RSS

Category Archives: FLOATS

Important Boating Tools

Boating demands a certain amount of gear for safety reasons, and to be ready for emergency repairs. To ensure you’re well prepared for the season, here are some essential boating tools and gear you should own.
boat-trailering

Towing Tools

You should always carry a towing kit for roadside repairs. It should include extra trailer light bulbs and fuses, a spare tire, jack, chocks, and tools.

towing_kitFrequently check trailer tires for wear. Top up air pressure and lubricate wheel bearings on a regular basis; having a grease gun and portable air compressor makes quick work of these duties. When leaving home or the launch, fasten tie-down and winch straps to the boat and inspect them regularly for wear (carry spares too in your kit). Lastly, secure items, such as oars and gas tanks, so they don’t move during travel.

Keep a tire pressure gauge in your boat and check your trailer and vehicle tires regularly for proper inflation.

Safety Gear
An important element of boat organization is proper safety equipment placement. A fire extinguisher is useless buried beneath a pile of items; it should always be within reach. It’s the same for PFDs and other safety gear, such as flares, whistles, throw ropes, etc. Also, learn to neatly loop rope to avoid tangles. Always check state safetyand national requirements for mandatory boating accessories based on the size of vessel or water you’re fishing.

Other Essential Supplies
Piggybacking on the above safety items, I also recommend storing the following in your boat: first-aid kit, bug spray, sunscreen, spare sunglasses, various medications (to handle allergies, motion sickness, headaches, etc.), an emergency hook remover kit, a few water bottles and snacks, such as nuts and granola or energy bars. I keep these in various Ziploc-style bags stored within a sealed, plastic tote for extra water protection. Label plastic totes with permanent black marker for quick identification.

 

A Proper Supply Of Boat Tools
Just like safety items, you should also carry a tool kit (screwdriver, ratchet sets, pliers, etc.) for any on-the-water repairs you might need to perform. I carry a spare prop, pins, spark plugs, and oil for my main motor and the first two items in this list for my electric one.

I also have a small plastic tote for miscellaneous items that have served me well over the years. It contains electrical tape, a knife, zip ties, plastic bags, a spare flashlight and batteries, absorbent towel, and plenty of spare fuses. Jumper cables are also good to have in case you need to boost your boat’s cranking battery. In the past two years I’ve seen this happen three times, all in different boats. This happens more than many of us would like to admit, so spend the $20 and keep “jumpers” in your boat.

C-R-toolsHave Release Tools At The Ready

When practicing catch and release, having the proper tools within reach is critical to getting fish back in the water quickly with minimal stress. Plus, the faster you can properly land and release a fish, the sooner you can catch another one! This begins by keeping your net easily accessible. Next, have a designated spot, compartment, or holder for pliers, hemostats, a hook disgorger, jaw spreaders, line cutters, scissors, and scale. Also, keep a golf or utility towel within reach to dry off hands afterwards; this prevents fingers from getting chilled in cold weather. You can buy mounts to hold these items.

Be sure to replenish supplies throughout the season. Carrying the above tools will ensure you’re prepared for a variety of minor and more serious boating situations.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Floats & Bobbers with VIDEO

1271444396vo19WMBobbers, corks, floats… depending upon where you come from, fishermen have different names for the buoyant device that suspends a bait below the surface. But no matter where you go in North America or what you call it, the revered bobber rig is one of the most popular presentations in fishing. And deadly too!

There’s a magic and significance to bobber fishing. The sight of that float twitching, popping, or shooting down like a missile in reverse is one of the most exciting experiences in fishing – no matter what you’re fishing for. Best of all, bobber fishing is one of the easiest approaches to the sport. However, there are some tips and tricks to bobber fishing that can help you put more fish in the boat.

Slip Bobbers
Most anglers in America use fixed floats almost all the time. But there are certain applications where slip bobbers are critical. In case you’re not familiar with what a slip bobber is, let me explain. With a slip rig, the bobber has a hollow ferrule through its center that allows the line to slide through it effortlessly. A “bobber stop” is affixed to the line above the float (along with a stopper bead). You can set the stop anywhere on the line that you want, so you can effectively cast and fish at any depth. It’s important to use monofilament line with this set-up, instead of braid. Braided “super lines” are very slippery and don’t allow the bobber stop to “bite” very well.

traditional-bobber-rig1Let’s say you have walleyes or whatever species located on a deep-water hump that’s 26 feet deep. Set your bobber stop to 25 feet and presto, your bait hangs a foot off the bottom right in front of the fish’s nose. The typical bait used in a slip bobber presentation is a jig or plain hook tipped with live bait (minnows, leeches, crawlers, etc.).

When you make a cast, your bait will fall vertically to the location of the float. Since many species, like walleye, like to hit a bait on-the-drop, pay attention to your line as the bait sinks. If your float is set at 25 feet, and the line suddenly stops coming off your spool at 10 feet, then something has intercepted it on the way down. Reel up the slack and set the hook when this happens.

Another great slip bobber presentation, because of the way the bait drops vertically, is to use the rig for fishing pockets in heavy cover. Spot a little clearing in some cabbage, pads, reeds or whatever and pitch the cast on the spot. Your bait will fall straight down and hopefully there will be a game fish waiting there at that ambush point.


We’ve all used those classic, round, red & white clip-on bobbers, right? They float, so they do the job. But there are other bobbers in the store that can do a whole lot more for you. One such float style is what we call the “pencil bobber”. This is a favorite style for situations where a fixed bobber works best, which is typically af_1_2_pencil_5_1_2_springwhen fishing for smaller fish. Why? Because smaller fish like perch will bite one of two ways: sometimes they’ll pull the bobber down, and sometimes they’ll take a bait and rise with it.  Set the amount of weight under the long, skinny pencil bobber so it’s just enough to make the bobber float at a 45-degree angle. If a fish hits downward, the bobber tips up. If he hits it rising, the bobber lays flat on the water. Either way, you will see the bite and end up catching more fish! Give it a try.

Fixed bobbers, in my opinion, are also better than slip bobbers when fishing for spawning fish on the beds. Instead of the bait falling straight down, it falls with a pendulum motion on a fixed bobber. From my experience, this triggers strikes from

BobberManprotective spawning fish much better than a vertical drop.

You’re never too young or old to have a blast catching fish with floats. But remember, despite the simplicity of bobber fishing, there are always a few ways to maximize the effectiveness of any presentation. Go get yourself an assortment of bobber styles, shapes and sizes and experiment with them this summer. You’ll be glad you did.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Important Boating Tools

Boating demands a certain amount of gear for safety reasons, and to be ready for emergency repairs. To ensure you’re well prepared for the season, here are some essential boating tools and gear you should own.
boat-trailering

Towing Tools

You should always carry a towing kit for roadside repairs. It should include extra trailer light bulbs and fuses, a spare tire, jack, chocks, and tools.

towing_kitFrequently check trailer tires for wear. Top up air pressure and lubricate wheel bearings on a regular basis; having a grease gun and portable air compressor makes quick work of these duties. When leaving home or the launch, fasten tie-down and winch straps to the boat and inspect them regularly for wear (carry spares too in your kit). Lastly, secure items, such as oars and gas tanks, so they don’t move during travel.

 

Keep a tire pressure gauge in your boat and check your trailer and vehicle tires regularly for proper inflation.

Safety Gear
An important element of boat organization is proper safety equipment placement. A fire extinguisher is useless buried beneath a pile of items; it should always be within reach. It’s the same for PFDs and other safety gear, such as flares, whistles, throw ropes, etc. Also, learn to neatly loop rope to avoid tangles. Always check state safetyand national requirements for mandatory boating accessories based on the size of vessel or water you’re fishing.

Other Essential Supplies
Piggybacking on the above safety items, I also recommend storing the following in your boat: first-aid kit, bug spray, sunscreen, spare sunglasses, various medications (to handle allergies, motion sickness, headaches, etc.), an emergency hook remover kit, a few water bottles and snacks, such as nuts and granola or energy bars. I keep these in various Ziploc-style bags stored within a sealed, plastic tote for extra water protection. Label plastic totes with permanent black marker for quick identification.

 

A Proper Supply Of Boat Tools
Just like safety items, you should also carry a tool kit (screwdriver, ratchet sets, pliers, etc.) for any on-the-water repairs you might need to perform. I carry a spare prop, pins, spark plugs, and oil for my main motor and the first two items in this list for my electric one.

I also have a small plastic tote for miscellaneous items that have served me well over the years. It contains electrical tape, a knife, zip ties, plastic bags, a spare flashlight and batteries, absorbent towel, and plenty of spare fuses. Jumper cables are also good to have in case you need to boost your boat’s cranking battery. In the past two years I’ve seen this happen three times, all in different boats. This happens more than many of us would like to admit, so spend the $20 and keep “jumpers” in your boat.

C-R-toolsHave Release Tools At The Ready

When practicing catch and release, having the proper tools within reach is critical to getting fish back in the water quickly with minimal stress. Plus, the faster you can properly land and release a fish, the sooner you can catch another one! This begins by keeping your net easily accessible. Next, have a designated spot, compartment, or holder for pliers, hemostats, a hook disgorger, jaw spreaders, line cutters, scissors, and scale. Also, keep a golf or utility towel within reach to dry off hands afterwards; this prevents fingers from getting chilled in cold weather. You can buy mounts to hold these items.

Be sure to replenish supplies throughout the season. Carrying the above tools will ensure you’re prepared for a variety of minor and more serious boating situations.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Floats & Bobbers with VIDEO

1271444396vo19WMBobbers, corks, floats… depending upon where you come from, fishermen have different names for the buoyant device that suspends a bait below the surface. But no matter where you go in North America or what you call it, the revered bobber rig is one of the most popular presentations in fishing. And deadly too!

There’s a magic and significance to bobber fishing. The sight of that float twitching, popping, or shooting down like a missile in reverse is one of the most exciting experiences in fishing – no matter what you’re fishing for. Best of all, bobber fishing is one of the easiest approaches to the sport. However, there are some tips and tricks to bobber fishing that can help you put more fish in the boat.

Slip Bobbers
Most anglers in America use fixed floats almost all the time. But there are certain applications where slip bobbers are critical. In case you’re not familiar with what a slip bobber is, let me explain. With a slip rig, the bobber has a hollow ferrule through its center that allows the line to slide through it effortlessly. A “bobber stop” is affixed to the line above the float (along with a stopper bead). You can set the stop anywhere on the line that you want, so you can effectively cast and fish at any depth. It’s important to use monofilament line with this set-up, instead of braid. Braided “super lines” are very slippery and don’t allow the bobber stop to “bite” very well.

traditional-bobber-rig1Let’s say you have walleyes or whatever species located on a deep-water hump that’s 26 feet deep. Set your bobber stop to 25 feet and presto, your bait hangs a foot off the bottom right in front of the fish’s nose. The typical bait used in a slip bobber presentation is a jig or plain hook tipped with live bait (minnows, leeches, crawlers, etc.).

When you make a cast, your bait will fall vertically to the location of the float. Since many species, like walleye, like to hit a bait on-the-drop, pay attention to your line as the bait sinks. If your float is set at 25 feet, and the line suddenly stops coming off your spool at 10 feet, then something has intercepted it on the way down. Reel up the slack and set the hook when this happens.

Another great slip bobber presentation, because of the way the bait drops vertically, is to use the rig for fishing pockets in heavy cover. Spot a little clearing in some cabbage, pads, reeds or whatever and pitch the cast on the spot. Your bait will fall straight down and hopefully there will be a game fish waiting there at that ambush point.


We’ve all used those classic, round, red & white clip-on bobbers, right? They float, so they do the job. But there are other bobbers in the store that can do a whole lot more for you. One such float style is what we call the “pencil bobber”. This is a favorite style for situations where a fixed bobber works best, which is typically af_1_2_pencil_5_1_2_springwhen fishing for smaller fish. Why? Because smaller fish like perch will bite one of two ways: sometimes they’ll pull the bobber down, and sometimes they’ll take a bait and rise with it.  Set the amount of weight under the long, skinny pencil bobber so it’s just enough to make the bobber float at a 45-degree angle. If a fish hits downward, the bobber tips up. If he hits it rising, the bobber lays flat on the water. Either way, you will see the bite and end up catching more fish! Give it a try.

Fixed bobbers, in my opinion, are also better than slip bobbers when fishing for spawning fish on the beds. Instead of the bait falling straight down, it falls with a pendulum motion on a fixed bobber. From my experience, this triggers strikes from protective spawning fish much better than a vertical drop.  BobberMan

You’re never too young or old to have a blast catching fish with floats. But remember, despite the simplicity of bobber fishing, there are always a few ways to maximize the effectiveness of any presentation. Go get yourself an assortment of bobber styles, shapes and sizes and experiment with them this summer. You’ll be glad you did.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Important Boating Tools

Boating demands a certain amount of gear for safety reasons, and to be ready for emergency repairs. To ensure you’re well prepared for the season, here are some essential boating tools and gear you should own.
boat-trailering

Towing Tools

You should always carry a towing kit for roadside repairs. It should include extra trailer light bulbs and fuses, a spare tire, jack, chocks, and tools.

towing_kitFrequently check trailer tires for wear. Top up air pressure and lubricate wheel bearings on a regular basis; having a grease gun and portable air compressor makes quick work of these duties. When leaving home or the launch, fasten tie-down and winch straps to the boat and inspect them regularly for wear (carry spares too in your kit). Lastly, secure items, such as oars and gas tanks, so they don’t move during travel.

 

Keep a tire pressure gauge in your boat and check your trailer and vehicle tires regularly for proper inflation.

Safety Gear
An important element of boat organization is proper safety equipment placement. A fire extinguisher is useless buried beneath a pile of items; it should always be within reach. It’s the same for PFDs and other safety gear, such as flares, whistles, throw ropes, etc. Also, learn to neatly loop rope to avoid tangles. Always check state safetyand national requirements for mandatory boating accessories based on the size of vessel or water you’re fishing.

Other Essential Supplies
Piggybacking on the above safety items, I also recommend storing the following in your boat: first-aid kit, bug spray, sunscreen, spare sunglasses, various medications (to handle allergies, motion sickness, headaches, etc.), an emergency hook remover kit, a few water bottles and snacks, such as nuts and granola or energy bars. I keep these in various Ziploc-style bags stored within a sealed, plastic tote for extra water protection. Label plastic totes with permanent black marker for quick identification.

 

A Proper Supply Of Boat Tools
Just like safety items, you should also carry a tool kit (screwdriver, ratchet sets, pliers, etc.) for any on-the-water repairs you might need to perform. I carry a spare prop, pins, spark plugs, and oil for my main motor and the first two items in this list for my electric one.

I also have a small plastic tote for miscellaneous items that have served me well over the years. It contains electrical tape, a knife, zip ties, plastic bags, a spare flashlight and batteries, absorbent towel, and plenty C-R-toolsof spare fuses. Jumper cables are also good to have in case you need to boost your boat’s cranking battery. In the past two years I’ve seen this happen three times, all in different boats. This happens more than many of us would like to admit, so spend the $20 and keep “jumpers” in your boat.

Have Release Tools At The Ready

When practicing catch and release, having the proper tools within reach is critical to getting fish back in the water quickly with minimal stress. Plus, the faster you can properly land and release a fish, the sooner you can catch another one! This begins by keeping your net easily accessible. Next, have a designated spot, compartment, or holder for pliers, hemostats, a hook disgorger, jaw spreaders, line cutters, scissors, and scale. Also, keep a golf or utility towel within reach to dry off hands afterwards; this prevents fingers from getting chilled in cold weather. You can buy mounts to hold these items.

Be sure to replenish supplies throughout the season. Carrying the above tools will ensure you’re prepared for a variety of minor and more serious boating situations.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Floats & Bobbers with VIDEO

1271444396vo19WMBobbers, corks, floats… depending upon where you come from, fishermen have different names for the buoyant device that suspends a bait below the surface. But no matter where you go in North America or what you call it, the revered bobber rig is one of the most popular presentations in fishing. And deadly too!

There’s a magic and significance to bobber fishing. The sight of that float twitching, popping, or shooting down like a missile in reverse is one of the most exciting experiences in fishing – no matter what you’re fishing for. Best of all, bobber fishing is one of the easiest approaches to the sport. However, there are some tips and tricks to bobber fishing that can help you put more fish in the boat.

Slip Bobbers
Most anglers in America use fixed floats almost all the time. But there are certain applications where slip bobbers are critical. In case you’re not familiar with what a slip bobber is, let me explain. With a slip rig, the bobber has a hollow ferrule through its center that allows the line to slide through it effortlessly. A “bobber stop” is affixed to the line above the float (along with a stopper bead). You can set the stop anywhere on the line that you want, so you can effectively cast and fish at any depth. It’s important to use monofilament line with this set-up, instead of braid. Braided “super lines” are very slippery and don’t allow the bobber stop to “bite” very well.traditional-bobber-rig1

Let’s say you have walleyes or whatever species located on a deep-water hump that’s 26 feet deep. Set your bobber stop to 25 feet and presto, your bait hangs a foot off the bottom right in front of the fish’s nose. The typical bait used in a slip bobber presentation is a jig or plain hook tipped with live bait (minnows, leeches, crawlers, etc.).

When you make a cast, your bait will fall vertically to the location of the float. Since many species, like walleye, like to hit a bait on-the-drop, pay attention to your line as the bait sinks. If your float is set at 25 feet, and the line suddenly stops coming off your spool at 10 feet, then something has intercepted it on the way down. Reel up the slack and set the hook when this happens.

Another great slip bobber presentation, because of the way the bait drops vertically, is to use the rig for fishing pockets in heavy cover. Spot a little clearing in some cabbage, pads, reeds or whatever and pitch the cast on the spot. Your bait will fall straight down and hopefully there will be a game fish waiting there at that ambush point.


We’ve all used those classic, round, red & white clip-on bobbers, right? They float, so they do the job. But there are other bobbers in the store that can do a whole lot more for you. One such float style is what we call the “pencil bobber”. This is a favorite style for situations where a fixed bobber works best, which is typically when fishing for smaller fish. Why? Because smaller fish like perch will bite one of two ways: sometimes they’ll pull the bobber down, and sometimes they’ll take a bait and rise with it.  Set the amount of weight under the long, skinny pencil bobber so it’s just enough to make the bobber float at a 45-degree angle. If a fish hits downward, the bobber tips up. If he hits it rising, the bobber lays flat on the water. Either way, you will see the bite and end up catching more fish! Give it a try.af_1_2_pencil_5_1_2_spring

Fixed bobbers, in my opinion, are also better than slip bobbers when fishing for spawning fish on the beds. Instead of the bait falling straight down, it falls with a pendulum motion on a fixed bobber. From my experience, this triggers strikes from protective spawning fish much better than a vertical drop.

You’re never too young or old to have a blast catching fish with floats. But remember, despite the simplicity of bobber fishing, there are always a few ways to maximize the effectiveness of any presentation. Go get yourself an assortment of bobber styles, shapes and sizes and experiment with them this summer. You’ll be glad you did.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Important Boating Tools

Boating demands a certain amount of gear for safety reasons, and to be ready for emergency repairs. To ensure you’re well prepared for the season, here are some essential boating tools and gear you should own.
boat-trailering

Towing Tools

You should always carry a towing kit for roadside repairs. It should include extra trailer light bulbs and fuses, a spare tire, jack, chocks, and tools.

towing_kitFrequently check trailer tires for wear. Top up air pressure and lubricate wheel bearings on a regular basis; having a grease gun and portable air compressor makes quick work of these duties. When leaving home or the launch, fasten tie-down and winch straps to the boat and inspect them regularly for wear (carry spares too in your kit). Lastly, secure items, such as oars and gas tanks, so they don’t move during travel.

 

Keep a tire pressure gauge in your boat and check your trailer and vehicle tires regularly for proper inflation.

Safety Gear
An important element of boat organization is proper safety equipment placement. A fire extinguisher is useless buried beneath a pile of items; it should always be within reach. It’s the same for PFDs and other safety gear, such as flares, whistles, throw ropes, etc. Also, learn to neatly loop rope to avoid tangles. Always check state safetyand national requirements for mandatory boating accessories based on the size of vessel or water you’re fishing.

Other Essential Supplies
Piggybacking on the above safety items, I also recommend storing the following in your boat: first-aid kit, bug spray, sunscreen, spare sunglasses, various medications (to handle allergies, motion sickness, headaches, etc.), an emergency hook remover kit, a few water bottles and snacks, such as nuts and granola or energy bars. I keep these in various Ziploc-style bags stored within a sealed, plastic tote for extra water protection. Label plastic totes with permanent black marker for quick identification.

 

A Proper Supply Of Boat Tools
Just like safety items, you should also carry a tool kit (screwdriver, ratchet sets, pliers, etc.) for any on-the-water repairs you might need to perform. I carry a spare prop, pins, spark plugs, and oil for my main motor and the first two items in this list for my electric one.

I also have a small plastic tote for miscellaneous items that have served me well over the years. It contains electrical tape, a knife, zip ties, plastic bags, a spare flashlight and batteries, absorbent towel, and plenty of spare fuses. Jumper cables are also good to have in case you need to boost your boat’s cranking battery. In the past two years I’ve seen this happen three times, all in different boats. This happens more than many of us would like to admit, so spend the $20 and keep “jumpers” in your boat.

C-R-toolsHave Release Tools At The Ready

When practicing catch and release, having the proper tools within reach is critical to getting fish back in the water quickly with minimal stress. Plus, the faster you can properly land and release a fish, the sooner you can catch another one! This begins by keeping your net easily accessible. Next, have a designated spot, compartment, or holder for pliers, hemostats, a hook disgorger, jaw spreaders, line cutters, scissors, and scale. Also, keep a golf or utility towel within reach to dry off hands afterwards; this prevents fingers from getting chilled in cold weather. You can buy mounts to hold these items.

Be sure to replenish supplies throughout the season. Carrying the above tools will ensure you’re prepared for a variety of minor and more serious boating situations.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: