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Category Archives: Fishing Equipment

Boat Trailering Tips

Here is a short video with some helpful tips and reminders so that you will get to your destination safely so that you can enjoy your fishing vacation without worry.

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Choosing the Right Gear Ratio

reel gear

Buying new fishing reels overwhelms many anglers, as an abundance of options can muddy the waters. One of the big decisions involves choosing the right gear ratio reel. Understanding gear ratios in fishing reels will increase your efficiency on the water and decrease your stress level when faced with a big purchasing decision.

Some quick technical talk

The gear ratio of a reel is measured by how many times the spool turns for each single turn of the handle. For instance, if a reel has a gear ratio of 6.4:1, every time you turn the handle, the spool inside turns exactly 6.4 times.

As a result, a reel with a gear ratio of 5.1:1 is going to be a much slower reel than one with a 7.1:1 gear ratio—the spool of a 5.1:1 reel will spin 5.1 times with each handle turn, while the 7.1:1 spool will turn 7.1 times with each handle turn.

It also helps to know the IPT of a reel or Inches per Turn. This is a measure of how much line is retrieved into the reel with a single handle turn. It can also mean a gear ratio reel that claims to be the fastest may really be the same as other high speed reels.

Because spool size, depth and width can impact IPT, just because a reel is 7.3:1 or 8:1 doesn’t necessarily mean it reels in more line per turn than a 7.1:1 reel– it also depends on the spool and line size.

Uses for a low gear ratio reel | 5.1:1 thru 5.4:1

•    Deep crankbaits
•    Big swimbaits
•    Deep water spinnerbaits

A lower gear ratio reel is ideal for big baits that pull a lot, such as deep crankbaits. These reels have the highest amount of torque, allowing you to put less effort into retrieving the bait and more energy towards finding the fish.

These reels are also great for slow rolling big, heavy baits such as spinnerbaits and swimbaits. In cold water when bass are especially wary, a slow gear ratio is perfect for these slower, non-threatening presentations. A slow reel also aids in keeping these baits in the strike zone longer, which can prove invaluable when fishing moving baits in deep water.

Uses for a medium gear ratio reel | 6.1:1 thru 6.4:1

•    Squarebill crankbaits
•    Medium depth crankbaits
•    Shallow spinnerbaits
•    Shallow castable umbrella rigs

These reels are great for multiple techniques and presentations, making them very popular among northern pike anglers. Whether you’re plowing through nasty cover with a squarebill during the prespawn or bombing spinnerbaits on shallow flats in the fall, a medium gear ratio reel will do the job.

Many prefer a 6.4:1 reel whenever using anything that triggers a reaction strike. The extra speed will let you fish the bait quickly, forcing the most aggressive fish to react. Conversely, opt for a 6.1:1 reel when fishing crankbaits that run in 8- to 14-foot range. The small decrease in speed helps keep them in the strike zone longer, while still maintaining enough speed to solicit a reaction strike and giving me added torque.

Uses for a high gear ratio reel | 7.1:1 thru 8.1:1

•    Jigs and big worms
•    Shaky heads
•    Texas rigs
•    Carolina rigs
•    Topwaters
•    Jerkbaits
•    Lipless crankbaits

If you’re fishing any lure that you primarily work with your rod, a high gear ratio reel is the way to go. You’re often pulling the bait with your rod tip, but you need to have the ability to quickly take up your slack when you get a bite. A fast reel also helps when fighting a big walleye—you need all the speed you can get in order to quickly pull it away from any line-fraying hazards.

Topwaters, jerkbaits, jigs, plastics and even lipless crankbaits warrant the use of a high speed reel. These techniques create a lot of slack in your line, and if you get bit 30 yards away from the boat, a high gear ratio comes in handy for getting a solid hookset.

Choosing the right gear ratio reel can be a bit confusing, but with some basic understanding of what the numbers really mean, it gets much easier to understand. When purchasing your next reel, try to keep things simple by remembering this simple gear ratio guide.

reels

 Left to Right: Abu Garcia MGX, Abu Garcia Revo SX, Lew’s Pro Team, Lew’s BB-1

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Fishing Gear Checklist

Being prepared will make all the difference in your next upcoming fishing trip.  Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure to Wawang Lake Resort.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

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Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

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TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Understanding Your REEL

spincast2 Spin Cast Reel:  The spincasting reel is also known as a closed face reel because the spool and line are beneath the spool cover.  A simple press of the line release button and a flick of the wrist is pretty much all it takes to cast with this type of reel.  This is why spincast reel is probably the reel you started with as a kid.
Pros: This reel is a great teaching tool for anyone learning how to fish as it is by far the easiest reel to use.  As well the fact that it’s inexpensive gives you the flexibility of starting a kid out in fishing without breaking the bank on a hobby they may eventually cast aside.

Cons: Unfortunately because spincasting reels tend to be considered entry level reels they’re often not made for high intensity usage.  As a result many, not all, spincasting reels are not very durable as they are made of inferior materials.  As well this type of fishing reel is often not the best at long distance casting and suffers from a low hauling power which is needed for hauling big fish out of heavy cover like lilly pads and submerged vegetation.

spinreel2Spinning Reel:  Spinning reels are probably the more widely used reels due to the relative ease of use as well as there moderate expense.  Spinning reels are also known as open faced reels because the spool and majority of the moving parts are located externally rather than behind a spool cover.  This makes the spinning reel ideal for surf fishing where there is a high likelihood of the reel getting wet with either fresh or saltwater.  The “open face” makes most parts of cleaning much easier than with other reel types.

Quick Tip: When picking spinning reels some tend to opt for reels with front drag systems rather than rear drags.  As the front drag has large washers that exert force on a flat surface which makes the front drag system smoother than the rear.  Where as the rear drag pushes against the drive shaft of the reel which has a smaller surface area.

Pros:  Overall the pros of using spinning reels are as follows.
1. You can get a decent spinning reel for a moderate price.
2.  Due to their open spool design spinning reels tend to hold more line that the other reel types.
3.  Spinning reels are relatively easy to use and are easy to learn to use.
4.  They are great for casting long distances and are very accurate with practice.
5.  Spinning reels are great reels when using light baits.
6.  Not prone to birds nest.

Cons:  The cons of spinning reels are as follows.
1.  Spinning reels are prone to line twist unlike baitcasters which are prone to birds nest.
2.  Spinning reels come in very limited gear ratios which limits your options for reel speeds.
3.  Unfortunately spinning reels are not powerhouses like their baitcasting cousins.  Because spinning reels actually wrap line on the stationary spool upon retrieval rather than the spool spinning hauling the line on like a wench, spinning reels are limited when it comes to hauling power.

baitcast2Baitcasting Reel:
Baitcasting reels are quickly becoming just as widely used as spinning reels.  Where in the past you mostly saw more experienced and pro anglers using baitcasting reels now there isn’t a day that I’m out on my local pond harrassing the bass and there isn’t at least one other person out there using a baitcaster.

This is because more and more people are recognizing the benefits of using a baitcaster.

Pros: The pros and cons of using baitcasting reels are as follows.
1.  Baitcasting reels are wenches, of the different types of reels baitcasters have the most hauling power.
2.  Baitcasters work very well with heavier baits.
3.  Baitcasting reels offer many more gear ratios (retrieval speeds) so choosing the gear ratio that’s more fitting for specific baits is far easier.
4.  Baitcasting reels also have very smooth drag systems.
5.  Baitcasting reels work great with heavier lines and super lines like braid.

Cons:  The cons of using baitcasting reels are as follows.
1.   Baitcasters are the most difficult reels to use easily getting birds nest on bad cast.
2.  Because of the steep learning curve with baitcasters it takes a bit more practice to be able to make longer cast.
3.  Baitcasters are not the best choice for lighter baits.
4.  As said before baitcasters are prone to getting birds nests in the line upon casting if not thumbed correctly
5.  Prices of bait casters can easily surpass a budget friendly place for the average person who doesn’t fish that often.

Overall the different types of fishing reels are then to aid in different ways.  No one reel type is better than the other however they all just have different purposes.  As well with the technological progressions being made fishing reels are all being made with lighter and stronger materials as technology improves.  So choose wisely when choosing your next fishing reel and enjoy it for all it’s worth.

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Storing Fishing Rods in Your Garage

Love this idea for storing fishing rods in your garage – EASY!

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Boat Trailering Tips

Here is a short video with some helpful tips and reminders so that you will get to your destination safely so that you can enjoy your fishing vacation without worry.

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Choosing the Right Gear Ratio

reel gear

Buying new fishing reels overwhelms many anglers, as an abundance of options can muddy the waters. One of the big decisions involves choosing the right gear ratio reel. Understanding gear ratios in fishing reels will increase your efficiency on the water and decrease your stress level when faced with a big purchasing decision.

Some quick technical talk

The gear ratio of a reel is measured by how many times the spool turns for each single turn of the handle. For instance, if a reel has a gear ratio of 6.4:1, every time you turn the handle, the spool inside turns exactly 6.4 times.

As a result, a reel with a gear ratio of 5.1:1 is going to be a much slower reel than one with a 7.1:1 gear ratio—the spool of a 5.1:1 reel will spin 5.1 times with each handle turn, while the 7.1:1 spool will turn 7.1 times with each handle turn.

It also helps to know the IPT of a reel or Inches per Turn. This is a measure of how much line is retrieved into the reel with a single handle turn. It can also mean a gear ratio reel that claims to be the fastest may really be the same as other high speed reels.

Because spool size, depth and width can impact IPT, just because a reel is 7.3:1 or 8:1 doesn’t necessarily mean it reels in more line per turn than a 7.1:1 reel– it also depends on the spool and line size.

Uses for a low gear ratio reel | 5.1:1 thru 5.4:1

•    Deep crankbaits
•    Big swimbaits
•    Deep water spinnerbaits

A lower gear ratio reel is ideal for big baits that pull a lot, such as deep crankbaits. These reels have the highest amount of torque, allowing you to put less effort into retrieving the bait and more energy towards finding the fish.

These reels are also great for slow rolling big, heavy baits such as spinnerbaits and swimbaits. In cold water when bass are especially wary, a slow gear ratio is perfect for these slower, non-threatening presentations. A slow reel also aids in keeping these baits in the strike zone longer, which can prove invaluable when fishing moving baits in deep water.

Uses for a medium gear ratio reel | 6.1:1 thru 6.4:1

•    Squarebill crankbaits
•    Medium depth crankbaits
•    Shallow spinnerbaits
•    Shallow castable umbrella rigs

These reels are great for multiple techniques and presentations, making them very popular among northern pike anglers. Whether you’re plowing through nasty cover with a squarebill during the prespawn or bombing spinnerbaits on shallow flats in the fall, a medium gear ratio reel will do the job.

Many prefer a 6.4:1 reel whenever using anything that triggers a reaction strike. The extra speed will let you fish the bait quickly, forcing the most aggressive fish to react. Conversely, opt for a 6.1:1 reel when fishing crankbaits that run in 8- to 14-foot range. The small decrease in speed helps keep them in the strike zone longer, while still maintaining enough speed to solicit a reaction strike and giving me added torque.

Uses for a high gear ratio reel | 7.1:1 thru 8.1:1

•    Jigs and big worms
•    Shaky heads
•    Texas rigs
•    Carolina rigs
•    Topwaters
•    Jerkbaits
•    Lipless crankbaits

If you’re fishing any lure that you primarily work with your rod, a high gear ratio reel is the way to go. You’re often pulling the bait with your rod tip, but you need to have the ability to quickly take up your slack when you get a bite. A fast reel also helps when fighting a big walleye—you need all the speed you can get in order to quickly pull it away from any line-fraying hazards.

Topwaters, jerkbaits, jigs, plastics and even lipless crankbaits warrant the use of a high speed reel. These techniques create a lot of slack in your line, and if you get bit 30 yards away from the boat, a high gear ratio comes in handy for getting a solid hookset.

Choosing the right gear ratio reel can be a bit confusing, but with some basic understanding of what the numbers really mean, it gets much easier to understand. When purchasing your next reel, try to keep things simple by remembering this simple gear ratio guide.

reels

 Left to Right: Abu Garcia MGX, Abu Garcia Revo SX, Lew’s Pro Team, Lew’s BB-1

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Tags: , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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All About Fishing Equipment

The more we know and understand about our fishing equipment, the better prepared we are when it comes time to rely on it. This insight also allows us to make informed buying decisions.

Here is some advice for getting a handle on baitcast reels, electric trolling motors, and drift socks.

Narrowing Down Gear Ratios
Bait Baitcaster_Combocast reels are designed to provide either power or speed. Since we face multiple scenarios throughout a day of fishing, uncovering the facts on gears can make our life on the water much easier and more productive.

An example of a gear ratio is 6.4:1. The last number represents one complete turn of the reel handle — the first describes how many times the spool rotates. In this case, it’s 6.4 spool revolutions for each crank of the handle.

High gear ratios (7.1:1) are built for speed. Line can be retrieved quickly and efficiently. A reel of this style works best for fast presentations, such as burning spinnerbaits and lipless crankbaits, or when working areas that require quick pitches or flips to specific spots, such as docks, cane or weed clumps.

Consider the fishing techniques you will be using when deciding on the best gear ratio — 6.4:1 is a great “everyday” reel configuration.

Low gear ratios (5.4:1) signify power. Effort and line retrieval are greatly reduced when reeling, making it a good choice when tossing high resistance lures, namely deep diving crankbaits or oversized spinnerbaits. Swimbaits are another application that can be worked more effectively with a lower gear ratio reel.

A baitcast reel sporting a ratio of 6.4:1 is your best bet for reaping the rewards of both power and speed. It’s the “all purpose” model in the baitcast world.

For a fine assortment of Bait cast Reels, CLICK HERE

217315_tsA Matter Of Thrust
When it comes to electric trolling motors, thrust is defined as: “The power rating of an electric trolling motor that is measured in pounds.”

A trolling motor is an indispensable piece of equipment for those serious about fishing. Choose the wrong “thrust,” however, and you might as well be treading water.

Here are five simple rules for narrowing down the correct thrust:

1. You will need a minimum of five pounds of thrust for every 350 pounds of load. This latter figure includes boat, equipment, gas, and people.

Choose the most thrust that you can afford — it will definitely save you money over the long haul.

2. A boat measuring 14 feet in length requires 32 pounds of minimum motor thrust under “normal” fishing situations; that jumps to 55 pounds of thrust for an 18-foot boat.

3. Those who fish in adverse conditions — big water, high winds, heavy vegetation, long hours — should choose a thrust rating considerably higher than those recommended.

4. Buy as much power as you can afford — within reason. Lowering speed/power is always possible with a high-thrust motor — upgrading power on an undersized unit is not.

5. Don’t cut corners. A higher thrust motor may cost more initially, but the extended life (no need to upgrade) and lack of frustrations are definitely priceless.

For a fine assortment of Electric Trolling Motors, CLICK HERE


Drift Socks — One Size Doesn’t Fit All
A drift sock is a large, oval shaped “sock” that is lowered over the side of the boat in order to slow speed, and effectively work structure areas. It is a must for walleye anglers and flats fishermen. But for anyone that abhors the thought of fishing in the wind, the drift sock is a definite savior!

Drift socks should be part of the arsenal for all walleye anglers.

When it comes to choosing a sock, keep in mind some recommendations for size:

* Boats to 14 feet long — 26 inches

* Boats to 16 feet — 30 inches

* Boats 14- to 18 feet — 38 inches

* Boats 16- to 22 feet — 44 inches or 48 inches

* Boats 18- to 22 feet — 56 inches

drift-sock-258x300Much like I mentioned with the trolling motors, it is best to upgrade one sock size to give you that extra slowing power you may need, especially if you work the boat in high winds or areas with strong current.

Another bit of advice is to purchase two drift socks for the boat. These can be useful when the wind is really blowing, and with one tied to the bow and one on the stern, drift control can be better managed and adjusted.

Choose a sock that is manufactured from reinforced nylon — it will stand up to the abuse, and not leave you “stranded” on a blustery afternoon.

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Posted by on November 10, 2013 in Boating, Fishing Equipment, Fishing TIPS

 

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