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Category Archives: Safety kits

BEST Mosquito Bite Remedy EVER!!

mosquito-bite-remedy

When mosquitos look at kids, they see little targets everywhere.  One evening outside means days of itchy welts.  Big golf ball kinds of welts!  You can go through a lot of Benadryl every summer because it’s been the only thing that gives them any relief, but there is a better, safer, cheaper way to get rid of that itch.  Soap!  Just rub a bar of dry soap over a mosquito bite and feel better instantly.  Seriously!

COMMENT:  Claudia’s poor little legs were covered with mosquito bites that were even keeping her awake at night.  The anti-itch creams weren’t working for long, and giving her Benadryl during the school day just wasn’t practical, so I turned to my old friend Google.  A quick search led me to TipNut, where I found the perfect remedy to make my sweet girl feel better.  A plain old bar of soap!  And it works!

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The Sudden Storm

 A true story…….

survival4
On July 4, Doug Fehler, 56, was fishing with his wife and grandkids when a huge thunderstorm swamped his boat. As told to Kristyn Brady.

The boys, Carter, 9, and Charlie, who’s just 5, were casting for perch, while Kristye and I put out jug lines for catfish on Oklahoma’s Broken Bow Lake. We had made the trip up from Texas for a Fourth of July getaway. We’d been fishing for maybe 30 minutes when the sky rumbled. I looked around and saw a huge thunderhead, followed by a lightning flash. It had been a scorcher of an afternoon with a few scattered clouds, and the marina parking lot was packed less than an hour earlier when we launched my 15-foot bass boat, a restored 1980 Caddo, toward a series of small islands. But with the lightning, I thought it best to get off the water.

As we motored toward the edge of the cove, the storm cloud had grown and the sky darkened. The wind picked up, but we’d had more shelter than I realized before our boat cleared the last island, where we were spit out into some of the roughest open water I’ve ever seen. The wind howled and waves slammed into the side of the boat, spilling inside. Without notice, a 7-foot swell crashed over our heads. I struggled to turn us into the oncoming wind and waves, soaked but holding on. Fortunately, we were already wearing our life vests.

Wave after wave crashed over the bow, but I didn’t even notice the water rushing past my feet because I was so focused on keeping the boat straight and running. I heard Kristye yell from the rear, where she was sitting with Charlie. I looked back to see him sitting on the floor with water up to his armpits. He didn’t seem to understand the danger, and just looked back at me expectantly. I could tell Carter was scared, but he was quiet and clung to the rail next to me.

I started to panic. It had been less than 10 minutes, but it felt like we’d been battling the waves much longer. The gas tanks were floating. The cooler had escaped over the side. The battery was under-water. That’s when the engine died.

Without the engine, we were being pushed toward a rocky bluff. If the boat had turned broadside to the waves, the next one would have capsized us. I was just about to jump in to try and pull us to shore when I heard a ski boat speeding toward us. They were able to drag our craft—the transom end completely underwater—and beach it nearby. I stayed with my boat, bailing out, while the driver of the ski boat took Kristye and the boys to the marina. As they left, Charlie was crying in Kristye’s arms, and I couldn’t help but worry that splitting up was the wrong decision. They got some bumps and bruises on the rough ride back, but we were reunited an hour later on the dock, where we all shed a few tears.

My boat’s tri-hull design was not built for those conditions, but I knew that. I would never purposely steer into waves that size. We were blindsided. Carter still doesn’t like to talk about that afternoon, and he hasn’t been on a boat since. I’m hoping that will pass. The whole thing has kept me awake a few nights. I go over the experience in my head, thinking what was at stake. It still gives me chill-bumps.

Survival Analysis

survival5

Because one cannot fault Fehler’s actions once his boat was caught in heavy water—he made sure everyone was wearing a PFD, kept the bow pointed into the waves, and navigated toward safe harbor—the only question of right and wrong here concerns the decision to cross open water. The family probably could have weathered the storm in relative safety among the islands, and Fehler’s decision to leave is one I am sure he would like to have back.

This situation reminds me of an antelope hunting trip I made with my brother on Montana’s Fort Peck Reservoir, where we found ourselves separated from the dock by a mile-wide channel. Like Fehler, we didn’t have a boat seaworthy enough to meet the conditions once the storm broke. Unlike him, we were able to see how far conditions had deteriorated, so the decision to shelter on a spit of land was a no-brainer. We ended up being trapped by weather there for three days.

The survival lesson here is not so much to be prepared to brave the devil water, but to be prepared to stay, which makes a safe decision much easier. Always check the weather forecast ahead of time, and carry a radio, cellphone, distress flags, and signal flares, as well as a survival bag. Do not forget extra dry clothing, and make sure the book in your dry bag is a long one.

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Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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The Sudden Storm

survival4
On July 4, Doug Fehler, 56, was fishing with his wife and grandkids when a huge thunderstorm swamped his boat. As told to Kristyn Brady.

The boys, Carter, 9, and Charlie, who’s just 5, were casting for perch, while Kristye and I put out jug lines for catfish on Oklahoma’s Broken Bow Lake. We had made the trip up from Texas for a Fourth of July getaway. We’d been fishing for maybe 30 minutes when the sky rumbled. I looked around and saw a huge thunderhead, followed by a lightning flash. It had been a scorcher of an afternoon with a few scattered clouds, and the marina parking lot was packed less than an hour earlier when we launched my 15-foot bass boat, a restored 1980 Caddo, toward a series of small islands. But with the lightning, I thought it best to get off the water.

As we motored toward the edge of the cove, the storm cloud had grown and the sky darkened. The wind picked up, but we’d had more shelter than I realized before our boat cleared the last island, where we were spit out into some of the roughest open water I’ve ever seen. The wind howled and waves slammed into the side of the boat, spilling inside. Without notice, a 7-foot swell crashed over our heads. I struggled to turn us into the oncoming wind and waves, soaked but holding on. Fortunately, we were already wearing our life vests.

Wave after wave crashed over the bow, but I didn’t even notice the water rushing past my feet because I was so focused on keeping the boat straight and running. I heard Kristye yell from the rear, where she was sitting with Charlie. I looked back to see him sitting on the floor with water up to his armpits. He didn’t seem to understand the danger, and just looked back at me expectantly. I could tell Carter was scared, but he was quiet and clung to the rail next to me.

I started to panic. It had been less than 10 minutes, but it felt like we’d been battling the waves much longer. The gas tanks were floating. The cooler had escaped over the side. The battery was under-water. That’s when the engine died.

Without the engine, we were being pushed toward a rocky bluff. If the boat had turned broadside to the waves, the next one would have capsized us. I was just about to jump in to try and pull us to shore when I heard a ski boat speeding toward us. They were able to drag our craft—the transom end completely underwater—and beach it nearby. I stayed with my boat, bailing out, while the driver of the ski boat took Kristye and the boys to the marina. As they left, Charlie was crying in Kristye’s arms, and I couldn’t help but worry that splitting up was the wrong decision. They got some bumps and bruises on the rough ride back, but we were reunited an hour later on the dock, where we all shed a few tears.

My boat’s tri-hull design was not built for those conditions, but I knew that. I would never purposely steer into waves that size. We were blindsided. Carter still doesn’t like to talk about that afternoon, and he hasn’t been on a boat since. I’m hoping that will pass. The whole thing has kept me awake a few nights. I go over the experience in my head, thinking what was at stake. It still gives me chill-bumps.

Survival Analysis

survival5

Because one cannot fault Fehler’s actions once his boat was caught in heavy water—he made sure everyone was wearing a PFD, kept the bow pointed into the waves, and navigated toward safe harbor—the only question of right and wrong here concerns the decision to cross open water. The family probably could have weathered the storm in relative safety among the islands, and Fehler’s decision to leave is one I am sure he would like to have back.

This situation reminds me of an antelope hunting trip I made with my brother on Montana’s Fort Peck Reservoir, where we found ourselves separated from the dock by a mile-wide channel. Like Fehler, we didn’t have a boat seaworthy enough to meet the conditions once the storm broke. Unlike him, we were able to see how far conditions had deteriorated, so the decision to shelter on a spit of land was a no-brainer. We ended up being trapped by weather there for three days.

The survival lesson here is not so much to be prepared to brave the devil water, but to be prepared to stay, which makes a safe decision much easier. Always check the weather forecast ahead of time, and carry a radio, cellphone, distress flags, and signal flares, as well as a survival bag. Do not forget extra dry clothing, and make sure the book in your dry bag is a long one.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,124 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

BEST Mosquito Bite Remedy EVER!!

mosquito-bite-remedy

When mosquitos look at kids, they see little targets everywhere.  One evening outside means days of itchy welts.  Big golf ball kinds of welts!  You can go through a lot of Benadryl every summer because it’s been the only thing that gives them any relief, but there is a better, safer, cheaper way to get rid of that itch.  Soap!  Just rub a bar of dry soap over a mosquito bite and feel better instantly.  Seriously!

COMMENT:  Claudia’s poor little legs were covered with mosquito bites that were even keeping her awake at night.  The anti-itch creams weren’t working for long, and giving her Benadryl during the school day just wasn’t practical, so I turned to my old friend Google.  A quick search led me to TipNut, where I found the perfect remedy to make my sweet girl feel better.  A plain old bar of soap!  And it works!

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,124 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Being prepared will make all the difference in your next upcoming fishing trip.  Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure to Wawang Lake Resort.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,124 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fishing Gear Checklist

Here’s a checklist of things you’ll want to bring on your next fishing adventure.

Tackle And Gear

fishing

__ Rods: spinning, casting, trolling

__ Reels: Spooled with line

__ Extra line: fluorocarbon leader, monofilament, or superbraid

__ Tackle bag or tackle box

__ Hardbaits: crankbaits and minnowbaits

__ Spinnerbaits and inline spinners

__ Soft-plastics: grubs, tubes, jerkbaits, worms, lizards

__ Topwaters: poppers, walk-the-dogs, plastic frogs, buzzbaits

__ Bass hooks: offset shank for Texas-rigging, wide gap for wacky rigging

__ Bass flipping jigs

__ Walleye hooks for livebait: octopus

__ Circle hooks for catfish and pike

__ Bait hooks of various sizes

__ Various sized spoons

__ Sinkers: split shots, walking, egg

__ Leaders, snaps and swivels

__ Jig heads: ball, darter, tube

__ Bucktail or feather jigs

__ Worm harnesses and livebait rigs

__ Fish scent

__ Bobbers: slip, fixed, and illuminated for night fishing and bobber stops

__ Planner boards

__ Fishing net

__ Live bait: worms, minnows, leeches, and carrying containers (e.g., minnow bucket)

__ Valid fishing license and state regulations

__ Scale/ruler

__ Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs

Clothing

Waders_Boots_1

__ Rain gear: jacket, pants and hat

__ Neoprene gloves or waterproof mittens

__ Waterproof footwear: hiking boots or rubber boots

__ Running shoes or sandals

__ Hats: ball cap, wide-brim, or wool

Clothing: Tops And Bottoms

frabill-lead

__ Moisture-wicking thermal underwear (if fishing in cold weather)

__ Sports bras

__ Moisture-wicking socks

__ Fleece mid-layer shirt and pants

__ Hooded sweater

__ Fleece vest

__ Pile or wool pants

__ Convertible zip-off pants

__ Lightweight shorts

__ Quick-drying swimsuit and towel

__ Moisture-wicking T-shirt and long-sleeve shirt

__ Gear bag to carry extra clothing

General Boating Gear

imagesSU39Q4UW

__ Rod holders

__ Pliers: needle-nose, split ring

__ Fish hook remover/extractor

__ Boat tools: spark plug wrench, pliers, standard wrench

__ Spare tire and jack

__ Life jackets

__ Paddle

__ Bailer or manual bilge

__ Flashlight with fresh batteries

__ Signaling device: horn, whistle, flares

__ Throw rope

__ Bowline

__ Boat fenders

__ Boat trailer tie-downs

__ Fire extinguisher

__ Spare oil

__ Spare spark plugs and fuses

__ Full tank of gas

__ Fish finder

__ GPS Unit

__ Weather radio

__ Hydrographic navigation maps and road maps

__ Map marking pen

__ All-weather pen and notebook

__ Trolling motor and charged battery

__ Duct and electrical tape

Other Items

safety-equipment-263x300

__ Sunscreen

__ Lip balm

__ Sunglasses

__ Bug repellant

__ First Aid/Medical Kit

__ Matches in a waterproof container

__ Biodegradable soap

__ Personal Medicine: eyewash, aspirin, lotion, etc.

__ Other personal toiletry items

__ Water

__ Tape measure

__ Camera

__ Cooler for lunch and drinks with ice packs

__ Thermos for coffee

__ Fillet knife and zippered plastic bags

__ Binoculars

__ Waterproof wrist watch

__ Emergency contact phone numbers

__ Cash, credit card, and phone calling card

__ Driver’s license and vehicle and boat insurance

__ Health insurance information or card

__ Travel alarm clock

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,124 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
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