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Category Archives: OUTDOOR FUN

Mosquito Repellent Plants

Ageratum
As summer fast approaches, we would like to suggest plants that will repel mosquitoes in your landscape and how to use these plants to enjoy the outdoors during summer. In addition to the plants that repel mosquitoes eco-friendly ways to keep mosquitoes from your outdoor living spaces. The picture above is Ageratum.

075_16Basil
Some areas of the southeast have had drought busting rainstorms and even with the tremendous amounts of rainfall, these areas are still considered to be under drought conditions. With the severe amounts of rainfall that comes into an area, and the warmer temperatures of the season that is a sure sign the pesky mosquito is not far behind. The picture above is Basil.

The plants that we are suggesting will repel mosquitoes from your outdoor living space. There are a few suggestions when planning to use the plants mentioned to enhance the natural repelling abilities:

  • Use the plants in containers around your patio, deck, or outdoor living space such as patio tables and chairs.
  • Use the plants in containers or planted in the ground by your front door and your back door.
  • Lemon Grass is the #1 recommended plant to grow in the landscape and in containers to use around your patio, deck or outdoor living spaces to repel mosquitoes during the summer.
  • Before having outdoor activities brush the Lemon Grass to release more of its fragrance.
  • Lemon Grass can be used in cooking.

Here are a few suggestions recommended to do in addition to using the recommended plants:

  • Fix all outdoor facets that drip.
  • Drain your birdbath twice a week and refill your birdbath.

marigolds
Turn your empty outside pots and containers upside down to prevent the containers from collecting water.

Drain your plant saucers that collect water once a week, mosquitos lay their eggs in stagnant water.

To reduce numerous other flying insects, including mosquitoes, plant marigolds in containers or in the landscape (shown on left).

There are additional benefits to adding mosquito-repelling plants to your landscape. A few of the benefits are that the mixture of plants listed can be used in addition to repelling mosquitoes, but also used as herbs in cooking, the trees listed will attract additional wildlife such as birds to the garden to give natural predators of mosquitoes a safe heaven, the majority of the plants are nectar and larval food plants for butterflies in your area, and the Silver Dollar Tree can be used in your fresh cut flower arrangements as greens. The picture below is Cadaga Tree.
Cadaga%20Tree

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CAMPING IDEAS – Very Useful

Use Tic-Tac boxes to store spices for camping. Brilliant! Takes up less space and no glass to carry.

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POTS & PAN HANGER

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The Swedish Torch – Campfire

This is a great idea for small spaces and uses less wood too!  Ideal for cooking on or simply enjoying the atmosphere.  So on your next trip to the outdoors give this one a try.

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Beautiful Northern Lights

Nothing is more spectacular than the northern lights and these can be viewed as early as late June depending on the season’s climate.  The cooler the better for the ‘lights’ to make their presence known.   Enjoy a campfire, watch the bright, twinkling stars and wait for the northern lights to appear ……beautiful!

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Canadian Marten (sable)

????????????????????????????????????????The Marten is active about 16 hours a day during the spring and summer.

It is an agile climber but takes almost all its prey on the ground.

They exemplify curiosity, ferocity, and lightning-fast reflexes of the weasel family.

The Marten is known for its beautiful coat that is marketed as Canadian or American sable and generally commands a high price

The marten is a common animal at Wawang Lake and its a treat when our guests get an opportunity to see one.  It is a small predator, and a member of the weasel family. It is similar in size to a small cat but has shorter legs, a more slender body, a bushy tail, and a pointed face. The fur varies from pale yellowish buff to dark blackish brown. During winter, the marten has a beautiful dark brown fur coat and a bright orange throat patch. The summer coat is lighter in colour and not nearly as thick.

The Mustelidae family also includes several other more familiar animals such as the ermine, skunk, and mink. It is thought that martens entered North America from Asia about 60 000 years ago. There are several species of martens worldwide and perhaps the most famous is the Russian sable, which is well known for its luxurious fur.

martenSigns and sounds
In winter, the soles of a marten’s feet are covered with fur and the toes are not distinguishable in the tracks. Tracks are about 3.7 cm long and form two ovals that overlap by about one third. This happens because martens travel with a loping sort of gait, and the hind feet land in the tracks left by the front feet. Loping is common among mustelids, and it takes some practice to be able to distinguish the tracks of the various species.

Habitat and Habits
Martens prefer old growth coniferous or mixed woods forest, although they may seek food in some open areas. However, the amount of undisturbed forest is continually diminishing, and new-growth forests do not support as many marten as the original forest did. In northern Ontario, for example, the density of marten in forests logged 10 to 50 years ago is only 10 to 30 percent of the number in uncut areas. Loss of habitat has contributed in a major way to the decline in abundance of this species in North America. There is some indication that martens may tolerate partial logging of their habitat, but this needs more study and a cooperative multiple use management program for forested lands.

imagesCA50BXP6The marten is a solitary animal. Adults will maintain living areas—called home ranges—by keeping out other members of the same sex while tolerating members of the opposite sex. Males and females spend time together only during the mating season. Home ranges vary in size with changes in both the marten population and the abundance of food. When food is abundant a male’s range is about 3.5 km; if food is scarce this size may double. Females require only about half the area needed by males. Home ranges in logged areas are also much larger than those in uncut forest.

Marten hunt at all times of the day in spring and summer and are most active at daybreak and dusk. During these seasons they are active for about 16 hours a day. Females with young in the den are only active during the day for about six to eight hours. As the temperatures drop, marten are increasingly less active at night. During the coldest months they may hunt for only a few hours in the warmest part of the day. If the weather turns stormy and very cold they may even den up for several days.

Unique characteristics
Curious and excitable, martens hunt by investigating underneath downed trees and stumps, inside hollow trees, and in dense clumps of young conifers. In winter, they are known to hunt beneath the snow in tunnels created by red squirrels or under snow-covered logs. Loggers often see them near their camps, and a stolen lunch bag is not unheard of. The marten exemplifies the curiosity, ferocity, and lightning-fast reflexes of the weasel family.  Marten are known not to be fond of water. However, swimming martens have been seen, although they travelled only a short distance.
imagesCAED1191Feeding
The marten is often described as an “arboreal predator,” but this is inaccurate. The misconception probably arose from the fact that martens are seen in trees where they have climbed to escape an intruder. Martens are agile climbers but take almost all their prey on the ground. They have an extremely varied diet and are classed as generalized predators; that is, they will eat whatever they can catch. Mostly they feed on mice, voles, hare, grouse, squirrels, and shrews. They are also known to take birds’ eggs and amphibians and make extensive use of berries, especially raspberries and blueberries.

imagesCAGQS5FWBreeding
Male and female martens spend time together only during the mating season in late July and early August. The female rears the young alone. Litter size is reported to range from two to six but is most often three, and the young are born in March or April, eight or nine months after mating.

This is an abnormally long gestation, or pregnancy, period for a small mammal and results from a phenomenon known as delayed implantation. After mating and fertilization, development of the embryo stops at a very early stage. Implantation into the uterus wall does not take place until February. Delayed implantation occurs in several other members of the Mustelidae family as well.

imagesCA25RVGNThe young are born in a den, usually located inside a hollow tree. At birth, they weigh about 30 g, are blind, and are covered with a very fine fur. The female nurses the young well into the summer, spending little time away from the den until the young leave with her in June or July. Raising the young is an extremely energy-demanding task, and the female may lose considerable weight during this period. The kits apparently stay with their mother until late August or September, when they disperse. Females may breed in their first year, but most do not breed until they are two years old.  Males are probably not capable of breeding until their second year either.

 

 

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Turn Soda Cans Into a Portable Camp Stove

When you’re camping, there’s nothing quite like cooking your own meals under the stars. For a handy camping stove that’s lightweight, portable and easy to make, try a beverage can stove. Made of two aluminum soda cans, they weigh almost nothing, yet can generate enough heat to boil water. These stoves are also great to have around for emergencies.

Things You’ll Need

  • Two aluminum soda cans
  • Hobby knife
  • Scissors
  • Black marker
  • Hardcover book that is about one inch thick
  • Stapler

Step 1:The stove has three components: the top section, the bottom section, and an inner wall. Find a hardcover book that is about 1” thick. Place a black marker on the book with the tip touching the side of a soda can, and spin the soda can to create a level mark around the can. This can will be for the bottom section.

Mark the first can

Step 2:Fold back the front and back cover of the book, and place the black marker on the stack of inner pages. With the marker tip touching the side of the second soda can, spin the can to create a level mark around the can, resulting in a line that is about a quarter inch lower than the line on the first can. This can will be for the top section.

Mark the second can

Mark the second can

Step 3:Lay the can for the top section on its side. Using a sharp hobby knife, cut the bottom of the can, just inside the outer rim. For safety, it is best to be patient with this step. Keep running the blade in a circle until the metal weakens and the circle pops out.

Cut out the bottom of the can

Step 4:Turn the can upside down with the hole you just cut at the top. Cover the rim with masking tape and mark 16 equidistant points. Using a push pin and hammer, punch a hole at each of these marks, and then remove the tape. The tape helps to keep the push pin from slipping as you hammer it into the can. You now have your top section completed.

Punch holes on the rim

Punch holes on the rim

Step 5:Now that the top section can is prepared, cut off the rest of the can, using the black line drawn on the can as a guide. It is easier to puncture the can with a hobby knife and then cut along the line with scissors. Repeat this step with the second can — the one that will be used as the bottom section of the stove.

Cut out the bottom of the can

Cut out the bottom of the can

Step 6:Measure the height of the bottom section. From some of the excess aluminum, cut a strip of metal that is about ¼” higher than the height of the bottom section. This will become the inner wall of the stove.

Cut a strip for the inner wall

Cut a strip for the inner wall

Step 7:Roll the metal strip so it fits snugly in the bottom groove of the bottom section. Staple the ends of the strip where they overlap to keep this inner piece at this size. You now have your inner wall.

Size the inner wall

Size the inner wall

Step 8:Cut three squares on the bottom of the inner wall to allow fuel to travel from the center cavity to the outer rim.

Cut three slots in the inner wall

Cut three slots in the inner wall

Step 9:Cut eight vertical slits in the top section up to the line where the printing on the can starts. When it’s time to connect all the pieces, these slits will help you slide the top section into the bottom section.

Cut slits on the top section

Cut slits on the top section

Step 10:Place the inner wall piece within the bottom can, making sure that the openings you cut are at the bottom. The inner wall should fit snugly in the grooves in both the top and bottom sections. Slide the top section between the inner wall and bottom section.

Assemble the stove

Assemble the stove

Step 11:Fill the inner cavity of the stove about half way with denatured alcohol. You can find denatured alcohol at hardware stores in the paint aisle. Place the stove between two bricks that are slightly taller than the stove. Your pot will sit on the bricks and be elevated above the stove.

Place stove between two bricks

Place stove between two bricks

Light the stove

Step 12:When it is time for cooking, ignite the fuel in the stove with a match or lighter. As the fuel heats, flames will come out of the holes on the rim of the soda can.

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Mosquito Repellent Plants

Ageratum
As summer fast approaches, we would like to suggest plants that will repel mosquitoes in your landscape and how to use these plants to enjoy the outdoors during summer. In addition to the plants that repel mosquitoes eco-friendly ways to keep mosquitoes from your outdoor living spaces. The picture above is Ageratum.

075_16Basil
Some areas of the southeast have had drought busting rainstorms and even with the tremendous amounts of rainfall, these areas are still considered to be under drought conditions. With the severe amounts of rainfall that comes into an area, and the warmer temperatures of the season that is a sure sign the pesky mosquito is not far behind. The picture above is Basil.

The plants that we are suggesting will repel mosquitoes from your outdoor living space. There are a few suggestions when planning to use the plants mentioned to enhance the natural repelling abilities:

  • Use the plants in containers around your patio, deck, or outdoor living space such as patio tables and chairs.
  • Use the plants in containers or planted in the ground by your front door and your back door.
  • Lemon Grass is the #1 recommended plant to grow in the landscape and in containers to use around your patio, deck or outdoor living spaces to repel mosquitoes during the summer.
  • Before having outdoor activities brush the Lemon Grass to release more of its fragrance.
  • Lemon Grass can be used in cooking.

Here are a few suggestions recommended to do in addition to using the recommended plants:

  • Fix all outdoor facets that drip.
  • Drain your birdbath twice a week and refill your birdbath.

marigolds
Turn your empty outside pots and containers upside down to prevent the containers from collecting water.

Drain your plant saucers that collect water once a week, mosquitos lay their eggs in stagnant water.

To reduce numerous other flying insects, including mosquitoes, plant marigolds in containers or in the landscape (shown on left).

There are additional benefits to adding mosquito-repelling plants to your landscape. A few of the benefits are that the mixture of plants listed can be used in addition to repelling mosquitoes, but also used as herbs in cooking, the trees listed will attract additional wildlife such as birds to the garden to give natural predators of mosquitoes a safe heaven, the majority of the plants are nectar and larval food plants for butterflies in your area, and the Silver Dollar Tree can be used in your fresh cut flower arrangements as greens. The picture below is Cadaga Tree.
Cadaga%20Tree

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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