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Category Archives: Safety

Items You’ll Need in Your Tackle Box

You can never have enough lures. But that’s not all you’ll need on the water. Pack these eight items to make your trip more productive.

anatomyx-tackle2

1. Flashlight: It’s handy whenever you’re out after dark, essential if you’re stranded and have to signal for help.

2. Adjustable Wrench: This has a wide variety of uses, from opening reel covers to tightening trolling-motor bolts.

3. Split-Ring Pliers: They open split rings and allow you to replace hooks quickly and easily.

4. Lure Dye: With Spike-It lure dye, you can change a lure’s hue in seconds

5. First-Aid Supplies: Don’t let a minor injury ruin your day. If you bury a hook in your hand, for example, some simple supplies will let you take care of the problem on the water—and keep fishing.

6. Spare Treble Hooks: Hooks often become dull or damaged when worked over rocks and gravel.

7. Spare Rod Tips: If you’ve never snapped off a rod tip, you will.

8. Glue Stick and Lighter: Use these to affix a new rod tip. Heat the glue stick with the lighter, apply the glue, then slide on the new tip.

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The Sudden Storm

 A true story…….

survival4
On July 4, Doug Fehler, 56, was fishing with his wife and grandkids when a huge thunderstorm swamped his boat. As told to Kristyn Brady.

The boys, Carter, 9, and Charlie, who’s just 5, were casting for perch, while Kristye and I put out jug lines for catfish on Oklahoma’s Broken Bow Lake. We had made the trip up from Texas for a Fourth of July getaway. We’d been fishing for maybe 30 minutes when the sky rumbled. I looked around and saw a huge thunderhead, followed by a lightning flash. It had been a scorcher of an afternoon with a few scattered clouds, and the marina parking lot was packed less than an hour earlier when we launched my 15-foot bass boat, a restored 1980 Caddo, toward a series of small islands. But with the lightning, I thought it best to get off the water.

As we motored toward the edge of the cove, the storm cloud had grown and the sky darkened. The wind picked up, but we’d had more shelter than I realized before our boat cleared the last island, where we were spit out into some of the roughest open water I’ve ever seen. The wind howled and waves slammed into the side of the boat, spilling inside. Without notice, a 7-foot swell crashed over our heads. I struggled to turn us into the oncoming wind and waves, soaked but holding on. Fortunately, we were already wearing our life vests.

Wave after wave crashed over the bow, but I didn’t even notice the water rushing past my feet because I was so focused on keeping the boat straight and running. I heard Kristye yell from the rear, where she was sitting with Charlie. I looked back to see him sitting on the floor with water up to his armpits. He didn’t seem to understand the danger, and just looked back at me expectantly. I could tell Carter was scared, but he was quiet and clung to the rail next to me.

I started to panic. It had been less than 10 minutes, but it felt like we’d been battling the waves much longer. The gas tanks were floating. The cooler had escaped over the side. The battery was under-water. That’s when the engine died.

Without the engine, we were being pushed toward a rocky bluff. If the boat had turned broadside to the waves, the next one would have capsized us. I was just about to jump in to try and pull us to shore when I heard a ski boat speeding toward us. They were able to drag our craft—the transom end completely underwater—and beach it nearby. I stayed with my boat, bailing out, while the driver of the ski boat took Kristye and the boys to the marina. As they left, Charlie was crying in Kristye’s arms, and I couldn’t help but worry that splitting up was the wrong decision. They got some bumps and bruises on the rough ride back, but we were reunited an hour later on the dock, where we all shed a few tears.

My boat’s tri-hull design was not built for those conditions, but I knew that. I would never purposely steer into waves that size. We were blindsided. Carter still doesn’t like to talk about that afternoon, and he hasn’t been on a boat since. I’m hoping that will pass. The whole thing has kept me awake a few nights. I go over the experience in my head, thinking what was at stake. It still gives me chill-bumps.

Survival Analysis

survival5

Because one cannot fault Fehler’s actions once his boat was caught in heavy water—he made sure everyone was wearing a PFD, kept the bow pointed into the waves, and navigated toward safe harbor—the only question of right and wrong here concerns the decision to cross open water. The family probably could have weathered the storm in relative safety among the islands, and Fehler’s decision to leave is one I am sure he would like to have back.

This situation reminds me of an antelope hunting trip I made with my brother on Montana’s Fort Peck Reservoir, where we found ourselves separated from the dock by a mile-wide channel. Like Fehler, we didn’t have a boat seaworthy enough to meet the conditions once the storm broke. Unlike him, we were able to see how far conditions had deteriorated, so the decision to shelter on a spit of land was a no-brainer. We ended up being trapped by weather there for three days.

The survival lesson here is not so much to be prepared to brave the devil water, but to be prepared to stay, which makes a safe decision much easier. Always check the weather forecast ahead of time, and carry a radio, cellphone, distress flags, and signal flares, as well as a survival bag. Do not forget extra dry clothing, and make sure the book in your dry bag is a long one.

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Items You’ll Need in Your Tackle Box

You can never have enough lures. But that’s not all you’ll need on the water. Pack these eight items to make your trip more productive.

anatomyx-tackle2

1. Flashlight: It’s handy whenever you’re out after dark, essential if you’re stranded and have to signal for help.

2. Adjustable Wrench: This has a wide variety of uses, from opening reel covers to tightening trolling-motor bolts.

3. Split-Ring Pliers: They open split rings and allow you to replace hooks quickly and easily.

4. Lure Dye: With Spike-It lure dye, you can change a lure’s hue in seconds

5. First-Aid Supplies: Don’t let a minor injury ruin your day. If you bury a hook in your hand, for example, some simple supplies will let you take care of the problem on the water—and keep fishing.

6. Spare Treble Hooks: Hooks often become dull or damaged when worked over rocks and gravel.

7. Spare Rod Tips: If you’ve never snapped off a rod tip, you will.

8. Glue Stick and Lighter: Use these to affix a new rod tip. Heat the glue stick with the lighter, apply the glue, then slide on the new tip.

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Stay Safe on the Ice!

In general, the rules for ice thickness measurements are:

  • 3″ (7 cm) (new ice) – KEEP OFF
  • 4″ (10 cm) – suitable for ice fishing, cross-country skiing and walking (approx. 200 pounds)
  • 5″ (12 cm) – suitable for a single snowmobile or ATV (approx. 800 pounds)
  • 8″ – 12″ (20 – 30 cm) – suitable for one car, group of people (approx. 1500 – 2000 pounds)
  • 12″ – 15″ (30 – 38 cm) – suitable for a light pickup truck or a van

    These are commonly cited measurements.

    71a2f685754d399b9c39c53124e90f85

    Understand that ice strength is not the same everywhere, not even on the same body of water. The strength of ice is also affected by factors other than color and thickness. Also take into account:Location of the ice: is it on a pond, a lake, a stream or is there evident flowing water underneath it? Is there a flow into or out of the water body? This will give cause for concern.

    Constitution of the water: is it fresh water or saltwater? Sea ice tends to be weaker and needs greater thickness to support the same weight as fresh water.

    External temperature and season: temperature changes constantly. Beware microclimates in the local area. Mid-winter ice is bound to be a lot stronger than spring ice which is subject to rapid thawing and warming bouts of sunshine.

    Size and depth of the water body: larger bodies of water take longer to freeze than smaller ones.

    Presence of snow on the ice: snow can warm up the ice because it acts as an insulator; ice under snow is generally thinner and weaker than ice without snow.

    Weight on ice: what are you putting on the ice? Just you or you and a vehicle? There is a big difference in the weight distribution between a body and a snowmobile with said body on top.

 Stay Safe on the Ice 

iceFor safety, every ice fisherman should keep a life preserver, a length of rope, and a pair of screwdrivers within reach. Aside from the obvious safety factor, the life preserver provides a comfortable cushion for kneeling. The rope gives rescuers a means of pulling you out from a safe distance, should you fall through. You can use the screwdrivers as ice-grippers to help pull yourself out.

Stay Safe While Ice Fishing This Winter!

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The Sudden Storm

survival4
On July 4, Doug Fehler, 56, was fishing with his wife and grandkids when a huge thunderstorm swamped his boat. As told to Kristyn Brady.

The boys, Carter, 9, and Charlie, who’s just 5, were casting for perch, while Kristye and I put out jug lines for catfish on Oklahoma’s Broken Bow Lake. We had made the trip up from Texas for a Fourth of July getaway. We’d been fishing for maybe 30 minutes when the sky rumbled. I looked around and saw a huge thunderhead, followed by a lightning flash. It had been a scorcher of an afternoon with a few scattered clouds, and the marina parking lot was packed less than an hour earlier when we launched my 15-foot bass boat, a restored 1980 Caddo, toward a series of small islands. But with the lightning, I thought it best to get off the water.

As we motored toward the edge of the cove, the storm cloud had grown and the sky darkened. The wind picked up, but we’d had more shelter than I realized before our boat cleared the last island, where we were spit out into some of the roughest open water I’ve ever seen. The wind howled and waves slammed into the side of the boat, spilling inside. Without notice, a 7-foot swell crashed over our heads. I struggled to turn us into the oncoming wind and waves, soaked but holding on. Fortunately, we were already wearing our life vests.

Wave after wave crashed over the bow, but I didn’t even notice the water rushing past my feet because I was so focused on keeping the boat straight and running. I heard Kristye yell from the rear, where she was sitting with Charlie. I looked back to see him sitting on the floor with water up to his armpits. He didn’t seem to understand the danger, and just looked back at me expectantly. I could tell Carter was scared, but he was quiet and clung to the rail next to me.

I started to panic. It had been less than 10 minutes, but it felt like we’d been battling the waves much longer. The gas tanks were floating. The cooler had escaped over the side. The battery was under-water. That’s when the engine died.

Without the engine, we were being pushed toward a rocky bluff. If the boat had turned broadside to the waves, the next one would have capsized us. I was just about to jump in to try and pull us to shore when I heard a ski boat speeding toward us. They were able to drag our craft—the transom end completely underwater—and beach it nearby. I stayed with my boat, bailing out, while the driver of the ski boat took Kristye and the boys to the marina. As they left, Charlie was crying in Kristye’s arms, and I couldn’t help but worry that splitting up was the wrong decision. They got some bumps and bruises on the rough ride back, but we were reunited an hour later on the dock, where we all shed a few tears.

My boat’s tri-hull design was not built for those conditions, but I knew that. I would never purposely steer into waves that size. We were blindsided. Carter still doesn’t like to talk about that afternoon, and he hasn’t been on a boat since. I’m hoping that will pass. The whole thing has kept me awake a few nights. I go over the experience in my head, thinking what was at stake. It still gives me chill-bumps.

Survival Analysis

survival5

Because one cannot fault Fehler’s actions once his boat was caught in heavy water—he made sure everyone was wearing a PFD, kept the bow pointed into the waves, and navigated toward safe harbor—the only question of right and wrong here concerns the decision to cross open water. The family probably could have weathered the storm in relative safety among the islands, and Fehler’s decision to leave is one I am sure he would like to have back.

This situation reminds me of an antelope hunting trip I made with my brother on Montana’s Fort Peck Reservoir, where we found ourselves separated from the dock by a mile-wide channel. Like Fehler, we didn’t have a boat seaworthy enough to meet the conditions once the storm broke. Unlike him, we were able to see how far conditions had deteriorated, so the decision to shelter on a spit of land was a no-brainer. We ended up being trapped by weather there for three days.

The survival lesson here is not so much to be prepared to brave the devil water, but to be prepared to stay, which makes a safe decision much easier. Always check the weather forecast ahead of time, and carry a radio, cellphone, distress flags, and signal flares, as well as a survival bag. Do not forget extra dry clothing, and make sure the book in your dry bag is a long one.

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Ward Off Problems with 10 Garlic Uses

garlicGarlic isn’t just for keeping away Dracula. In fact, the notion that garlic warded off vampires is centuries old and is connected to the fact that garlic is a natural remedy for cuts, mosquito bites, and coughs. Garlic can also be used for making glue, fishing, fighting infections and treating cuts and more.

So, while garlic might come in handy on Halloween for fighting the undead, it’s also important to know what you can use the plant for during the rest of the year. Here are a few little known facts of what you can do with garlic:

Mosquito repellent
If you want to ward off all those blood-sucking vampires from knocking on your door this Halloween, garlic is the way to go! In fact, the notion that garlic wards off vampires might have come from the fact that garlic is a natural mosquito repellent.

It’s not clear exactly why mosquitoes don’t like garlic but it probably has something to do with the plant’s compounds being harmful. You can repel mosquitoes by either hanging garlic cloves around your deck or campsite or by applying garlic extract to your skin.

Garden pesticide
A lot of commercial pesticides can be harmful to the environment and dangerous to keep around your family. Garlic is a natural pesticide and is just as effective as many commercial options. Mince three garlic cloves and add them to a tablespoon of mineral oil and let them sit for 24 hours. Strain out the garlic and add the oil – along with a teaspoon of dish soap – to a pint of water and apply through a spray bottle to your plants.

Fish bait
If your town is running through a worm shortage, don’t fear! Just place a bunch of small marshmallows in a bowl of garlic powder or crushed garlic. Cover the bowl and allow to sit. When you go fishing, just apply the marshmallows to your hook and toss them in the water. The garlic will attract bass, trout and other kinds of fish.

Glue
Garlic can even be used as an adhesive. Crush garlic cloves. Apply the garlic juices to paper and hairline cracks in glass and it will act as an adhesive. Apply the sticky crushed garlic and it’s juices to the cracks and paper and wipe away the excess. Chinese people have been using this method for centuries.

Cough syrup
Garlic is so potent that it can help you suppress that cough and get rid of your sore throat. Boil a quarter pound of garlic cloves in a cup of water. Add honey and sugar for taste. You can also create a garlic tea by soaking a clove of garlic in a cup of water.

Did you know?
An item that wards off the living dead is called an Apotropaic. Garlic is a common example of an apotropaic for vampires.
garlic-uses

Vampire folklore has been connected to rabies. Centuries ago, people would be bitten (sometimes by bats) and start to exhibit symptoms such as hypersensitivity to light and garlic. This would cause them to become nocturnal and eventually to have bloody froth at the mouth and at times, bite others. Little understanding of the disease began the folktales of vampires.

De-icer
In 2008, Ankeny, Iowa, must have smelled pretty potent when they used garlic salt to remove ice off the roads. The garlic salt, which was unfit for human consumption, was donated by a local spice producer.

Athlete’s foot
Garlic is also a natural antifungal! You can use it to combat athlete’s foot infections and cut back on the itching. Add a few cloves of garlic to a warm foot bath and soak your feet for 30 minutes.

Cuts and abrasions
You can use garlic to help treat cuts or abrasions. Gently wash the area of the wound with soapy, warm water and pat it dry with a clean cloth. Peel a garlic clove and bruise one side of it by slamming it on the table or an edge. Then gently apply the bruised area against your cut or abrasion for 5-10 minutes. Garlic contains allicin, which inhibits the growth of several kinds of bacteria and protects against infection. If the garlic stings, remove the garlic instantly.

Ear infections
For centuries, people have used garlic’s anti-bacterial qualities to fight infections – including ear infections. Now, don’t chop up a bunch of garlic cloves and jam them down your ear. Instead, crush garlic cloves with a press and place it in a teaspoon of hot olive oil for five minutes. Strain the garlic and allow the oil to cool. Carefully place a few drops of the remedy at a time down your ear canal. You can also purchase garlic oil made for this purpose.

Splinter removal
Splinters are painful to remove and many times you need a quick, easy solution to get the splinter out. Instead of waiting for the piece to remove itself, place a thin slice of garlic over the splinter and hold it in place with a bandage. The garlic will help the skin work the splinter out within a few hours.

How are you using garlic?
What do you use garlic for? Have a great recipe or use for garlic? Comment below and let everyone know!

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Ward Off Problems with 10 Garlic Uses

garlicGarlic isn’t just for keeping away Dracula. In fact, the notion that garlic warded off vampires is centuries old and is connected to the fact that garlic is a natural remedy for cuts, mosquito bites, and coughs. Garlic can also be used for making glue, fishing, fighting infections and treating cuts and more.

So, while garlic might come in handy on Halloween for fighting the undead, it’s also important to know what you can use the plant for during the rest of the year. Here are a few little known facts of what you can do with garlic:

Mosquito repellent
If you want to ward off all those blood-sucking vampires from knocking on your door this Halloween, garlic is the way to go! In fact, the notion that garlic wards off vampires might have come from the fact that garlic is a natural mosquito repellent.

It’s not clear exactly why mosquitoes don’t like garlic but it probably has something to do with the plant’s compounds being harmful. You can repel mosquitoes by either hanging garlic cloves around your deck or campsite or by applying garlic extract to your skin.

Garden pesticide
A lot of commercial pesticides can be harmful to the environment and dangerous to keep around your family. Garlic is a natural pesticide and is just as effective as many commercial options. Mince three garlic cloves and add them to a tablespoon of mineral oil and let them sit for 24 hours. Strain out the garlic and add the oil – along with a teaspoon of dish soap – to a pint of water and apply through a spray bottle to your plants.

Fish bait
If your town is running through a worm shortage, don’t fear! Just place a bunch of small marshmallows in a bowl of garlic powder or crushed garlic. Cover the bowl and allow to sit. When you go fishing, just apply the marshmallows to your hook and toss them in the water. The garlic will attract bass, trout and other kinds of fish.

Glue
Garlic can even be used as an adhesive. Crush garlic cloves. Apply the garlic juices to paper and hairline cracks in glass and it will act as an adhesive. Apply the sticky crushed garlic and it’s juices to the cracks and paper and wipe away the excess. Chinese people have been using this method for centuries.

Cough syrup
Garlic is so potent that it can help you suppress that cough and get rid of your sore throat. Boil a quarter pound of garlic cloves in a cup of water. Add honey and sugar for taste. You can also create a garlic tea by soaking a clove of garlic in a cup of water.

Did you know?
An item that wards off the living dead is called an Apotropaic. Garlic is a common example of an apotropaic for vampires.
garlic-uses

Vampire folklore has been connected to rabies. Centuries ago, people would be bitten (sometimes by bats) and start to exhibit symptoms such as hypersensitivity to light and garlic. This would cause them to become nocturnal and eventually to have bloody froth at the mouth and at times, bite others. Little understanding of the disease began the folktales of vampires.

De-icer
In 2008, Ankeny, Iowa, must have smelled pretty potent when they used garlic salt to remove ice off the roads. The garlic salt, which was unfit for human consumption, was donated by a local spice producer.

Athlete’s foot
Garlic is also a natural antifungal! You can use it to combat athlete’s foot infections and cut back on the itching. Add a few cloves of garlic to a warm foot bath and soak your feet for 30 minutes.

Cuts and abrasions
You can use garlic to help treat cuts or abrasions. Gently wash the area of the wound with soapy, warm water and pat it dry with a clean cloth. Peel a garlic clove and bruise one side of it by slamming it on the table or an edge. Then gently apply the bruised area against your cut or abrasion for 5-10 minutes. Garlic contains allicin, which inhibits the growth of several kinds of bacteria and protects against infection. If the garlic stings, remove the garlic instantly.

Ear infections
For centuries, people have used garlic’s anti-bacterial qualities to fight infections – including ear infections. Now, don’t chop up a bunch of garlic cloves and jam them down your ear. Instead, crush garlic cloves with a press and place it in a teaspoon of hot olive oil for five minutes. Strain the garlic and allow the oil to cool. Carefully place a few drops of the remedy at a time down your ear canal. You can also purchase garlic oil made for this purpose.

Splinter removal
Splinters are painful to remove and many times you need a quick, easy solution to get the splinter out. Instead of waiting for the piece to remove itself, place a thin slice of garlic over the splinter and hold it in place with a bandage. The garlic will help the skin work the splinter out within a few hours.

How are you using garlic?
What do you use garlic for? Have a great recipe or use for garlic? Comment below and let everyone know!

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TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Fishing Safety Tips

Spending time fishing is wonderful family sport, but in order for it to be enjoyable it should be safe and comfortable especially for small children. Fishing isn’t a dangerous sport, but as with any activity, especially activities held in the ever-changing outdoors conditions do change. Unexpected bad weather, too much time in the sun, or encounter biting insects are a few factors that can spoil a fishing trip. Safety comes first. All the checklists in the world can’t anticipate all of the safety problems you or your young anglers might encounter on a fishing trip. So the best advice is think safety at all times. Look for trouble before it finds you. If it finds you anyway, know how to deal with it.

hiking-first-aid-kitWe recommend to start out to assemble a safety or a boat bag. A small bag that would carry all of the required as necessary essentials on the water or on shore.

  1. First Aid Kit
  2. Chap Stick
  3. Suntan Lotion
  4. Sunburn Crème
  5. Insect Repellent
  6. Insect Bite Treatment
  7. Small Inexpensive Binoculars
  8. Packable Rain Gear or      Ponchos      
  9. Disposable Waterproof Camera
  10. Aspirin or any Required Medications

Keep these important guidelines and tips in mind for a safe fishing experience.

Fishing with small children. Whenever around water shoreline/dock or in a boat children should always wear a properly fitted Coast Guard approved (PFD) personal flotation device. Young anglers need constant adult supervision and guidance, establish a few rules; No running. Before each cast check for people behind and other obstructions. Have patience with small children they have a tendency to be impatient, reward them by allowing to keep a few small small fish in a bucket while fishing keeping their attention.

New anglers. Should always learn how to cast overhead first. This cast teaches the proper technique and is safer than side casts.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAthletic Shoes. Shoes should always be worn, fishing from shore, off a dock or in a boat. Sharp rocks, glass, stray hooks and other objects on the shoreline could cut your feet. On a boat or dock shoes are designed to keep your feet from slipping in a wet boat or off a dock preventing you from taking an unexpected fall into the water.

Prevent Sunburn. Always wear sunscreen, the ultraviolet (UV) light of the sun can do a lot of damage to skin, eyes and lips. Apply sunscreen on youngsters cover face, neck, ears and all other exposed skin with a sun protection factor of 15 or higher.

Wear a billed cap. Hats keep the sun out of your eyes while fishing. They also keep your head cool in the summer and warm in the winter as well as protecting your head from stray cast with hooks.

Sunglasses. Everyone should wear glasses or sunglasses (preferably polarized) Polarized sunglasses protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays reflecting off the water, protect your eyes from errant casts with hooks and allows you to view below the surface of the water to see fish and other objects.

Bring Cold Drinks

During the summer temperatures can get very warm, to avoid dehydration or even heat stroke bring lots of cool water and other healthy drinks, Make sure the youngsters drink plenty of fluids. Liquids are also very important during the fall and winter months.

Kinds-of-Insect-Repellent-1636

Insect Repellent

Keep the pests off by applying insect repellent. Mosquitoes, ticks, bees and other insects not only sting, they can carry diseases. Follow the directions on the container. If your insect repellent contains “Deet,” it may be better to apply it to the clothing instead of the skin.

Bring Appropriate Clothing

Always dress for the weather and be prepared for unexpected changes. As an example it might be 75 degrees on shore but 10 degrees cooler on the lake with wind. Bring along a sweat shirt or a wind breaker just in case.

The listed guidelines below are to recognize and treat some outdoor hazards you may come across this season on the water. Note: The information provided herein should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical matters.

On the Water Safety

Drowning is second only to auto mishaps as the leading cause of death for teens.

Drowning Causes

  • Life jackets not worn.
  • Swimming in lakes or rivers is a LOT harder than      swimming in a pool.
  • Water is cold enough to cool the person so fast that      they can’t swim (Hypothermia).
  • Swimmer’s strength is overpowered by the current or      other factors

Water Safety Precautions

  • Never use alcohol or drugs while you’re swimming, diving, or in a boat.
  • Wear a Coast Guard approved personal flotation device when you boat, raft, go tubing, or swim across the lake.
  • When buying a life jacket or vest, select one that is comfortable, won’t slip, and offers good freedom of movement.
  • Learn CPR and lifesaving, and take refresher courses.
  • Do not chew gum or eat while in the water, to prevent choking.

Water Rescue
Your diving into a lake or river to save potential-drowning victims is NOT recommended.

What to Do
Shout for help. When another person arrives, ask them to phone 911 and then come straight back.
Look around you for something to help the victim. This might be an empty ice chest, a pole, rope, tree limb, soccer ball, or even your spare tire! If a rope tie one end around a tree or post and throw the other end to the victim. Then, crouch down to maintain your balance and pull the victim to safety.

Even professional rescuers virtually NEVER attempt a water rescue without equipment. They bring a rescue tube, rescue board or other buoyant device to the victim.

Lightning Hazards
Lightning can create a sense of awe, excitement, and danger all in one. Most lightning strikes occur between noon and 6 p.m. in the summer.

Basic Precautions
Get an update weather forecast before you go. Develop a plan for emergency shelter If you hear thunder, you are at risk! Go to safe shelter immediately!

Learn CPR and keep your skills current through refresher training. Your CPR may save the life of someone struck by lightning and in cardiac arrest!

Specific-Activity-Advice

Boating
Any projection above the flat surface of the water acts as a potential lighting rod. Do not become a lightning rod!

Don’t be a Target
Try to STAY OFF, and definitely GET OFF the water before a thunderstorm hits. If you are caught in open water during a thunderstorm, stay in the center of the cabin or low in the boat. Disconnect and do not use or touch the boat’s major electronic equipment.

Fishing 
Stop fishing at the first sign of a storm, and get off the lake

Swimming
Get out of the water and seek shelter at the first sigh of a storm.

General  
If caught outdoors and no shelter is available, find a low spot away from trees, fences, power lines, and poles. Squat low to the ground, making yourself the smallest target possible. Minimize contact with the ground. DO NOT lie down! If you are in the woods, take shelter under the lower trees!

Expected Survival Time in Cold Water

Water Temperature Exhaustion or Unconsciousness Expected Survival Time
70-80° F
(21-27° C)
3-12 hours 3 hours – indefinitely
60-70° F
(16-21° C)
2-7 hours 2-40 hours
50-60° F
(10-16° C)
1-2 hours 1-6 hours
40-50° F
(4-10° C)
30-60 minutes 1-3 hours
32.5-40° F
(0-44° C)
15-30 minutes 30-90 minutes
<32° F
(<0° C)
Under 15 minutes Under 15-45 minutes

Sunburn Prevention
Over the years the risk of developing malignant skin cancer has increased by 800%, to the extent that it is now considered to be at epidemic levels. And, 90% of the skin cancers are sun related.

Here is some skin protection guidelines to follow:
Sunscreen is a must! Choose one with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30. This number means that you are protected at least 30 times longer than you are without the sunscreen.

Apply sunscreen about 30 minutes before going out.

  • Be sure that your sunscreen protects against both UVA & UVB rays, and re-apply about every 2 hours.
  • Don’t neglect your sunscreen on a cloudy day. Clouds filter only about 20% of the sun’s ultraviolet rays.
  • Sunblock products containing titanium may offer additional protection and should be applied to your sensitive lips and noise.
  • If you are fishing on a day when the sun is strong, try to limit the amount of bare skin that is exposed. Also a hat should be worn.
  • No sunscreen will protect you completely form the damaging rays of the sun. So, try to minimize outdoor exposures between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. – when the sun’s rays are the strongest.

It is never to late to benefit from protecting your skin from sunburn. Try to avoid additional intense sun exposure to allow your skin to repair some of the damage on its own.

If you should bet sunburned.

  • Take a cool bath or apply wet cloths to the sunburned area.
  • Apply aloe gels or first aid sunburn sprays as needed.
  • Try to limit additional sun exposure by staying cool indoors, or in the shade outdoors while your sunburn heals.

Eye Protection from Glare (Polarized Sunglasses)
During direct exposure to the sun, ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage the unprotected eye. These UV rays are simply invisible light waves that carry more energy than the visible light. People who spend lots of time outdoors without eye protection, especially near the water, will probably experience headaches, eye fatigue, and eventually, cataracts. Brightness and radiation are virtually doubled with reflected sunrays from the water surface! UV radiation has also been linked to a condition called photokeratitis – temporary but painful sunburn of the eye’s surface. With this condition, which may not show effect for 12 – 24 hours, the person awakens in the middle of the night with searing eye pain and a feeling of sand or grit in the eyes.

Wear Your Sunglasses
Any polycarbonate sunglass lens can be expected to provide complete UV protection as well as excellent impact resistance. Also, a voluntary standard, ANSI Z80.3 has been adopted by some manufactures; and their conformance is referenced on some sunglass labels.

Guidelines for Purchasing Sunglasses
Ensure that lenses:

  • Block 99-100% of UVA and UVB rays
  • Screen out 75-90% of visible light
  • Are polarized to minimize reflected glare from snow/water
  • Match perfectly in color and adsorption
  • Have Zylonite (ophthalmic grade plastic) frames
  • Are free from optical distortion and lens flaws
  • Are dark enough so that you can’t see your eyes easily when looking in a mirror with the sunglasses on
  • Preferably are gray. (They do not modify colors)
  • Carry the American Optometry Association seal of acceptance

Insects
Prevention is the best defense against flying or crawling critters that can bite or sting. When your warm weather activities take you outdoors to hike, camp, fish, picnic, or just mow the lawn, you need to be aware of the insect problems that you may encounter.

Experts recommend that you:

Use a quality insect repellent and reapply every 2 -3 hours If your outdoor activities take you to a field or forest, wear light color long pants and long-sleeve shirts. Wear a hat, and working gloves if appropriate

Mosquitoes
These pests live near where water collects, and bay be more prevalent during the late afternoon and evening hours during calm weather. Staying indoors during these times may keep you from getting bit. If you do, scratching may make maters worse. Instead, treat bites with an anti-itch lotion.

Bees
Avoid bee problems by not wearing bright colored clothes or floral cosmetics, and by covering any sweet drinks. If a bee should land on you or your food, either blow or gently brush the bee away. If you are stung, tweezers are useful for removing the stinger. Otherwise, you can probably scrape the stinger off with a credit card or even your fingernail.

Spiders
Although the vast majority of spiders that you will encounter are not harmful, caution and common sense must still be used. Keep any spiders that you see at a safe distance, and wear heavy-duty gloves when working with piles of brush or wood where spiders like to hide.

 

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