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Category Archives: DIY

Tips For Proper Reel Care

 

Most anglers want to be able to repair and maintain their own reels. They want to know how and why they work. But let’s face it, modern reels are complicated.  These tips will help the average angler keep his reel working in good condition for many years and save him money too.

Each reel is a little bit different, but the basics are the same. Here are the elementary steps recommend to keep your reel working properly:

1. Assemble the proper tools before you begin.   You’ll need two small screwdrivers — a slot head and a Phillips — along with a pair of tweezers and an old toothbrush. If you have the wrench and parts list that came with your reel, keep them handy, too.

2. Assemble the proper cleaning supplies.  We recommend a pan of hot water, Simple Green cleaning compound, Lighter Fluid, TG’s Rocket Fuel Hi-Speed Reel Oil, Reel X and Super Lube Grease.

3. Take your reel apart properly.  When you take your reel apart lay out the parts on a mat of some sort. Put a strip of masking tape under the line of parts and number each part as you remove it from the reel. That way you’ll be able to put everything back together without having parts leftover.

4. Hold your reel properly while disassembling and assembling it.   We recommend anglers hold the reel in their left hand and work with their right. That way everything stays oriented. But the really important thing is to always hold it the same. That way the parts will go back together easier.

5. Never put metal against metal.  Never put metal to metal when working on your reel. All reel parts are designed metal to fiber. Remember that.

6. Use tweezers to handle springs and wire clips.  That’ll keep them from flying all over the place and maybe getting lost.

7. Remove or secure your fishing line before you remove the spool.   Either strip all the line off the spool or secure it with masking tape before you remove the spool from the reel. If you don’t, the line will get caught between the spool and the frame and make removal very difficult.

8. Clean parts with Simple Green.   Never use gasoline or similar products to remove dirt and grease from your reel’s parts. It’ll melt plastics. Use a biodegradable product such as Simple Green and a toothbrush that won’t hurt the plastic or fiber parts of the reel.

9. Grease gears.   Apply grease to the bottom of the teeth, not the top. Applying grease to the tops of the teeth will cause the gears to throw the grease everywhere. You want it in the bottom. Also, don’t slop the grease all over the place; a light coating is all you need. We apply it with a toothpick or a small brush.

10. Oil bearings.  Clean bearings with lighter fluid. That’ll remove all the dirt and grunge from them. After they’re cleaned make sure they spin. That’s very important because it’ll tell you they’re clean. Oil them with TG’s Rocket Fuel — medium viscosity — one drop per bearing. Again use a toothpick.

After all that put your reel back together; check to make sure everything is working the way it should, back the drag off and apply a little Reel Magic to the exterior to protect the finish and line. You’ll be good to go.

Spinning reels can be maintained much the same as casting reels. Just remember the basics — stay organized, clean properly, grease gears and oil bearings.

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A Great Solution to Cooler Ice

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Getting ice is always a problem or inconvenience. This will show you how to make Polar Bear tubes for your cooler. These modification are to help you keep your fish fresh and chilled while saving money on ice and worrying about where to find ice when you go fishing. The cooler is shown with a false bottom to keep your fish from laying in a pool of water or blood while you are out fishing, especially should you purchase additional ice. The modification includes a strap for keeping your cooler safely closed while in transient with out the lid blowing open. The setup includes Polar Bear tubes made from 2 inch PVC pipe with standard end caps cut to fit your freezer space available to freeze the tubes.

Safety strap of 2 inch webbing with quick release buckle using screws to attach to cooler.


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First measure your freezer space to see what is the maximum length your tubes can be and see what your maximum cooler length is so you can custom fit your Polar Bear tubes. Make Polar Bear tubes from 2 inch PVC pipe available at your local hardware store. Includes a 20 foot 2 inch PVC pipe end fittings and PVC glue. When assembling, fill with water but not full (88% maximum) as you will need a buffer space for expansion so you wont bust the Polar Bear tube when freezing. Keep everything clean in case you need these Polar Bear tubes as an emergency water supply. Glue end cap on one end of Polar Bear tubes and let it setup for a hour. Fill with water to 88% and glue on other end cap. Keep it vertical so that cap can set with out being in the water.


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I made 6 Polar Bear tubes for my big cooler that are 21 inches each. Make as many Polar Bear tubes you like.


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False bottom to prevent fish laying in blood, or water should you add addition ice.


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False bottom made by attaching 2 pieces of 3/4 inch PVC pipe to a plastic sheet. Custom fit to cooler bottom. Wood not recommended.


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Polar Bear tubes. These are 21 inches as that the maximum length that my garage side by side refrigerator/freezer will take. Hopefully yours may match your cooler length.
Ok lets go catch some fish.


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Polar Bear tubes. Custom fitted for the lunch cooler box.

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Posted by on April 25, 2016 in CAMPING, DIY, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Tips For Proper Reel Care

 

Most anglers want to be able to repair and maintain their own reels. They want to know how and why they work. But let’s face it, modern reels are complicated.  These tips will help the average angler keep his reel working in good condition for many years and save him money too.

Each reel is a little bit different, but the basics are the same. Here are the elementary steps recommend to keep your reel working properly:

1. Assemble the proper tools before you begin.   You’ll need two small screwdrivers — a slot head and a Phillips — along with a pair of tweezers and an old toothbrush. If you have the wrench and parts list that came with your reel, keep them handy, too.

2. Assemble the proper cleaning supplies.  We recommend a pan of hot water, Simple Green cleaning compound, Lighter Fluid, TG’s Rocket Fuel Hi-Speed Reel Oil, Reel X and Super Lube Grease.

3. Take your reel apart properly.  When you take your reel apart lay out the parts on a mat of some sort. Put a strip of masking tape under the line of parts and number each part as you remove it from the reel. That way you’ll be able to put everything back together without having parts leftover.

4. Hold your reel properly while disassembling and assembling it.   We recommend anglers hold the reel in their left hand and work with their right. That way everything stays oriented. But the really important thing is to always hold it the same. That way the parts will go back together easier.

5. Never put metal against metal.  Never put metal to metal when working on your reel. All reel parts are designed metal to fiber. Remember that.

6. Use tweezers to handle springs and wire clips.  That’ll keep them from flying all over the place and maybe getting lost.

7. Remove or secure your fishing line before you remove the spool.   Either strip all the line off the spool or secure it with masking tape before you remove the spool from the reel. If you don’t, the line will get caught between the spool and the frame and make removal very difficult.

8. Clean parts with Simple Green.   Never use gasoline or similar products to remove dirt and grease from your reel’s parts. It’ll melt plastics. Use a biodegradable product such as Simple Green and a toothbrush that won’t hurt the plastic or fiber parts of the reel.

9. Grease gears.   Apply grease to the bottom of the teeth, not the top. Applying grease to the tops of the teeth will cause the gears to throw the grease everywhere. You want it in the bottom. Also, don’t slop the grease all over the place; a light coating is all you need. We apply it with a toothpick or a small brush.

10. Oil bearings.  Clean bearings with lighter fluid. That’ll remove all the dirt and grunge from them. After they’re cleaned make sure they spin. That’s very important because it’ll tell you they’re clean. Oil them with TG’s Rocket Fuel — medium viscosity — one drop per bearing. Again use a toothpick.

After all that put your reel back together; check to make sure everything is working the way it should, back the drag off and apply a little Reel Magic to the exterior to protect the finish and line. You’ll be good to go.

Spinning reels can be maintained much the same as casting reels. Just remember the basics — stay organized, clean properly, grease gears and oil bearings.

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Turn Soda Cans Into a Portable Camp Stove

When you’re camping, there’s nothing quite like cooking your own meals under the stars. For a handy camping stove that’s lightweight, portable and easy to make, try a beverage can stove. Made of two aluminum soda cans, they weigh almost nothing, yet can generate enough heat to boil water. These stoves are also great to have around for emergencies.

Things You’ll Need

  • Two aluminum soda cans
  • Hobby knife
  • Scissors
  • Black marker
  • Hardcover book that is about one inch thick
  • Stapler

Step 1:The stove has three components: the top section, the bottom section, and an inner wall. Find a hardcover book that is about 1” thick. Place a black marker on the book with the tip touching the side of a soda can, and spin the soda can to create a level mark around the can. This can will be for the bottom section.

Mark the first can

Step 2:Fold back the front and back cover of the book, and place the black marker on the stack of inner pages. With the marker tip touching the side of the second soda can, spin the can to create a level mark around the can, resulting in a line that is about a quarter inch lower than the line on the first can. This can will be for the top section.

Mark the second can

Mark the second can

Step 3:Lay the can for the top section on its side. Using a sharp hobby knife, cut the bottom of the can, just inside the outer rim. For safety, it is best to be patient with this step. Keep running the blade in a circle until the metal weakens and the circle pops out.

Cut out the bottom of the can

Step 4:Turn the can upside down with the hole you just cut at the top. Cover the rim with masking tape and mark 16 equidistant points. Using a push pin and hammer, punch a hole at each of these marks, and then remove the tape. The tape helps to keep the push pin from slipping as you hammer it into the can. You now have your top section completed.

Punch holes on the rim

Punch holes on the rim

Step 5:Now that the top section can is prepared, cut off the rest of the can, using the black line drawn on the can as a guide. It is easier to puncture the can with a hobby knife and then cut along the line with scissors. Repeat this step with the second can — the one that will be used as the bottom section of the stove.

Cut out the bottom of the can

Cut out the bottom of the can

Step 6:Measure the height of the bottom section. From some of the excess aluminum, cut a strip of metal that is about ¼” higher than the height of the bottom section. This will become the inner wall of the stove.

Cut a strip for the inner wall

Cut a strip for the inner wall

Step 7:Roll the metal strip so it fits snugly in the bottom groove of the bottom section. Staple the ends of the strip where they overlap to keep this inner piece at this size. You now have your inner wall.

Size the inner wall

Size the inner wall

Step 8:Cut three squares on the bottom of the inner wall to allow fuel to travel from the center cavity to the outer rim.

Cut three slots in the inner wall

Cut three slots in the inner wall

Step 9:Cut eight vertical slits in the top section up to the line where the printing on the can starts. When it’s time to connect all the pieces, these slits will help you slide the top section into the bottom section.

Cut slits on the top section

Cut slits on the top section

Step 10:Place the inner wall piece within the bottom can, making sure that the openings you cut are at the bottom. The inner wall should fit snugly in the grooves in both the top and bottom sections. Slide the top section between the inner wall and bottom section.

Assemble the stove

Assemble the stove

Step 11:Fill the inner cavity of the stove about half way with denatured alcohol. You can find denatured alcohol at hardware stores in the paint aisle. Place the stove between two bricks that are slightly taller than the stove. Your pot will sit on the bricks and be elevated above the stove.

Place stove between two bricks

Place stove between two bricks

Light the stove

Step 12:When it is time for cooking, ignite the fuel in the stove with a match or lighter. As the fuel heats, flames will come out of the holes on the rim of the soda can.

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Storing Fishing Rods in Your Garage

Love this idea for storing fishing rods in your garage – EASY!

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