a drop off. These occur on major lakes. Islands and points jutting out into deeper water are prime weed line drop off areas. No matter where you find them though, they’re definite pike haunts.

The shallower, shore side of a weed bed can also have a distinct edge. Often caused by sand or rock that prevents weed growth, these inside weed lines are good areas to work for pike, especially early in the season or on overcast   days.

Between the outside and inside edges of weed beds, other smaller edges exist. The most common ones are cuts in weeds formed by a drop in depth, or pockets created by boulders or sunken logs interrupting weed growth.

pike fishing baits

Weed edge fishing baits (left to right): an inline buck tail spinner,
a jerk bait, and a paddle tailed swim bait

Edge BaitsTo work weed edges for pike some lures are better than others.  Pike are attracted to a lure smacking the   water, or suddenly flashes, so buck tail spinner baits and inline spinners are good choices. Large, soft-plastic shad swim baits are another great lure for edges as the paddle tail puts out plenty of thump to get a pike’s attention. Minnow baits, jerk baits, and crank baits also work well on pike.

 Work these baits outside the edge to minimize foul-ups. Remember to fish these baits on stop-and-go or erratic retrieves. In general terms:

  •   Use slower-moving presentations in cold water conditions or after a cold front.
  •   Warmer water and stable weather conditions call for faster, more aggressive presentations.

Northern pike love the edges of weed lines. Remember to use leaders to prevent bite-offs from these toothy predators and opt for heavy-power rods to battle big fish. After all, when you’re working a weed edge for pike, the possibility of a trophy always exists and you’ll soon join the ranks of a master angler!

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Walleye Lures – Use and Tips

Here is a good variety of some excellent and proven lures for catching walleye.

Rapala Flat Rap

rap flat rapBalsa wood construction

Flat-sided hard flashing action

Triangle lip enhances action

Slow-rising response on retrieve

VMC Black Nickel Hooks

At first glance you’ll see similarities between the Flat Rap and other members of Rapalas Rap lure family, but then you’ll notice the difference in the flat sides and triangle lip. Although the Flat Rap has a few different features from other Rap lures, its strike drawing power is right on par with the rest of the family. Made from balsa with a slow-rising response on retrieve pause, the Flat Rap swims with a hard-flashing modification of the classic Rapala “wounded-minnow” action. The Flat Raps triangle lip enhances action while letting it deflect of timber, rocks and other obstacles. Each Flat Rap is hand-tuned and tank-tested to ensure it embodies the fish-catching action Rapala is known for.

STORM ThunderStick with MadFlash
storm deep jointed

UV Bright or MadFlash finish

Original ThuderStick swimming actions and rattle

External scale pattern

3-D holographic eyes

The Original ThunderStick with the added appeal of STORMs brilliant MadFlash holographic or UV Bright finish and external scale patters for maximum flash. Just like the Original ThunderSticks, the ThunderStick with MadFlash delivers the same proven fish-catching action, integrated lip and high-volume rattles. Whether you cast, troll, twitch, rip or jerk the ThunderStick,it will produce the results youre after in most fishing situations. Complete Premium VMC hooks.

STORM Deep Jr. ThunderStick with MadFlash
storm deep jr

UV Bright or MadFlash finish

Original ThuderStick swimming actions and rattle

External scale pattern

3-D holographic eyes

STORMs Deep Jr. ThunderStick with MadFlash offers the same proven fish-catching action, integrated lip and high-volume rattles as their classic Original Deep Jr. ThunderStick stickbait, but with the addition of a stunning holographic MadFlash finish for maximum flash. Whether you cast, troll, twitch, rip or jerk the Deep Jr. ThunderStick with MadFlash, it will produce the results youre after in most fishing situations. Complete with premium VMC Barbarian hooks.

STORM Deep Jointed MinnowStick Model DJMS Minnow Lures

storm deep jointed

STORMs Deep Jointed MinnowStick Lures suspend, rattles and entices the strike with its hypnotic swimming action and lifelike external scale pattern with holographic body and eyes. When walleye are suspended deep, the Deep Jointed MinnowSticks attract like walleye magnets when cast or trolled. Red VMC Barbarian hooks. Dives 6-10.

Rapala Jointed Minnow
rap jointed minnow

Attention-getting, baitfish-in-distress action

Premium balsa wood construction

Articulated broken back design

Classic minnow profile

VMCBlack Nickel Hooks

Rapalas Jointed Minnows are the answer when fish are extra wary and water conditions are difficult. The Jointed Minnows unique body works to produce a livelier, attention-getting, baitfish-in-distress action that usually fits the bill when all other lures come up short. Well suited for super slow retrieves.

STORM WildEye Live Series Lures – Walleye

storm wildeyeNatural color patterns

Holographic WildEye

Rigged with a superior VMC needle-point hook and treble belly hook

Lifelike swimming action

Holographic swimmin flash foil

Strong soft body with internal lead head

STORMs WildEye Live Walleye is pre-rigged with a premium VMC needle-point hook and treble belly hook. The realistic walleye color pattern and body shape makes this lure irresistible and perfect for clear-water presentations.

So on your next fishing trip up to Wawang Lake drop a few of these lures in the tackle box.  You’re in for a BIG surprise!

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GRILLED NORTHERN PIKE

Grilled Pike

Grilling adds a wonderful flavor to pike, as well as to fresh vegetables. And there’s nothing like a trip to the backyard barbecue to escape the heat of the kitchen. No pike? White-fleshed fish such as walleye also works well with this recipe.

  • Serves: 4
  • Course: Lunch, Dinner
  • Beer: Pale ale
  • Wine: All whites, Sauvignon Blanc

Ingredients

  • 6 Roma tomatoes, halved
  • 1 large sweet onion, cut into ¼-inch slices
  • 4 cloves roasted garlic
  • ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 4 6 to 8-ounce boneless, skinless pike fillets

Preparation

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Drizzle tomatoes, onion and garlic with 2 tbsp oil. Grill until vegetables begin to char (5 to 10 minutes). Remove from grill and allow to cool.
  2. Place tomatoes, onion and garlic in a food processor and pulse briefly. Add ½ cup oil and season with salt and pepper. Pulse until ingredients are combined, but resulting sauce still has some texture.
  3. Drizzle remaining oil on pike and grill over medium-high heat until fish is cooked through. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Ladle sauce, either heated or at room temperature, over fish. Serve with grilled zucchini, asparagus, mushrooms or potato wedges, and crunchy coleslaw.

ENJOY!

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Posted by on December 15, 2013 in Northern Pike, recipes, walleye

 

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