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Category Archives: Spinner Rigs

Spinner Rigs Slay Walleye

2seriousdblLGAre you looking for a simple, yet effective walleye bait that is inexpensive and will have you limiting out on Wawang Lake? Look no further, as the spinner rig may be the answer to your prayers. By learning what the rig consists of, how and where to fish it, and the reason why walleye love it so much, you will be on your way to a phenomenal season of fishing – and that’s what each of us wants, isn’t it?

What the Heck is a Spinner Rig?

A spinner rig is quite basic in its design, but do not let that fool you. This bait catches fish! The rig itself is made up of a spinner blade put onto your main line, followed by a few plastic beads. You then attach a short-shanked hook, and sometimes followed by another one a few inches down the line. And there you have it.  Either the double hook rig, or, single hook rig work well, but, with large or long baits a double hook rig is suggested.

sliding sinker bottom rigThe only thing missing is to attach a weight (called a walking sinker) one to four feet up the line from the spinner and you are good to go. A fat, juicy live bait is then hooked once through the head with the first hook, and then hooked halfway down the body by the second hook. This will be what the hungry walleye will key-in on. If this description sounds confusing, don’t let it phase you, as you can purchase pre-made spinner rigs at your local tackle shop for fewer than two dollars.

How to Fish It?

The basic technique for fishing spinner rigs is to slowly troll or drift these baits behind the boat. The walking sinker that is attached to your line will slowly drag on bottom, (most walking sinkers are relatively snag-proof), and, depending on the length of line you left between your weight and hook, will be the distance the rig will run up off the bottom.

Many anglers prefer to slowly drift across productive structure areas pulling spinner rigs, as they can maintain contact at all times with the bottom, (where the walleye like to hang out), and the presentation will be less rushed than a trolling pattern with the big motor would be. This is not to say that you can’t catch walleye by trolling, but the key reason these spinners work is the action and   enticement they offer the walleye at these slow and deliberate speeds.

 

28.5 inch walleye

Experimentation is often your best bet when it comes to choosing blade and bead colors.   Generally, bright colors will get the nod, although I have had days when the simple switch from an orange blade to a yellow one made all the difference.   Since they are an inexpensive bait to buy, or make, I suggest carrying an assortment with different size blades and colors to see which ones attract the wandering walleye best.

Where to Fish It?

Spinner rigs   really shine at a number of specific areas of a lake. Rock shoals and drop-offs are key spots to try as they are walleye magnets, and fish on these spots will generally be relating to the bottom contour – the exact spot these rigs travel. Other spots to try are alongside the edge of weed lines, and through wide-open flats that typically hold walleye. Out in front of dams and alongside current break areas have also been successful areas for me when using these rigs.

wi0703_DeadWalley

Weed cover can foul these baits so it is best to fish them in open water over bottom structure such as sand, gravel or rock. If the sinker does happen to snag, a simple tug will break the “drop line”, leaving your main rig intact.

 

Why Does it Work?

The three main reasons that spinner rigs are so successful in catching walleye are the sight, sound and smell factors they possess. The flash of a spinner whirling   in the water will always grab a fish’s attention. The dirt and sediment kicked up by the walking sinker will accomplish this also. Both of these factors will also cause vibrations and sound in the water column that are attractive to the walleye. Finally, the night crawler is the “ace in the hole”, as any following fish will not be able to resist the smell and taste of that juicy morsel, fluttering through the water.

 

# 1 choice of lure for Lahrman Group 6/2013
  # 1 choice of lure for Lahrman Group for the last 12 years.

Take a   “spin” with this proven rig this season, and see for yourself its fish catching qualities. It may not look like much, but I can assure you that it sure puts a magical spell on the resident walleye.

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CHASING THE ‘EYES’

???????????????????????????????More people want to know how to catch walleye than any other game fish.  Also known as pickerel, they are often difficult to locate and land. The challenge they present makes fishing them successfully an angling accomplishment.  Yet, for the novice angler finding a lake that has a fisheries management program will without a doubt help you get on those walleye quicker.  So Wawang Lake is where you’ll want to begin.

So it doesn’t hurt to have a few tricks up your sleeve when you head out on the water this season. Early season walleye are best located in shallow waters as they are not long out of spawning and are looking to stock up on feed to replace what was lost as they were preoccupied during the spawn. Shoals with gravel are excellent places to start looking, especially near the drop off to deeper water.

Quite often you will be able to visually spot them in these areas as the water is generally clearer and the walleye will stand out against the gravel bottom. In the water you are fishing, look for the edges of weed beds with a change in depth. This can be in a narrows were the deeper part of the water slopes up toward the bank, or on a bend off a point on the inside of the turn near a sand bar, walleye will be on the edge of these areas. The current is slower here and is a good place for harboring bait and acts like a snack table for feeding fish.

Sunken islands in the lake work well as do old break lines, humps and reefs. If you search the water that you will be fishing in, you should not have too much trouble locating these types of spots.  At Wawang Lake we provide a detailed, contour map of the lake that gets our guests started in the right direction almost immediately.  Supper isn’t too far behind.

Several types of baits work well for walleye. Favorites are crank-baits. Rapalas (straight or jointed) (floating or sinking) (suspending or rattle types). Next are the walleye divers, which imitate baitfish so accurately that walleye can’t resist them if presented properly.
Start using these baits with a stop motion, jerking the bait through the water instead of steady retrieves. Suspending lures are fished in the same manner, letting them sink to the bottom and then start jerking softly about a foot or so at a time. This allows the bait to sink slowly again to a predetermined depth before being tugged forward and up again. This motion represents smaller food chain species chasing and feeding which will attract larger fish and cause them to feed on the smaller fish.

Wawang catch

If fishing is more what you are after rather than angling try using minnows or leeches. Keep the leech stretched out as long as you can without ripping it.  Use a pickerel rig and hook a second hook to each. Do this by placing the second hook over the barb on the first hook and letting it trail.

Now you can hook the leech on the first hook and pull the tail down over the second hook. A bigger leech is more inviting than a small rounded one. Be sure not to have more than four hooks in total on your rig!

For trolling spinners or jigs with a larger hook use minnows and choose a medium to large minnow. Hook through the mouth, then out the gill, turn the hook then hook through the top of the head just infront of the doral fin.   This allows the minnow to swim freely and walleye often will mouth the bait, turning it and playing with it before swallowing it. Watch closely for light taps on your rod or float, and be prepared to set the hook at this point.

If trolling or cast retrieving is your preference then try using a three-way swivel on your line with the bait trailing, and the center swivel used to attach the weight. Do this by tying on about one foot of lighter line to the bottom eye of the swivel. The lighter line will break off easier in the event of a snag, saving the rest of the line. I use about four feet of line from the swivel to the bait, giving the bait lots of freedom to move side to side or up and down when retrieving the cast or trolling.

August Fishing Provides GREAT Results!

August Fishing Provides GREAT Results!

The foregoing methods are pretty much fail safe, but it remains that walleye are as challenging to fish as they are good to eat. So the best advice is to get out there and try it for yourself. Enjoy the day and the fishing will fall into place!

Join us at Wawang Lake Resort for some GREAT FISHING!!

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The Spin Crazy Pike – When To Use Them

Adam
The #5 Mepps’ steady throb pulsed through the 30-pound spiderwire, down the length of the medium/heavy-action graphite rod and directly into the anglers hand. Just as the lure reached the edge of the cabbage weeds, the blade’s thrum came to an abrupt halt.  He set the hook hard into what felt like a concrete wall! But then the wall began to move, and he knew it was into a trophy. Five minutes and four desperate boatside runs later, he boated the 20-pound northern pike.images

Big pike LOVE spinners!

Weeds are the keys to spinning big pike crazy as these predators use vegetation to ambush any aquatic creature smaller than themselves.

The Baits

Spinner choices abound, but not all are created equal when it comes to enticing jumbo “scissorbills.” The angler should select certain sizes, shapes, and colors, over others.

imagesCAL1L4BOLesson No. 1 in choosing spinners for Esox lucius: bigger always is better. Pick magnum-sized offerings as even hammer-handles attack huge lures with abandon, and to catch true monsters, you MUST have that big profile.

Fat, deeply cupped blades throw out big vibrations that ring the dinner bell for monster pike. While sometimes thinner shaped blades (such as willow-leafs) that spin faster turn the trick; usually the slower-turning Colorado-type blades prove to be the ticket to a pike bonanza.

Because big flash stimulates lunkers, polished silver and gold blades work great.   Another killer color combo is orange blades with a black trailer.

In-Line vs. Offset Spinners

Spinners for northerns come in two basic designs, and both work effectively, but each has its strengths and weaknesses.

Terminator

Terminator

Rooster%20tail%201_18In-line spinners (such as Mepps, Worden’s Lures Rooster Tails, Panther Martin, and Blue Fox’s Vibrax), with their terminal trebles, have higher hook-up and catch rates than their safety-pin brethren, but they also hook vegetation and other underwater structure, too.

But lures such as Terminators and Stanley Jigs’ Rick Clunn 4-Blade Willow Spinnerbaits, with their single, upturned hooks surrounded by   manmade skirts, slither through the weeds, logs and stumps. In-lines also cast like bullets, while offsets can catch the wind and lose momentum.

Line, Leaders

Any of the new “super-lines” such as like Berkley FireLine, Spiderwire Fusion, or Remington’s Power-Lokt, are superior to monofilament for spinning pike angling. Their low stretch and high-abrasion resistance benefit pike anglers.

One suggestion is to flout convention and tie on a snap/swivel instead of a leader because leaders inhibit action and deter wary trophies, while the snap swivels provide two major benefits: quick lure changes and   eliminating/reducing line twist. True, you’ll lose lures to the razor-sharp choppers of aggressive mounters, but you’ll get lots more bites without leaders!

41.5" northern pike

41.5″ northern pike

Speed & Delivery

Often northerns will attack even jet-powered offerings, but slowing down, pausing, or herky-jerkying that spinner, especially when it reaches the “Pike Zone,” reaps big rewards. Even lazy fish will smash a spinnerbait dangled in front on their out-sized mouth.

Always cast beyond where you think the pike lurk, because while “scissorbills” are legendary for their aggressiveness, they don’t like being bombed. Landing a bait on top of one’s head will likely result in spooking it.

Spin-Crazy Times & Spots

Primetime for driving pike spin crazy depends upon the season, time of day, and prevailing weather conditions. Early spring, right  after ice out, brings spawned out northern pike shoreward (where they’re most  vulnerable). Spinner rigs elicit savage strikes from hungry pike during spring.

graph-weed-pikeINFS-110026-WEATH-05a

Because northerns sight-feed, mid-day piking makes sense.   Following that logic, clear, blue-sky days with lots of sun create perfect pike angling weather.

The spinner’s flash and large profile, easily visible to cruising whoppers, prove irresistible.


Look for inlets and concentrate your efforts just off the edges of weedy drop-offs. Weeds are the keys to spinning  big pike crazy, as these predators use vegetation to ambush any aquatic creature smaller than themselves. Position the boat on the deep side of the drop-off, and cast the spinner up onto the flat itself, cranking just fast   enough to keep the lure above the weeds, and pause when you get to the weed edge. Allow the bait to drift down and find the waiting lunkers, and hang on!

Using spinners to drive northern pike stir crazy is fun, easy, and productive.

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CHASING THE ‘EYES’

 

31" walleye - Mark HechtMore people want to know how to catch walleye than any other game fish.  Also known as pickerel, they are often difficult to locate and land. The challenge they present makes fishing them successfully an angling accomplishment.  Yet, for the novice angler finding a lake that has a fisheries management program will without a doubt help you get on those walleye quicker.  So Wawang Lake is where you’ll want to begin.

So it doesn’t hurt to have a few tricks up your sleeve when you head out on the water this season. Early season walleye are best located in shallow waters as they are not long out of spawning and are looking to stock up on feed to replace what was lost as they were preoccupied during the spawn. Shoals with gravel are excellent places to start looking, especially near the drop off to deeper water.

walleye schoolQuite often you will be able to visually spot them in these areas as the water is generally clearer and the walleye will stand out against the gravel bottom. In the water you are fishing, look for the edges of weed beds with a change in depth. This can be in a narrows were the deeper part of the water slopes up toward the bank, or on a bend off a point on the inside of the turn near a sand bar, walleye will be on the edge of these areas. The current is slower here and is a good place for harboring bait and acts like a snack table for feeding fish.

Sunken islands in the lake work well as do old break lines, humps and reefs. If you search the water that you will be fishing in, you should not have too much trouble locating these types of spots.  At Wawang Lake we provide a detailed, contour map of the lake that gets our guests started in the right direction almost immediately.  Supper isn’t too far behind.

Several types of baits work well for walleye. Favorites are crank-baits. Rapalas (straight or jointed) (floating or sinking) (suspending or rattle types). Next are the walleye divers, which imitate baitfish so accurately that walleye can’t resist them if presented properly.

illustration
Start using these baits with a stop motion, jerking the bait through the water instead of steady retrieves. Suspending lures are fished in the same manner, letting them sink to the bottom and then start jerking softly about a foot or so at a time. This allows the bait to sink slowly again to a predetermined depth before being tugged forward and up again. This motion represents smaller food chain species chasing and feeding which will attract larger fish and cause them to feed on the smaller fish.
Vertical jigging - 1
If fishing is more what you are after rather than angling try using minnows or leeches. Keep the leech stretched out as long as you can without ripping it.  Use a pickerel rig and hook a second hook to each. Do this by placing the second hook over the barb on the first hook and letting it trail.

Now you can hook the leech on the first hook and pull the tail down over the second hook. A bigger leech is more inviting than a small rounded one. Be sure not to have more than four hooks in total on your rig!

For trolling spinners or jigs with a larger hook use minnows and choose a medium to large minnow. Hook through the mouth, then out the gill, turn the hook then hook through the top of the head just infront of the doral fin.   This allows the minnow to swim freely and walleye often will mouth the bait, turning it and playing with it before swallowing it. Watch closely for light taps on your rod or float, and be prepared to set the hook at this point.

3 WAY

If trolling or cast retrieving is your preference then try using a three-way swivel on your line with the bait trailing, and the center swivel used to attach the weight. Do this by tying on about one foot of lighter line to the bottom eye of the swivel. The lighter line will break off easier in the event of a snag, saving the rest of the line. I use about four feet of line from the swivel to the bait, giving the bait lots of freedom to move side to side or up and down when retrieving the cast or trolling.

walleye_catch

The foregoing methods are pretty much fail safe, but it remains that walleye are as challenging to fish as they are good to eat. So the best advice is to get out there and try it for yourself. Enjoy the day and the fishing will fall into place!

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
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The Best Lures for Northern Pike

DSCN4408

luresNorthern pike are exceptional game fish, known for their propensity to hit lures with heart-stopping ferocity and to engage in epic battles once hooked. But northern pike can also be finicky, so being well-prepared with a variety of lures increases your chances for success. An assortment of spoons, spinners, crankbaits and topwater lures should be in the arsenal of every northern pike angler.

Spoons

imagesCACC7OPN

Spoons are most effective because of their wiggling, vibrating movement in the water and the flashes of light that reflect off their metal surfaces. Spoons come in all manner of shapes, sizes and colors, but a good fundamental choice is a spoon of about 4 to 6 inches in length. The color to use varies with water clarity, but, according to “Game and Fish” magazine, red and white spoons are often the best combination to start with. The weight of the spoon determines the depth at which it runs. Heavier, thicker spoons sink faster and run deeper. They are also the best choice for trolling. Dardevle spoons, made by Eppinger, have long been a top choice for anglers. Spoons are generally used with a cast-and-retrieve routine or are trolled, but they are versatile enough to use as jigs or, when retrieved quickly, as surface lures.

Spinnerbaits

spinner-bait-diagram
Spinnerbaits are effective because of the fish-attracting vibrations and light flashes they create when retrieved or trolled. Spinners consist of shiny metal blades with a clevis that spins around a wire shaft. Spinnerbaits often are “dressed” in hair (bucktails), feathers, rubber or fur to increase their attractiveness to northern pike. Anglers often add a soft, plastic-bodied, twister tail, either as a trailer hook (to catch short-striking northerns) or to the treble hook itself. Mepps makes high-quality spinnerbaits in a huge variety of sizes, shapes and variations.

Crankbaits

imagesCAQ2U1JD

Crankbaits are lures designed to resemble bait fish, and you can fish them either by casting and retrieving or trolling behind the boat. Some are designed to run shallow, and some run deep. The experts at Pike Lures.com comment that the majority of crankbaits are manufactured out of plastic, but some companies still use the traditional wooden bodies. Either is a good choice. Generally, a crankbait is painted with a pattern and color that closely matches that of the species upon which the pike feeds, but, sometimes, a wild and unnatural color works even better. Rapala is one of the premier makers of crankbaits, available in either wood or plastic, in a wide variety of sizes and shapes.

Topwater

imagesCAQL6WK0
Topwater lures are about the most exciting type of lure to use for northern pike fishing. Topwaters are designed to create surface commotion, in imitation of a dying fish or swimming animal. Northerns hit these lures explosively at the surface, creating a large and startling splash. Stickbaits, buzzbaits, propeller baits and crawlers are typical variations on the topwater theme, with movement dictated by the angler’s manipulation of the fishing rod. Heddon Company has made such lures since 1894 and continues to produce popular and effective topwater lures.

 

Join us at Wawang Lake Resort for some OUTSTANDING fishing!

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Spinner Rigs Slay Walleye

2seriousdblLGAre you looking for a simple, yet effective walleye bait that is inexpensive and will have you limiting out on Wawang Lake? Look no further, as the spinner rig may be the answer to your prayers. By learning what the rig consists of, how and where to fish it, and the reason why walleye love it so much, you will be on your way to a phenomenal season of fishing – and that’s what each of us wants, isn’t it?

What the Heck is a Spinner Rig?

A spinner rig is quite basic in its design, but do not let that fool you. This bait catches fish! The rig itself is made up of a spinner blade put onto your main line, followed by a few plastic beads. You then attach a short-shanked hook, and sometimes followed by another one a few inches down the line. And there you have it.  Either the double hook rig, or, single hook rig work well, but, with large or long baits a double hook rig is suggested.

sliding sinker bottom rigThe only thing missing is to attach a weight (called a walking sinker) one to four feet up the line from the spinner and you are good to go. A fat, juicy live bait is then hooked once through the head with the first hook, and then hooked halfway down the body by the second hook. This will be what the hungry walleye will key-in on. If this description sounds confusing, don’t let it phase you, as you can purchase pre-made spinner rigs at your local tackle shop for fewer than two dollars.

How to Fish It?

The basic technique for fishing spinner rigs is to slowly troll or drift these baits behind the boat. The walking sinker that is attached to your line will slowly drag on bottom, (most walking sinkers are relatively snag-proof), and, depending on the length of line you left between your weight and hook, will be the distance the rig will run up off the bottom.

Many anglers prefer to slowly drift across productive structure areas pulling spinner rigs, as they can maintain contact at all times with the bottom, (where the walleye like to hang out), and the presentation will be less rushed than a trolling pattern with the big motor would be. This is not to say that you can’t catch walleye by trolling, but the key reason these spinners work is the action and   enticement they offer the walleye at these slow and deliberate speeds.

Experimentation is often your best bet when it comes to choosing blade and bead colors.   Generally, bright colors will get the nod, although I have had days when the simple switch from an orange blade to a yellow one made all the difference.   Since they are an inexpensive bait to buy, or make, I suggest carrying an assortment with different size blades and colors to see which ones attract the wandering walleye best.

Where to Fish It?

wi0703_DeadWalleySpinner rigs   really shine at a number of specific areas of a lake. Rock shoals and drop-offs are key spots to try as they are walleye magnets, and fish on these spots will generally be relating to the bottom contour – the exact spot these rigs travel. Other spots to try are alongside the edge of weed lines, and through wide-open flats that typically hold walleye. Out in front of dams and alongside current break areas have also been successful areas for me when using these rigs.

 

Weed cover can foul these baits so it is best to fish them in open water over bottom structure such as sand, gravel or rock. If the sinker does happen to snag, a simple tug will break the “drop line”, leaving your main rig intact.

Why Does it Work?

The three main reasons that spinner rigs are so successful in catching walleye are the sight, sound and smell factors they possess. The flash of a spinner whirling   in the water will always grab a fish’s attention. The dirt and sediment kicked up by the walking sinker will accomplish this also. Both of these factors will also cause vibrations and sound in the water column that are attractive to the walleye. Finally, the night crawler is the “ace in the hole”, as any following fish will not be able to resist the smell and taste of that juicy morsel, fluttering through the water.

# 1 choice of lure for Lahrman Group 6/2013
# 1 choice of lure for Lahrman Group for the last 12 years.

Take a   “spin” with this proven rig this season, and see for yourself its fish catching qualities. It may not look like much, but I can assure you that it sure puts a magical spell on the resident walleye.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

CHASING THE ‘EYES’

 

31" walleye - Mark HechtMore people want to know how to catch walleye than any other game fish.  Also known as pickerel, they are often difficult to locate and land. The challenge they present makes fishing them successfully an angling accomplishment.  Yet, for the novice angler finding a lake that has a fisheries management program will without a doubt help you get on those walleye quicker.  So Wawang Lake is where you’ll want to begin.

So it doesn’t hurt to have a few tricks up your sleeve when you head out on the water this season. Early season walleye are best located in shallow waters as they are not long out of spawning and are looking to stock up on feed to replace what was lost as they were preoccupied during the spawn. Shoals with gravel are excellent places to start looking, especially near the drop off to deeper water.

walleye schoolQuite often you will be able to visually spot them in these areas as the water is generally clearer and the walleye will stand out against the gravel bottom. In the water you are fishing, look for the edges of weed beds with a change in depth. This can be in a narrows were the deeper part of the water slopes up toward the bank, or on a bend off a point on the inside of the turn near a sand bar, walleye will be on the edge of these areas. The current is slower here and is a good place for harboring bait and acts like a snack table for feeding fish.

Sunken islands in the lake work well as do old break lines, humps and reefs. If you search the water that you will be fishing in, you should not have too much trouble locating these types of spots.  At Wawang Lake we provide a detailed, contour map of the lake that gets our guests started in the right direction almost immediately.  Supper isn’t too far behind.

Several types of baits work well for walleye. Favorites are crank-baits. Rapalas (straight or jointed) (floating or sinking) (suspending or rattle types). Next are the walleye divers, which imitate baitfish so accurately that walleye can’t resist them if presented properly.

illustration
Start using these baits with a stop motion, jerking the bait through the water instead of steady retrieves. Suspending lures are fished in the same manner, letting them sink to the bottom and then start jerking softly about a foot or so at a time. This allows the bait to sink slowly again to a predetermined depth before being tugged forward and up again. This motion represents smaller food chain species chasing and feeding which will attract larger fish and cause them to feed on the smaller fish.
Vertical jigging - 1
If fishing is more what you are after rather than angling try using minnows or leeches. Keep the leech stretched out as long as you can without ripping it.  Use a pickerel rig and hook a second hook to each. Do this by placing the second hook over the barb on the first hook and letting it trail.

Now you can hook the leech on the first hook and pull the tail down over the second hook. A bigger leech is more inviting than a small rounded one. Be sure not to have more than four hooks in total on your rig!

For trolling spinners or jigs with a larger hook use minnows and choose a medium to large minnow. Hook through the mouth, then out the gill, turn the hook then hook through the top of the head just infront of the doral fin.   This allows the minnow to swim freely and walleye often will mouth the bait, turning it and playing with it before swallowing it. Watch closely for light taps on your rod or float, and be prepared to set the hook at this point.

3 WAY

If trolling or cast retrieving is your preference then try using a three-way swivel on your line with the bait trailing, and the center swivel used to attach the weight. Do this by tying on about one foot of lighter line to the bottom eye of the swivel. The lighter line will break off easier in the event of a snag, saving the rest of the line. I use about four feet of line from the swivel to the bait, giving the bait lots of freedom to move side to side or up and down when retrieving the cast or trolling.

walleye_catch

 

The foregoing methods are pretty much fail safe, but it remains that walleye are as challenging to fish as they are good to eat. So the best advice is to get out there and try it for yourself. Enjoy the day and the fishing will fall into place!

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Using Minnows to Catch Walleye

Many of you have probably fished for walleye using live minnows and found that they didn’t stay on the hook for long or died fairly quickly. Let’s see if we can fix these problems.

Jackie Hayden 25.5 inch walleye

SHARP HOOKS……
First of all you want to make sure the hooks that you are using are not too large for the minnow, and secondly, that they are sharp. A small hone or sometimes a good nail file will touch up the points on hooks enough to penetrate a minnow or a walleyes mouth without a problem. Placing the hook against the top of a fingernail will tell you if it is sharp. If it seems to stick to the nail under its own weight, then the hook is sharp. Hook sizes 2/0 3/0 and 4/0 are preferred choices.

SPINNER RIG, single hook……
182Spinner rigs can be used for live minnow presentation if you hook the minnow in the mouth, out through the gill and then turn the hook back around through the top of the minnows back just in front of the dorsal fin, but, be sure not to break the backbone of the minnow. This allows the minnow to look natural in the water and still get oxygen through the gills. When trolled or retrieved it will not be as apt to pull off the hook. Being in a natural position in the water the walleye have a better chance of taking it as part of its feed. Some make their own rigs for this type of fishing, use only one hook on the rig and experiment with different colored beads. A #5 blade is my choice to start with and if it works well, leave it, otherwise go to a bit larger blade. Use a different color bead at the hook, usually yellow or green.

castingThis seems to entice the walleye a little more and usually results in a good hook set. If the area you are fishing supports a good concentration of walleye, then try using a simple rig consisting of a small bell sinker on bottom ¼ or 3/8 oz. and two hooks set about eight inches apart on the line. Place the first hook within two inches of bottom and the second about eight inches above the first. Tip both with a medium size live minnow as suggested as above. Keep a snug line or use a float, but keep in mind that walleye will usually bite softly. A small amount of movement on the float or rod tip is your cue to set the hook. Do this by dropping the rod tip slightly and waiting for one more little tug on the line, then set the hook. This method works well from a boat while sitting over a hole inhabited by walleye. Also, you can practice a slow retrieve to cover just a bit more water.

Another productive method is to use only one hook and a live minnow, with a small sinker about one foot above the hook, allowing the minnow to float up, just off bottom. This is a favorite for just plain lazy cast and retrieve. Dont try to get too much distance on the cast as you will tear the minnow off the hook with the fast flicking motion of the rod. A slow retrieve works best and the minnow brings a lot of curious walleye to the bait.

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Slow down and enjoy……
Not everybody enjoys the hectic pace of covering an entire lake or at fast speed looking for constant action and throwing hooks at the rate of lightning flashes. So on your next trip out on the lake, slow down, relax and thoroughly enjoy the fishing time. That’s what it’s all about!

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The Spin Crazy Pike – When To Use Them

Wawang Pike Kelly
The #5 Mepps’ steady throb pulsed through the 30-pound spiderwire, down the length of the medium/heavy-action graphite rod and directly into the anglers hand. Just as the lure reached the edge of the cabbage weeds, the blade’s thrum came to an abrupt halt.  He set the hook hard into what felt like a concrete wall! But then the wall began to move, and he knew it was into a trophy. Five minutes and four desperate boatside runs later, he boated the 20-pound northern pike.images

Big pike LOVE spinners!

Weeds are the keys to spinning big pike crazy as these predators use vegetation to ambush any aquatic creature smaller than themselves.

The Baits

Spinner choices abound, but not all are created equal when it comes to enticing jumbo “scissorbills.” The angler should select certain sizes, shapes, and colors, over others.

imagesCAL1L4BOLesson No. 1 in choosing spinners for Esox lucius: bigger always is better. Pick magnum-sized offerings as even hammer-handles attack huge lures with abandon, and to catch true monsters, you MUST have that big profile.

Fat, deeply cupped blades throw out big vibrations that ring the dinner bell for monster pike. While sometimes thinner shaped blades (such as willow-leafs) that spin faster turn the trick; usually the slower-turning Colorado-type blades prove to be the ticket to a pike bonanza.

Because big flash stimulates lunkers, polished silver and gold blades work great.   Another killer color combo is orange blades with a black trailer.

In-Line vs. Offset Spinners

Spinners for northerns come in two basic designs, and both work effectively, but each has its strengths and weaknesses.

Terminator

Terminator

Rooster%20tail%201_18In-line spinners (such as Mepps, Worden’s Lures Rooster Tails, Panther Martin, and Blue Fox’s Vibrax), with their terminal trebles, have higher hook-up and catch rates than their safety-pin brethren, but they also hook vegetation and other underwater structure, too.

But lures such as Terminators and Stanley Jigs’ Rick Clunn 4-Blade Willow Spinnerbaits, with their single, upturned hooks surrounded by   manmade skirts, slither through the weeds, logs and stumps. In-lines also cast like bullets, while offsets can catch the wind and lose momentum.

Line, Leaders

Any of the new “super-lines” such as like Berkley FireLine, Spiderwire Fusion, or Remington’s Power-Lokt, are superior to monofilament for spinning pike angling. Their low stretch and high-abrasion resistance benefit pike anglers.

One suggestion is to flout convention and tie on a snap/swivel instead of a leader because leaders inhibit action and deter wary trophies, while the snap swivels provide two major benefits: quick lure changes and   eliminating/reducing line twist. True, you’ll lose lures to the razor-sharp choppers of aggressive mounters, but you’ll get lots more bites without leaders!

Wawang Lake northern pike (2)Speed & Delivery

Often northerns will attack even jet-powered offerings, but slowing down, pausing, or herky-jerkying that spinner, especially when it reaches the “Pike Zone,” reaps big rewards. Even lazy fish will smash a spinnerbait dangled in front on their out-sized mouth.

Always cast beyond where you think the pike lurk, because while “scissorbills” are legendary for their aggressiveness, they don’t like being bombed. Landing a bait on top of one’s head will likely result in spooking it.

Spin-Crazy Times & Spots

Primetime for driving pike spin crazy depends upon the season, time of day, and prevailing weather conditions. Early spring, right  after ice out, brings spawned out northern pike shoreward (where they’re most  vulnerable). Spinner rigs elicit savage strikes from hungry pike during spring.

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Because northerns sight-feed, mid-day piking makes sense.   Following that logic, clear, blue-sky days with lots of sun create perfect pike angling weather.

The spinner’s flash and large profile, easily visible to cruising whoppers, prove irresistible.


Look for inlets and concentrate your efforts just off the edges of weedy drop-offs. Weeds are the keys to spinning  big pike crazy, as these predators use vegetation to ambush any aquatic creature smaller than themselves. Position the boat on the deep side of the drop-off, and cast the spinner up onto the flat itself, cranking just fast   enough to keep the lure above the weeds, and pause when you get to the weed edge. Allow the bait to drift down and find the waiting lunkers, and hang on!

Using spinners to drive northern pike stir crazy is fun, easy, and productive.

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The Best Lures for Northern Pike

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luresNorthern pike are exceptional game fish, known for their propensity to hit lures with heart-stopping ferocity and to engage in epic battles once hooked. But northern pike can also be finicky, so being well-prepared with a variety of lures increases your chances for success. An assortment of spoons, spinners, crankbaits and topwater lures should be in the arsenal of every northern pike angler.

Spoons

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Spoons are most effective because of their wiggling, vibrating movement in the water and the flashes of light that reflect off their metal surfaces. Spoons come in all manner of shapes, sizes and colors, but a good fundamental choice is a spoon of about 4 to 6 inches in length. The color to use varies with water clarity, but, according to “Game and Fish” magazine, red and white spoons are often the best combination to start with. The weight of the spoon determines the depth at which it runs. Heavier, thicker spoons sink faster and run deeper. They are also the best choice for trolling. Dardevle spoons, made by Eppinger, have long been a top choice for anglers. Spoons are generally used with a cast-and-retrieve routine or are trolled, but they are versatile enough to use as jigs or, when retrieved quickly, as surface lures.

Spinnerbaits

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Spinnerbaits are effective because of the fish-attracting vibrations and light flashes they create when retrieved or trolled. Spinners consist of shiny metal blades with a clevis that spins around a wire shaft. Spinnerbaits often are “dressed” in hair (bucktails), feathers, rubber or fur to increase their attractiveness to northern pike. Anglers often add a soft, plastic-bodied, twister tail, either as a trailer hook (to catch short-striking northerns) or to the treble hook itself. Mepps makes high-quality spinnerbaits in a huge variety of sizes, shapes and variations.

Crankbaits

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Crankbaits are lures designed to resemble bait fish, and you can fish them either by casting and retrieving or trolling behind the boat. Some are designed to run shallow, and some run deep. The experts at Pike Lures.com comment that the majority of crankbaits are manufactured out of plastic, but some companies still use the traditional wooden bodies. Either is a good choice. Generally, a crankbait is painted with a pattern and color that closely matches that of the species upon which the pike feeds, but, sometimes, a wild and unnatural color works even better. Rapala is one of the premier makers of crankbaits, available in either wood or plastic, in a wide variety of sizes and shapes.

Topwater

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Topwater lures are about the most exciting type of lure to use for northern pike fishing. Topwaters are designed to create surface commotion, in imitation of a dying fish or swimming animal. Northerns hit these lures explosively at the surface, creating a large and startling splash. Stickbaits, buzzbaits, propeller baits and crawlers are typical variations on the topwater theme, with movement dictated by the angler’s manipulation of the fishing rod. Heddon Company has made such lures since 1894 and continues to produce popular and effective topwater lures.

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