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Category Archives: Moose

THE MOOSE – Bold, Majestic & Potentially Dangerous

moose at night If you’ve ever driven any distance through the Canadian bush – especially endless miles of tree-lined, two-lane highways, then you will know about the moose as they often move about our Canadian highways freely.

There are foreboding signs along the way featuring outlines of these hulking creatures nonchalantly strolling across your path. The message is not one of protecting the environment, it is one of avoiding mortal danger and a warning to YOU.

Moose-warning

An uneasy feeling starts to set in right about dusk, when the light of the sky darkens enough to match the light thrown by your high-beams.

If you know about the threat of the moose you will tend to slow down just a little, and your eyes will skirt furtively for motion and shadows along the treeline. Because you do not want to hit a moose. If you do, it will almost certainly be THE event of your day. Although generally timid, the males become very bold during the breeding season, when the female  sutter a loud call, which can be heard from up to 2 miles away, and are often mistaken for lowing cattle; at such times they fight both with their antlers and their hoofs. Fierce clashing of antlers between males is also not uncommon during the rutting season. The female gives birth to one or two young at a time, which are not spotted. The gestation period for a moose is about 216-240 days. After the young are born, they drink the mother’s milk, which is very high in fat and other nutrients. Because of the milk, the calf grows very fast.

moose-down-the-road-from

The cow moose is reported to kill more people in Canada than any other animal (far exceeding the toll of the grizzly bear). These large animals can be extremely protective of their young, and caution should be exercised when approaching a cow moose.

In the spring, moose can often been seen in drainage ditches at the side of roads, taking advantage of road salt which has run off the road. These minerals replace electrolytes missing from their winter diet. However, this is where the most potential danger lies in these locations as the moose will come out to the open for various reasons one especially to get away from the flies. So on your journey up to Wawang Lake be sure to heed the warning signs – keep your eyes peeled and scan the timberline on each side of the road for these majestic animals.

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Posted by on October 16, 2016 in Adventure, Moose, Moose sightings, Wildlife

 

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About Wawang Lake

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No Other Resorts, Homes or Cottages on our lake – just us & YOU!  As a matter of fact our nearest neighbors are 28 miles south of us.  Our post office is further yet at 50 miles south of us.  So if you’re getting the impression we are secluded – you would be right.

Terry came to this magnificent area in 1969 and I soon followed a few years later.  One day he said to me, “We should build a resort’.  What he didn’t know about me and soon would learn is that when I have a goal – I’m relentless and will see it through.  So – Wawang Lake Resort is here today because of our efforts and shear determination –  it couldn’t be any other way..

Now let me tell you a little about our lake and our resort…….

Wawang Lake is a 5,000 acre spring fed lake with  miles of  irregular shoreline,  which offers  the fisherman great fish  habitat to explore, such as sandbars, shoals,  weed beds and  islands and many of these areas are adjacent to deep water making them attractive and popular fishing spots for both walleye and pike & perfect  for exciting  fishing for the fisherman.

Our  lake is  easy to navigate and offers a variety of lake structure that is excellent  for both walleye and northern pike and better yet it’s nearly stress free for mishaps for those that bring their own boats.

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We have seven cabins that have a spectacular view of our magnificent lake.  You  will  be sure  to enjoy the beauty  of our 1,500′ tropical like beach with gradual incline, and, the resort’s shoreline bottom is all sand for an afternoon swim or just relax tanning on the beach.  Our lake also has many other sand beaches that are  perfect for a private swim, or the traditional shore lunch.

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Upon your arrival we offer a detailed map of the lake and will highlight areas showing where the successful fishing has been prior to your arrival.   Our main objective for the angler is to catch fish.  Our main objective for the hunter is to be successful.

New Wawang Lake Map2 (2)
Wawang Lake is well-known for its trophy sized walleye and northern and over the years has brought many great memories of the action and the numbers of these large fish have offered.  For instance, the largest walleye  caught & released was 37”  15 1/2 lb, and, the largest northern also caught & released was 52.5”  38 1/2 lb.  Guests have stated that they have caught and released many trophy fish during their stay in fact our records show that one guest caught over 40 trophy fish in three visits to Wawang Lake.  Nice!

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THE AQUATIC MOOSE

Moose feed on a large variety of foods. They browse on the twigs and leaves of many kinds of plants.. Grasses and marsh plants are also sought.

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Aquatic vegetation growing in lakes and streams is particularly relished in summer. During this season of the year, animals are seen at the edges of water or feeding in it.   Adult moose will stand virtually submerged in deep water, lowering their heads underwater, grazing for long periods of time on underwater growth.   Where a moose cannot reach these succulent plants, it can actually dive in deep water (up to 20 feet), remaining below for up to one minute.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS T
ESTIMONIALS
    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Join 37,962 other followers

 

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THE MOOSE – Bold, Majestic & Potentially Dangerous

moose at night If you’ve ever driven any distance through the Canadian bush – especially endless miles of tree-lined, two-lane highways, then you will know about the moose as they often move about our Canadian highways freely.

There are foreboding signs along the way featuring outlines of these hulking creatures nonchalantly strolling across your path. The message is not one of protecting the environment, it is one of avoiding mortal danger and a warning to YOU.

Moose-warning

An uneasy feeling starts to set in right about dusk, when the light of the sky darkens enough to match the light thrown by your high-beams.

If you know about the threat of the moose you will tend to slow down just a little, and your eyes will skirt furtively for motion and shadows along the treeline. Because you do not want to hit a moose. If you do, it will almost certainly be THE event of your day. Although generally timid, the males become very bold during the breeding season, when the female  sutter a loud call, which can be heard from up to 2 miles away, and are often mistaken for lowing cattle; at such times they fight both with their antlers and their hoofs. Fierce clashing of antlers between males is also not uncommon during the rutting season. The female gives birth to one or two young at a time, which are not spotted. The gestation period for a moose is about 216-240 days. After the young are born, they drink the mother’s milk, which is very high in fat and other nutrients. Because of the milk, the calf grows very fast.

moose-down-the-road-from

The cow moose is reported to kill more people in Canada than any other animal (far exceeding the toll of the grizzly bear). These large animals can be extremely protective of their young, and caution should be exercised when approaching a cow moose.

In the spring, moose can often been seen in drainage ditches at the side of roads, taking advantage of road salt which has run off the road. These minerals replace electrolytes missing from their winter diet. However, this is where the most potential danger lies in these locations as the moose will come out to the open for various reasons one especially to get away from the flies. So on your journey up to Wawang Lake be sure to heed the warning signs – keep your eyes peeled and scan the timberline on each side of the road for these majestic animals.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 37,962 other followers

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 26, 2015 in Adventure, Moose, Moose sightings, Wildlife

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

THE MOOSE – Bold, Majestic & Potentially Dangerous

moose at night If you’ve ever driven any distance through the Canadian bush – especially endless miles of tree-lined, two-lane highways, then you will know about the moose as they often move about our Canadian highways freely.

There are foreboding signs along the way featuring outlines of these hulking creatures nonchalantly strolling across your path. The message is not one of protecting the environment, it is one of avoiding mortal danger and a warning to YOU.

Moose-warning

An uneasy feeling starts to set in right about dusk, when the light of the sky darkens enough to match the light thrown by your high-beams.

If you know about the threat of the moose you will tend to slow down just a little, and your eyes will skirt furtively for motion and shadows along the treeline. Because you do not want to hit a moose. If you do, it will almost certainly be THE event of your day. Although generally timid, the males become very bold during the breeding season, when the female  sutter a loud call, which can be heard from up to 2 miles away, and are often mistaken for lowing cattle; at such times they fight both with their antlers and their hoofs. Fierce clashing of antlers between males is also not uncommon during the rutting season. The female gives birth to one or two young at a time, which are not spotted. The gestation period for a moose is about 216-240 days. After the young are born, they drink the mother’s milk, which is very high in fat and other nutrients. Because of the milk, the calf grows very fast.

moose-down-the-road-from

The cow moose is reported to kill more people in Canada than any other animal (far exceeding the toll of the grizzly bear). These large animals can be extremely protective of their young, and caution should be exercised when approaching a cow moose.

In the spring, moose can often been seen in drainage ditches at the side of roads, taking advantage of road salt which has run off the road. These minerals replace electrolytes missing from their winter diet. However, this is where the most potential danger lies in these locations as the moose will come out to the open for various reasons one especially to get away from the flies. So on your journey up to Wawang Lake be sure to heed the warning signs – keep your eyes peeled and scan the timberline on each side of the road for these majestic animals.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 37,962 other followers

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 21, 2014 in Adventure, Moose, Moose sightings, Wildlife

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

THE MOOSE – Bold, Majestic & Potentially Dangerous

moose at night
If you’ve ever driven any distance through the Canadian bush – especially endless miles of tree-lined, two-lane highways, then you will know about the moose as they often move about our Canadian highways freely.

There are foreboding signs along the way featuring outlines of these hulking creatures nonchalantly strolling across your path. The message is not one of protecting the environment, it is one of avoiding mortal danger and a warning to YOU.

Moose-warning

An uneasy feeling starts to set in right about dusk, when the light of the sky darkens enough to match the light thrown by your high-beams.

If you know about the threat of the moose you will tend to slow down just a little, and your eyes will skirt furtively for motion and shadows along the treeline. Because you do not want to hit a moose. If you do, it will almost certainly be THE event of your day.

Although generally timid, the males become very bold during the breeding season, when the female  sutter a loud call, which can be heard from up to 2 miles away, and are often mistaken for lowing cattle; at such times they fight both with their antlers and their hoofs. Fierce clashing of antlers between males is also not uncommon during the rutting season.

The female gives birth to one or two young at a time, which are not spotted. The gestation period for a moose is about 216-240 days. After the young are born, they drink the mother’s milk, which is very high in fat and other nutrients. Because of the milk, the calf grows very fast.

moose-down-the-road-from

The cow moose is reported to kill more people in Canada than any other animal (far exceeding the toll of the grizzly bear). These large animals can be extremely protective of their young, and caution should be exercised when approaching a cow moose.

In the spring, moose can often been seen in drainage ditches at the side of roads, taking advantage of road salt which has run off the road. These minerals replace electrolytes missing from their winter diet. However, this is where the most potential danger lies in these locations as the moose will imagesCAIAXVDYcome out to the open for various reasons one especially to get away from the flies.

So on your journey up to Wawang Lake be sure to heed the warning signs – keep your eyes peeled and scan the timberline on each side of the road for these majestic animals.

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2013 in Adventure, Moose, Moose sightings, Wildlife

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Video

THE AQUATIC MOOSE

Moose feed on a large variety of foods. They browse on the twigs and leaves of many kinds of plants.. Grasses and marsh plants are also sought.

Aquatic vegetation growing in lakes and streams is particularly relished in summer. During this season of the year, animals are        seen at the edges of water or feeding in it.   Adult moose will stand virtually submerged in deep water, lowering their heads        underwater, grazing for long periods of time on underwater growth.   Where a moose cannot reach these succulent plants, it can actually dive in deep water (up to 20 feet), remaining below for up to  one minute.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
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