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Category Archives: Wildlife viewing

About Wawang Lake

cabinsc1c4 [640x480]
No Other Resorts, Homes or Cottages on our lake – just us & YOU!  As a matter of fact our nearest neighbors are 28 miles south of us.  Our post office is further yet at 50 miles south of us.  So if you’re getting the impression we are secluded – you would be right.

Terry came to this magnificent area in 1969 and I soon followed a few years later.  One day he said to me, “We should build a resort’.  What he didn’t know about me and soon would learn is that when I have a goal – I’m relentless and will see it through.  So – Wawang Lake Resort is here today because of our efforts and shear determination –  it couldn’t be any other way..

Now let me tell you a little about our lake and our resort…….

Wawang Lake is a 5,000 acre spring fed lake with  miles of  irregular shoreline,  which offers  the fisherman great fish  habitat to explore, such as sandbars, shoals,  weed beds and  islands and many of these areas are adjacent to deep water making them attractive and popular fishing spots for both walleye and pike & perfect  for exciting  fishing for the fisherman.

Our  lake is  easy to navigate and offers a variety of lake structure that is excellent  for both walleye and northern pike and better yet it’s nearly stress free for mishaps for those that bring their own boats.

IMG_0037
We have seven cabins that have a spectacular view of our magnificent lake.  You  will  be sure  to enjoy the beauty  of our 1,500′ tropical like beach with gradual incline, and, the resort’s shoreline bottom is all sand for an afternoon swim or just relax tanning on the beach.  Our lake also has many other sand beaches that are  perfect for a private swim, or the traditional shore lunch.

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Upon your arrival we offer a detailed map of the lake and will highlight areas showing where the successful fishing has been prior to your arrival.   Our main objective for the angler is to catch fish.  Our main objective for the hunter is to be successful.

New Wawang Lake Map2 (2)
Wawang Lake is well-known for its trophy sized walleye and northern and over the years has brought many great memories of the action and the numbers of these large fish have offered.  For instance, the largest walleye  caught & released was 37”  15 1/2 lb, and, the largest northern also caught & released was 52.5”  38 1/2 lb.  Guests have stated that they have caught and released many trophy fish during their stay in fact our records show that one guest caught over 40 trophy fish in three visits to Wawang Lake.  Nice!

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Canadian Marten (sable)

????????????????????????????????????????The Marten is active about 16 hours a day during the spring and summer.

It is an agile climber but takes almost all its prey on the ground.

They exemplify curiosity, ferocity, and lightning-fast reflexes of the weasel family.

The Marten is known for its beautiful coat that is marketed as Canadian or American sable and generally commands a high price

The marten is a common animal at Wawang Lake and its a treat when our guests get an opportunity to see one.  It is a small predator, and a member of the weasel family. It is similar in size to a small cat but has shorter legs, a more slender body, a bushy tail, and a pointed face. The fur varies from pale yellowish buff to dark blackish brown. During winter, the marten has a beautiful dark brown fur coat and a bright orange throat patch. The summer coat is lighter in colour and not nearly as thick.

The Mustelidae family also includes several other more familiar animals such as the ermine, skunk, and mink. It is thought that martens entered North America from Asia about 60 000 years ago. There are several species of martens worldwide and perhaps the most famous is the Russian sable, which is well known for its luxurious fur.

martenSigns and sounds
In winter, the soles of a marten’s feet are covered with fur and the toes are not distinguishable in the tracks. Tracks are about 3.7 cm long and form two ovals that overlap by about one third. This happens because martens travel with a loping sort of gait, and the hind feet land in the tracks left by the front feet. Loping is common among mustelids, and it takes some practice to be able to distinguish the tracks of the various species.

Habitat and Habits
Martens prefer old growth coniferous or mixed woods forest, although they may seek food in some open areas. However, the amount of undisturbed forest is continually diminishing, and new-growth forests do not support as many marten as the original forest did. In northern Ontario, for example, the density of marten in forests logged 10 to 50 years ago is only 10 to 30 percent of the number in uncut areas. Loss of habitat has contributed in a major way to the decline in abundance of this species in North America. There is some indication that martens may tolerate partial logging of their habitat, but this needs more study and a cooperative multiple use management program for forested lands.

imagesCA50BXP6The marten is a solitary animal. Adults will maintain living areas—called home ranges—by keeping out other members of the same sex while tolerating members of the opposite sex. Males and females spend time together only during the mating season. Home ranges vary in size with changes in both the marten population and the abundance of food. When food is abundant a male’s range is about 3.5 km; if food is scarce this size may double. Females require only about half the area needed by males. Home ranges in logged areas are also much larger than those in uncut forest.

Marten hunt at all times of the day in spring and summer and are most active at daybreak and dusk. During these seasons they are active for about 16 hours a day. Females with young in the den are only active during the day for about six to eight hours. As the temperatures drop, marten are increasingly less active at night. During the coldest months they may hunt for only a few hours in the warmest part of the day. If the weather turns stormy and very cold they may even den up for several days.

Unique characteristics
Curious and excitable, martens hunt by investigating underneath downed trees and stumps, inside hollow trees, and in dense clumps of young conifers. In winter, they are known to hunt beneath the snow in tunnels created by red squirrels or under snow-covered logs. Loggers often see them near their camps, and a stolen lunch bag is not unheard of. The marten exemplifies the curiosity, ferocity, and lightning-fast reflexes of the weasel family.  Marten are known not to be fond of water. However, swimming martens have been seen, although they travelled only a short distance.
imagesCAED1191Feeding
The marten is often described as an “arboreal predator,” but this is inaccurate. The misconception probably arose from the fact that martens are seen in trees where they have climbed to escape an intruder. Martens are agile climbers but take almost all their prey on the ground. They have an extremely varied diet and are classed as generalized predators; that is, they will eat whatever they can catch. Mostly they feed on mice, voles, hare, grouse, squirrels, and shrews. They are also known to take birds’ eggs and amphibians and make extensive use of berries, especially raspberries and blueberries.

imagesCAGQS5FWBreeding
Male and female martens spend time together only during the mating season in late July and early August. The female rears the young alone. Litter size is reported to range from two to six but is most often three, and the young are born in March or April, eight or nine months after mating.

This is an abnormally long gestation, or pregnancy, period for a small mammal and results from a phenomenon known as delayed implantation. After mating and fertilization, development of the embryo stops at a very early stage. Implantation into the uterus wall does not take place until February. Delayed implantation occurs in several other members of the Mustelidae family as well.

imagesCA25RVGNThe young are born in a den, usually located inside a hollow tree. At birth, they weigh about 30 g, are blind, and are covered with a very fine fur. The female nurses the young well into the summer, spending little time away from the den until the young leave with her in June or July. Raising the young is an extremely energy-demanding task, and the female may lose considerable weight during this period. The kits apparently stay with their mother until late August or September, when they disperse. Females may breed in their first year, but most do not breed until they are two years old.  Males are probably not capable of breeding until their second year either.

 

 

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About Wawang Lake

About

cabinsc1c4 [640x480]
No Other Resorts, Homes or Cottages on our lake – just us & YOU!  As a matter of fact our nearest neighbors are 28 miles south of us.  Our post office is further yet at 50 miles south of us.  So if you’re getting the impression we are secluded – you would be right.

Terry came to this magnificent area in 1969 and I soon followed a few years later.  One day he said to me, “We should build a resort’.  What he didn’t know about me and soon would learn is that when I have a goal – I’m determined to see it through.  So – Wawang Lake Resort is here today because of our efforts and shear determination –  it couldn’t fail.

Now let me tell you a little about our lake and our resort…….

Wawang Lake is a 5,000 acre spring fed lake with  miles of  irregular shoreline,  which offers  the fisherman great fish  habitat to explore, such as sandbars, shoals,  weed beds and  islands and many of these areas are adjacent to deep water making them attractive and popular fishing spots for both walleye and pike & perfect  for exciting  fishing for the fisherman.

Our  lake is  easy to navigate and offers a variety of lake structure that is excellent  for both walleye and northern pike and better yet it’s nearly stress free for mishaps for those that bring their own boats.

IMG_0037

We have seven cabins that have a spectacular view of our magnificent lake.  You  will  be sure  to enjoy the beauty  of our 1,500′ tropical like beach with gradual incline, and, the resort’s shoreline bottom is all sand for an afternoon swim or just relax tanning on the beach.  Our lake also has many other sand beaches that are  perfect for a private swim, or the traditional shore lunch.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Upon your arrival we offer a detailed map of the lake and will highlight areas showing where the successful fishing has been prior to your arrival.   Our main objective for the angler is to catch fish.  Our main objective for the hunter is to be successful.

Wawang NEW Map

Wawang Lake is well-known for its trophy sized walleye and northern and over the years has brought many great memories of the action and the numbers of these large fish have offered.  For instance, the largest walleye  caught & released was 37”  15 1/2 lb, and, the largest northern also caught & released was 52.5”  38 1/2 lb.  Guests have stated that they have caught and released many trophy fish during their stay in fact our records show that one guest caught over 40 trophy fish in three visits to Wawang Lake.  Nice!

20 x 24 (4)    48.5    26.25

 If you follow this blog you’ll find that the fishing is utterly spectacular.  So why pay for the expense of fly-out services, or, the longer trip of boat-in services when you can simply drive up to Wawang Lake Resort with the comfort of knowing that your vehicle is just outside your cabin door.

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About Wawang Lake

About

cabinsc1c4 [640x480]
No Other Resorts, Homes or Cottages on our lake – just us & YOU!  As a matter of fact our nearest neighbors are 28 miles south of us.  Our post office is further yet at 50 miles south of us.  So if you’re getting the impression we are secluded – you would be right.

Terry came to this magnificent area in 1969 and I soon followed a few years later.  One day he said to me, “We should build a resort’.  What he didn’t know about me and soon would learn is that when I have a goal – I’m determined to see it through.  So – Wawang Lake Resort is here today because of our efforts and shear determination –  it couldn’t fail.

Now let me tell you a little about our lake and our resort…….

Wawang Lake is a 5,000 acre spring fed lake with  miles of  irregular shoreline,  which offers  the fisherman great fish  habitat to explore, such as sandbars, shoals,  weed beds and  islands and many of these areas are adjacent to deep water making them attractive and popular fishing spots for both walleye and pike & perfect  for exciting  fishing for the fisherman.

Our  lake is  easy to navigate and offers a variety of lake structure that is excellent  for both walleye and northern pike and better yet it’s nearly stress free for mishaps for those that bring their own boats.

IMG_0037

We have seven cabins that have a spectacular view of our magnificent lake.  You  will  be sure  to enjoy the beauty  of our 1,500′ tropical like beach with gradual incline, and, the resort’s shoreline bottom is all sand for an afternoon swim or just relax tanning on the beach.  Our lake also has many other sand beaches that are  perfect for a private swim, or the traditional shore lunch.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Upon your arrival we offer a detailed map of the lake and will highlight areas showing where the successful fishing has been prior to your arrival.   Our main objective for the angler is to catch fish.  Our main objective for the hunter is to be successful.

Wawang Lake is well-known for its trophy sized walleye and northern and over the years has brought many great memories of the action and the numbers of these large fish have offered.  For instance, the largest walleye  caught & released was 37”  15 1/2 lb, and, the largest northern also caught & released was 52.5”  38 1/2 lb.  Guests have stated that they have caught and released many trophy fish during their stay in fact our records show that one guest caught over 40 trophy fish in three visits to Wawang Lake.  Nice!

20 x 24 (4)    48.5    26.25

 If you follow this blog you’ll find that the fishing is utterly spectacular.  So why pay for the expense of fly-out services, or, the longer trip of boat-in services when you can simply drive up to Wawang Lake Resort with the comfort of knowing that your vehicle is just outside your cabin door.
Wawang NEW Map

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Driving on Gravel/Logging Roads

“The Graham Road up to Wawang Lake is made up of a finer gravel and the speed limit is 70 km/h, although remember that speed is for ideal conditions only. If it’s rainy or snowing or you just don’t feel comfortable, slow down.”

WP_20130607_002
Visibility can be an issue due to the dust clouds kicked up by yours and other vehicles although mornings, high humidity and rain will reduce dust dramatically.  The majority of the Graham Road up to our lodge has a dust control chemical put down which keeps the dust to a minimum.  Without that control, the dust can be as thick as fog. It can be difficult to drive through therefore it’s advisable to slow down and drive over to the right as far as the road will allow safely, without mishap.   Sometimes you need to put on your four-ways just so the other vehicles can see you coming.

u3ntitledFlying stones are another hazard to be aware of, especially if you don’t want to lose a headlight, or windshield. If there is a vehicle travelling in front of you, allow plenty of space between the vehicles. Because it takes longer to stop on gravel roads, and dust can impede your visibility, road safety experts suggest a minimum of six seconds of following distance instead of the three seconds usually recommended on paved roads.

The Graham Road is wide and built to government standards allowing for two-way traffic of large profile vehicles.  The road also has a shoulder but keep in mind that larger rocks, logs and other debris are pushed over to the edge and could pose a danger to tires if driven over.

The most important thing to keep in mind on gravel is: slow down. To avoid skidding, when accelerating or turning a corner, do so gently, and brake gradually when slowing down or stopping.  But what if you do begin to feel like you’re losing control?

imagesCAAOLYAP

Diagram for single vehicle

It comes back to remaining calm. You want to have both hands on the wheel so you are in control of the vehicle. It’s normal for the vehicle to feel like it’s wandering slightly on gravel, but just don’t fight your vehicle – try not to over steer. If your vehicle does begin to skid, don’t hit the brakes. Take your foot off the accelerator and stay calm.

For a more comfortable ride it’s advisable to reduce the air in your tires.  Another important reason why to do this is to avoid flat tires.  Low pressure (softer tires) will roll over rocks and other small logging road debris easier without the mishap of a flat tire.  Normal paved road tire pressure isn’t as fogivable.

Remember, on the Graham Road you’re more likely to see wildlife so be ready for a close encounter along with an approaching vehicle or logging truck.  You’ll want to keep your camera ready because the wildlife our area itself has to offer can make your entire trip to the lodge a great memory.

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Choosing the Right Fishing Lodge

For anglers of any age, nothing beats the thrill of experiencing the wonder and adventure of staying at a fishing lodge or fishing camp.

Whether you are hoping to find easy-to-catch fish, or just some rest and relaxation, there is a lodge or camp available that is right for you. But how do you choose the perfect lodge, and what are the criteria to follow when making that all-important booking decision? Follow these tips and be prepared to experience your own wilderness utopia.

Defining Your Needs
When picking a lodge or fishing camp for the first time, you must decide what you want to experience and enjoy during your stay. If fishing is the sole reason for taking the trip, then your search can be immediately narrowed down. However, if your family is taking part in the excursion, you have to make sure that the establishment has activities that cater to the entire family.

Planning is the key to a successful fishing lodge vacation.
Making a list of what you intend to do while you are there will make the job of finding a lodge even easier. Once your list is full of your needs and wants, then it is time to contact a random selection of lodges to find out if they can satisfy all of these particulars.

To Stay or Go?
One of the big thrills of getting away to a fishing lodge is precisely that — getting away. But important decisions must be made on how far away from home you can afford to go.

  • Fly-in lodges are always more expensive than drive-to for obvious reasons.
  • Fly-in’s do offer the remoteness, solitude that many of us crave, although it does come at a price. However, some remote drive to’s & boat in’s offer similar options as fly-out services without the expensive cost.
  • If you are looking for that “once-in-a-lifetime” experience similar to a fly-out then a remote drive to or boat in would definitely be the way to go.
  • A remote drive to or boat in lodges are destination that you could make an annual event since it’s less costly.

Time Of Year
Depending on the time of year or season, rates for lodges can vary drastically. Peak summer months will always be the most expensive, while spring and fall trips will generally offer considerable savings. Fishing can often be best during these off-peak times, and the weather can frequently be more comfortable and refreshing.

Early spring walleye fishing is an example of fishing being better during off-peak periods, as is fall monster northern pike fishing. Investigate the species you are after and the weather history for the area you intend to travel to, and reap the rewards of lower rates during the “other” seasons offered.

Add-On Prices
There are numerous ways to save money while heading to a lodge, and I have taken advantage of some of them for added discounts in the end. If you own a boat, and the lodge is within driving distance, savings can be incurred by simply taking your own boat instead of renting one during your stay.

Another tip is to take your own food if you are staying in a self-sufficient HOUSEKEEPING accommodation, instead of paying the extra cost of having your meals prepared for you.

Although many anglers enjoy these “luxuries,” of the AMERICAN PLAN PACKAGES and find that these perks are one of the reasons for going, my aim is to point out that those that think they can’t afford a trip away can readily do so if they pass on some of the fancy trimmings.

Ask Many Questions
My best advice for choosing the lodge that is right for you is to do some thorough investigating and to ask many questions. Lodge owners are more than happy to answer any of the concerns or queries you may have. Here are some questions to get you started:

  1. How long have you been in the business?
  2. What activities do you offer, for both the fisherman and family members?
  3. May I bring my own boat?
  4. What are the fish limits, slot restrictions?
  5. What species of fish are found in your lake and what is the success rate of your guests?
  6. Do you offer a cancellation refund in case of an emergency?
  7. What were some of the memorable catches from the previous year?
  8. What’s included in the rate, and what’s not included?
  9. How much is bait and gasoline?
  10. Do you offer ice, freezer space?
  11. What makes your lodge different than most others?
  12. How old are the cabins/units? Do they have electricity, appliances, bathroom facilities?
  13. Are pets allowed?
  14. Can a fishing license/tackle/groceries be purchased on site?

Ask a ton of questions before you book a fishing vacation … it will eliminate any unwanted surprises! And the memory of your trip will last a lifetime.

By asking these types of questions, you will get a better feel for the lodge itself and what it can offer you in terms of a get-away.

Experience the thrill that fishing lodges or camps offer by finding one that suits your needs. By putting in a bit of homework and pre-planning your trip, there will be no surprises.

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Wawang Lake – Great Horned Owl

great-horned-owl-closeup2The great horned owl is one of Ontario’s most common owl species, and the largest (in overall size). Seeing the Great Horned Owl in and around Wawang Lake is very common but you will need to keep a keen eye open for them as they are camoflaged so well into their surroundings that they are hidden to the human eye.

This owl is quite distinct in size and features. It has large yellow eyes, and prominent ear tufts (horns). It has a broad face, curved beak, visible facial disk (darker feathers around face) and large talons. The great horned owl is a brown-grey, with distinct barred underparts and their markings help them camouflage (blend) in trees. Females, as with all raptor species, are significantly larger than males. This is a nocturnal owl, meaning it is most active at night. This owl makes a booming call, whoo-hoo-ho-o-o. Also, this bird DOES NOT migrate.

Habitat:
Great horned owls are found in a variety of habitats. They prefer to live in open woodlands, with secondary-growth forests or around agricultural areas. They are commonly found in boreal forests, or mixed forests with both deciduous (leafy) and coniferous (needle) trees.

31 Great Horned Owl_artusoBreeding:
The great horned owl does not make their own nests; instead they find nests from other animals to use. Nests are usually only used for a single mating season because they are easily destroyed by all the hatchling activity. These owls will take nests from red-tailed hawks, crows, and even squirrels. This owl may also nest in tree cavities, or rock ledges.

This species is territorial, and on average there will be one pair per 7-10 km2. Great horned owls will pair with a single mate for their life, unless that mate is killed, and will return to the same territory for a number of years. This owl will not breed until their second year, although occasionally younger birds breed if food is abundant.

Great horned owls breed during the winter months (January-February). The eggs are incubated by the female for one month. Females will lay 1-5 eggs with food availability being the biggest factor that affects the number of eggs deposited. Hatchlings appear mid-April to early May, and the mother will brood (sit on young and keep safe and warm) the hatchlings continuously for 2 weeks, with the male being responsible for bringing food to the mother and hatchlings. Owlettes (baby owls) are covered in down feathers (fluffy) and will not be able to leave the nest until 2 months of age. The young will remain within their parent’s territory until the fall.

Time before fledging, the period of first flight, is critical for the owlettes to learn how to hunt, fly, and be an owl (if owlettes are raised by humans during this time, they will be human-imprinted, meaning they will think they are a human as they aren’t born knowing they are owls…they imprint on the first thing they see-which would be their own parents). Death rates are high, with 50% of young that leave the nest dieing during their first year.

imagesCAB3LUNEDiet:
Great horned owls are a top predator and are strictly carnivorous. They eat different sized prey, ranging from the size of a mouse to as large as a goose. One of the great horned owls favourite meals is skunk, and they are the only natural predator to skunks-they don’t have a sense of smell, so skunks have no defenses against this owl. Small prey, such as mice, are swallowed whole, while larger prey are dismembered before eaten. Owls eat ALL their prey; however, not all is digestible. Fur, feathers, teeth and bones are not digested and are compacted into a pellet which the owl will regurgitate before their next meal.

Threats to species:
The biggest threat to the great horned owl is humans. They are commonly hit by cars, due to their nocturnal hunting, collide with buildings, fly into power lines, and are shot by farmers.

Threat to humans:
This owl is really no threat to humans. They will aggressively protect their nests, so don’t bother them during nesting season, but otherwise, if you see one count yourself lucky.

Fun facts:

  • The great horned owl will hang large prey in trees and will eat it for a number of days.
  • Crows regularly harass great horned owls, so if you see a tree with a ton of crows flying into it, there is most likely a great horned owl there.
  • Great horned owls will eat porcupines, and commonly have porcupine quills stuck to their body.

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