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Category Archives: Cold Weather Clothing

Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Staying Warm When Cold-Weather Fishing

imagesIn spring, fall and winter, anglers should ensure they are properly dressed for cold-weather conditions. It’s astounding, the anglers wearing jeans that are able to fish the entire day in cold temperatures.

Although they tough it out, they would be more comfortable if outfitted with proper clothing, and were dressed in layers.

Choosing the right clothing, along with accessories that will help keep you warm, is an important consideration when heading out fishing because if you’re not comfortable, you’re not mentally focused, and you’ll miss fish — it’s that simple.

Dress In Layers
A key principle to outdoor clothing is to dress in layers. Layers allow you to regulate your body temperature by adding or removing clothes to suit your activity level and adjust to the weather conditions.

A layered clothing system should consist of an inner-, a mid-, and an outer-layer. The inner layer directly contacts your skin and should fit snug. Its job is to wick moisture away from your body. This wicking is critical to cold-weather comfort because if wet clothes are left on your skin, they will pull heat away from your body.

coldAn early November shore demonstrates how conditions can turn biter-cold overnight, a good reason to bring extra clothes and dress in layers when fishing in cold weather.

The fact that damp clothes cause one to lose heat raises an important note regarding outdoor clothing. And that is that clothes containing cotton should be avoided, as this material will absorb moisture instead of wicking it.

Many can relate to the chilly feeling caused by damp clothing against the skin, and how quickly it can cool you down. Instead of cotton, look for inner-layer clothes containing polyester, silk, and wool blends.

A mid-layer is the next part of the layering system. This layer provides insulation while still wicking moisture away from the body. Fleece, wool, polyester and other synthetic blends are mainstay fabrics for these clothes. Mids come in various thickness, or weights, depending on the amount of insulation required.

mitch
Go Lighter
They are often classified as light, mid and heavyweight. In some cases, it’s better to wear two sets of mid-weight layers instead of one heavyweight to give you more layering options to regulate your temperatures.

The outer layer of your system provides protection from wind and rain. High-end outer layers (often featuring Gore-Tex) will also breathe, allowing the moisture that’s trapped inside your clothes to escape, but preventing outside moisture from getting in.

Also keep in mind that layering clothing doesn’t just apply to shirts, jackets and pants. You should ensure you take precautions to wear socks, mitts or gloves, and hats that all will wick moisture, insulate, and block wind and water.

Discussing proper boots for cold-weather conditions is a separate article on its own, but do yourself a favor and invest in quality boots. Your feet will thank you.

Survival Suits
A survival suit, which is actually a Type V (Special Use Device) PFD, is a must when fishing in cold temperatures on open water and, if you own one, should also be worn when venturing out on thin ice.

Survival suits are designed to keep you afloat should you fall in the water, as well as trap and contain your body heat within the suit. The suits are not watertight, so there will be leakage into the suit if immersed in water. However, once this occurs, the water will be warmed by your body and held inside the suit. Note: suits can only provide protection for so long. Always get individuals out of the water immediately, carry the proper safety gear (throw rope and ladders), and get into dry clothes as soon as possible.

A survival suit, or Type V PFD, should be worn when fishing in cold temperatures on open water.

As an added bonus, suits do an excellent job of blocking wind and rain. I have found the most difficult part of wearing these suits is not wearing too many layers when I’m active at the start of a fishing excursion. Otherwise, I find I quickly overheat and need to shed layers.

The best approach I’ve found for late open-water fishing and ice fishing is to wear only a light inner layer under the suit when I’m moving around (launching the boat, setting up rods, drilling ice holes, etc), but once I’m stationary for a while, I add on mid-layers to ensure I have enough insulation.

3102230Bring Extra Clothes
It’s always a good idea to bring extra layers so you can change into dry ones if needed. After a long hike to your favorite ice fishing spot and hand-drilling several holes, you might be sweating a lot, and your inner layer gets quite wet. In this case, consider toughing-out the cold for a few minutes and changing into a dry inner layer. This is especially useful if you plan on being inactive for a while.

It’s also a good precaution to bring extra clothes should someone accidentally fall in. A first line of defense against hypothermia is getting out of wet clothes as soon as possible.

Also, don’t forget to store the extra clothes in a waterproof or water-resistant bag; there’s no sense having extra clothes if they can get wet from rain or snow.

Heating Options
When out in cold weather, there are a variety of heating options available to anglers. Portable propane or gas heaters are extremely useful to anglers when ice fishing, although one must exercise caution if using these devices in closed quarters as carbon monoxide can quickly elevate to lethal levels.

ByersCold2Hand and feet warmers are also useful to have and come in various models. There are disposable ones that release heat once the contents of the packs are mixed and exposed to air. Additionally, there are warmers that use lighter fluid and can be refilled and used again.

Another simple, but effective, way to stay warm is to ingest hot drinks and meals. A small, portable stove and pot is a great accessory to prepare warm meals on a daylong ice-fishing outing. A mid-afternoon snack of a hearty soup or chili will boost blood sugar levels and add warmth to your body’s core.

Similarly, carrying a thermos full of hot chocolate, coffee or herbal tea will help keep you warm. It is also important to ensure you stay hydrated when outdoors; dehydration will undermine many of your body’s natural functions to stay warm, so drink plenty of fluids throughout the day.

Having the proper clothing is crucial to comfort and safety when cold-weather fishing. Not only will using a layering system and bringing some portable heating options keep you cozy while fishing, but staying comfortable keeps you mentally alert and ready to set the hook. If you’re chilled and frustrated at being cold, you will simply not be as alert when fishing, inevitably equating to lost fish.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Join 38,127 other followers

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 20, 2016 in Cold Weather Clothing, Fishing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Being prepared will make all the difference in your next upcoming fishing trip.  Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure to Wawang Lake Resort.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Staying Warm When Cold-Weather Fishing

imagesIn spring, fall and winter, anglers should ensure they are properly dressed for cold-weather conditions. It’s astounding, the anglers wearing jeans that are able to fish the entire day in cold temperatures.

Although they tough it out, they would be more comfortable if outfitted with proper clothing, and were dressed in layers.

Choosing the right clothing, along with accessories that will help keep you warm, is an important consideration when heading out fishing because if you’re not comfortable, you’re not mentally focused, and you’ll miss fish — it’s that simple.

Dress In Layers
A key principle to outdoor clothing is to dress in layers. Layers allow you to regulate your body temperature by adding or removing clothes to suit your activity level and adjust to the weather conditions.

A layered clothing system should consist of an inner-, a mid-, and an outer-layer. The inner layer directly contacts your skin and should fit snug. Its job is to wick moisture away from your body. This wicking is critical to cold-weather comfort because if wet clothes are left on your skin, they will pull heat away from your body.

coldAn early November shore demonstrates how conditions can turn biter-cold overnight, a good reason to bring extra clothes and dress in layers when fishing in cold weather.

The fact that damp clothes cause one to lose heat raises an important note regarding outdoor clothing. And that is that clothes containing cotton should be avoided, as this material will absorb moisture instead of wicking it.

Many can relate to the chilly feeling caused by damp clothing against the skin, and how quickly it can cool you down. Instead of cotton, look for inner-layer clothes containing polyester, silk, and wool blends.

A mid-layer is the next part of the layering system. This layer provides insulation while still wicking moisture away from the body. Fleece, wool, polyester and other synthetic blends are mainstay fabrics for these clothes. Mids come in various thickness, or weights, depending on the amount of insulation required.

mitch
Go Lighter
They are often classified as light, mid and heavyweight. In some cases, it’s better to wear two sets of mid-weight layers instead of one heavyweight to give you more layering options to regulate your temperatures.

The outer layer of your system provides protection from wind and rain. High-end outer layers (often featuring Gore-Tex) will also breathe, allowing the moisture that’s trapped inside your clothes to escape, but preventing outside moisture from getting in.

Also keep in mind that layering clothing doesn’t just apply to shirts, jackets and pants. You should ensure you take precautions to wear socks, mitts or gloves, and hats that all will wick moisture, insulate, and block wind and water.

Discussing proper boots for cold-weather conditions is a separate article on its own, but do yourself a favor and invest in quality boots. Your feet will thank you.

Survival Suits
A survival suit, which is actually a Type V (Special Use Device) PFD, is a must when fishing in cold temperatures on open water and, if you own one, should also be worn when venturing out on thin ice.

Survival suits are designed to keep you afloat should you fall in the water, as well as trap and contain your body heat within the suit. The suits are not watertight, so there will be leakage into the suit if immersed in water. However, once this occurs, the water will be warmed by your body and held inside the suit. Note: suits can only provide protection for so long. Always get individuals out of the water immediately, carry the proper safety gear (throw rope and ladders), and get into dry clothes as soon as possible.

A survival suit, or Type V PFD, should be worn when fishing in cold temperatures on open water.

As an added bonus, suits do an excellent job of blocking wind and rain. I have found the most difficult part of wearing these suits is not wearing too many layers when I’m active at the start of a fishing excursion. Otherwise, I find I quickly overheat and need to shed layers.

The best approach I’ve found for late open-water fishing and ice fishing is to wear only a light inner layer under the suit when I’m moving around (launching the boat, setting up rods, drilling ice holes, etc), but once I’m stationary for a while, I add on mid-layers to ensure I have enough insulation.

3102230Bring Extra Clothes
It’s always a good idea to bring extra layers so you can change into dry ones if needed. After a long hike to your favorite ice fishing spot and hand-drilling several holes, you might be sweating a lot, and your inner layer gets quite wet. In this case, consider toughing-out the cold for a few minutes and changing into a dry inner layer. This is especially useful if you plan on being inactive for a while.

It’s also a good precaution to bring extra clothes should someone accidentally fall in. A first line of defense against hypothermia is getting out of wet clothes as soon as possible.

Also, don’t forget to store the extra clothes in a waterproof or water-resistant bag; there’s no sense having extra clothes if they can get wet from rain or snow.

Heating Options
When out in cold weather, there are a variety of heating options available to anglers. Portable propane or gas heaters are extremely useful to anglers when ice fishing, although one must exercise caution if using these devices in closed quarters as carbon monoxide can quickly elevate to lethal levels.

ByersCold2Hand and feet warmers are also useful to have and come in various models. There are disposable ones that release heat once the contents of the packs are mixed and exposed to air. Additionally, there are warmers that use lighter fluid and can be refilled and used again.

Another simple, but effective, way to stay warm is to ingest hot drinks and meals. A small, portable stove and pot is a great accessory to prepare warm meals on a daylong ice-fishing outing. A mid-afternoon snack of a hearty soup or chili will boost blood sugar levels and add warmth to your body’s core.

Similarly, carrying a thermos full of hot chocolate, coffee or herbal tea will help keep you warm. It is also important to ensure you stay hydrated when outdoors; dehydration will undermine many of your body’s natural functions to stay warm, so drink plenty of fluids throughout the day.

Having the proper clothing is crucial to comfort and safety when cold-weather fishing. Not only will using a layering system and bringing some portable heating options keep you cozy while fishing, but staying comfortable keeps you mentally alert and ready to set the hook. If you’re chilled and frustrated at being cold, you will simply not be as alert when fishing, inevitably equating to lost fish.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 20, 2015 in Cold Weather Clothing, Fishing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
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