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Tag Archives: Fishing sinker

FISHING WEIGHTS (Sinkers)

walleyeFishing weights (sinkers) are made from two basic materials lead and steel. The two types of sinkers are: attached on the line by pinching, twisted on using rubber insert or tied directly to your line (Bottom Bouncers / Bead Chain Sinkers). The other is sliding: which allows the fishing line to slide or pass through the weight from a hole or an eyelet. The same principle applies in using sinkers for your set-up use the lightest possible sinker in order to detect fish strikes.

Popular Common Sinkers / Weights Types:

split shotSplit Shot
Pinches easily onto your line where you want to set depth at. Removes just as easy by pinching the other end. Used for live bait and lures.

split shot rig

SPLIT SHOT RIG

Split Shot Rig
This is about as basic as you can get on a rig. The nice thing is, you don’t have to re-tie any knots to change the sinker position on the line; just pinch it on and off.

split shot stream

SPLIT SHOT STREAM

Stream Rig

The stream rig also known as a drift rig are used commonly by walleye anglers in certain situations, such as in light current or when drift fishing in relatively shallow water.

rubber coreRubber Core
Attach to line through the slot in the sinker and twisting the inner rubber core around line to secure it. Used when heavier weight is required.

DROP SHOT

Drop Shot
Many tackle companies manufacture designed drop shot weights, round or rectangular of lead or tungsten and come with a tie on clip on the top. The weights range from 1/8 oz. to 1/2 oz.

dead shot rig

Drop Shot Rig
The drop-shot rig is a finesse technique that has been made popular by the walleye fishing anglers as well are now using the drop shot with many successes.

bottom bouncer rig

Bottom Bouncer
The bottom bouncer is an effective rigging tool while trolling or drifting presenting the lure/bait rig above snag laced bottom of small rocks, logs, over mud/sand flats, or open basins. A weighted wire feeler arm minimizes hang-ups while riding upright across underwater structure deflecting snags.

Bead Chain

Bead Chain / Trolling
Great for trolling lighter lures without having to use lead core line or down-riggers.

Bank

Bank
Similar to the walking sinker but comes in heavier weights 1 oz. – 6 oz.  Squared edge design helps you keep your bait where you want it.

Bullet

Bullet
As the name implies it is shaped like a Bullet used on Texas rigs in front of the worm, lizards or on Carolina rigs, with it’s pointed nose it slides easily through the weeds or wood without getting snagged. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz to 1 oz.

carolina rig

Carolina Rig
The Carolina rig is a popular and effective way to rig for bass. Just about any soft plastic can be used when Carolina rigging.

casting

Casting
All around general sinker used on many rigs, the top loop makes it easy to tie on or let the weight slide up and down the line. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

 

Three Way Rig

Three Way Rig
The three-way rig receives its name from the main swivel used on the rig. It is also recognized as the wolf river rig.

disc

Disc
Used in fast water currents lays flat on the bottom where snags are a problem. Weight Sizes 1/2 oz. to 4 oz.

egg

Egg
The egg sinker is used on multiple rigs, as a sliding sinker or pegged to function as a stationary weight. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

flat
Flat

Also known as a No Roll this flat sliding sinker planes right to the bottom and hold for use in heavy current. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

pyramid

Pyramid
Great sinker for fishing swift rivers and heavy surf that have a soft bottom (mud and sand) the corners dig in keeping the weight stationary. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

 walkingWalking
A very popular walleye angler sinker. A rectangular sinker with rounded outside edges a top eye for the line with the bottom slightly wider and larger in size than top, holding more weight. The bottom is also rounded and bent upwards. This allows the sinker to “walk” on the bottom over rocks and rubble reducing the chance of snagging. The semi-flat design also prevents it from rolling in faster currents.  Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 1/2 oz.

slide rig

Sliding Sinker Bottom Rig
The sliding sinker bottom rig is the most popular and versatile rig for live bait fishing. Depending on where you are from and the species of fish you’re targeting this rig it has many names the most common is the trade name Lindy Rig.

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TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Tags: , , , , , , ,

Fall Rigs for Late Walleye Fishing

From late summer though fall, live-bait fishing catches walleye every day in Wawang Lake. Other methods may catch more, but don’t count on it.   Especially when that weight sliding on your main line is perfectly in tune with depth, wind, bait type and size.

A leader separates a struggling live bait from that weight, giving it room to swim, squirm and attract fish. Simple. Beautiful. Deadly. But the key is putting that living minnow, leech or crawler on a target below the boat. Like a bombardier, rigging experts know how to triangulate their targets and allow for current, velocity and depth.  But being a rigging bombardier doesn’t require magic or genius. Triangulating, in this case, is simple. As you move deeper, use a larger weight. As the wind picks up, go with a larger weight. And as the size of the bait increases – well, you get the idea.

There is no doubt that it’s a proven system, and the most efficient live-bait delivery system possible.  Success is really about location, followed by time of year and bait selection. Carefully considering these ups your odds. The key to success with rigging is placing live bait precisely on a small target below the boat, and to do that it’s better to use a weight that is too heavy than one that’s too light.

  • What are bass anglers good at – Accurate pitching to visible targets.

  • What are walleye anglers good at – Putting a sinker in a 12-inch circle 25-feet down.

  • That’s why sinker size and type is critical.

Leaders testing 4- to 8-pounds and 4 feet long (from swivel to hook) are optimum most of the time. Some anglers primarily rigs with two types of sinkers from late summer on: Lindy Walking Sinkers – the most popular rigging weights ever – and Lindy Rattlin’ No-Snagg Sinkers.

Lindy rigs really shine on main-lake points and humps from late summer through fall.  They maintain bottom contact to cover those critical transitions from hard to soft bottom that attract baitfish. Transitions are classic rigging zones.  Transitions show up on sonar – the hard bottom showing bright and dense while soft substrates return a weaker signal.

Use a sensitive, medium-light, 7-foot rod with braided line on the reel.  Braid doesn’t stretch, so it transmits vibration and feel much better.  You can tell when your bait is almost to that point where the bottom changes, helping you visualize exactly where it is.

During late summer, walleyes move out on main-lake points and humps to depths of 20 to 25 feet. By late autumn, it’s common to find them 35 to 55 feet down.  Follow them down through fall with heavier sinkers.  If it’s windy, go even heavier. Again, it’s better to go too heavy than too light. If you can’t feel bottom, go up a notch in weight.

vertical

Weekend anglers often forget that rigging isn’t just dragging baits around on bottom.   Criss-cross transitions, moving from shallow to deep and back again.

When marking walleye on the edge of a break at 25 feet, snake from 27 to 23 and back down.  When the bait’s moving away from them, going shallower or deeper, they react as if it’s trying to get away.   vertical-jigging-1Also lift the rig off bottom as it approaches a marked fish.  Using the Rattlin’ No Snagg Sinker, shake it. Raising it off bottom can trigger a reluctant fish. It’s that escape trigger – making walleye think the baitfish is moving away.

Which brings up another important point, after every bite, try to remember exactly what you were doing before it happened – what direction you were going, how fast you were moving, how high or fast you lifted the bait. All those factors become pattern identification. That’s how you go on to catch four, five or a dozen more. And once you catch a few fish off a point or hump, try to find the same kind of spots. That’s how you create patterns with Lindy rigs in the fall.

When a fish bites, feed it line for at least 10 seconds while slowly maneuvering the boat toward the fish.   Sometimes wait up to a minute.  If they really whack it, it’s 10 seconds.  If they barely pick it up, let them take it longer and point the rod right at the fish and move the boat over it, slowly picking up slack. When you feel tension, set. If you miss,  let them take it longer next time.

The sinker selection is the key element that many anglers overlook for late-summer, early fall walleye rigging.

It’s all about striking a balance between wind, depth, and bait size. You want to stay relatively vertical in deep water. Mostly use 1/2- to 1-ounce weights late summer through fall because walleyes are 25 to 45 feet down. And use bigger minnows in fall, lip hooked on size 4 to size 1 octopus-style hooks. You want to be right below the boat when you’re on fish, but you have to keep moving to find them, so you have to strike a balance that way, too. Once you start marking fish, zero in on that depth.

IMG_4006

Sometimes it helps to pulse your trolling motor and change direction and speed.

That’s what triggers strikes when Lindy rigging – slight variations in speed and direction. And if using that Rattlin’ No Snagg sinker, lift, drop and shake it a lot to activate those rattles. That triggers strikes, too. But choose the shape and type of sinker based on bottom type, cover and conditions to be efficient.

  • The classic Lindy Walking Sinker is perfect for sand, gravel and subtle transitions in clear water.
  • The No Snagg shines around broken rock, wood and boulders, and the Rattlin’ No Snagg is right whenever the water is cloudy.

Another bonus is that No Snagg wobbles a little bit, which moves the bait. It twitches a leech, crawler, or minnow just a little bit. That’s all it can take to trigger a walleye.

But don’t forget to zig-zag. And pause when you mark a fish. Lift the bait, too. And shake it. Just dragging bait around won’t cut it most days.

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WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Tags: , , , , , , ,

FISHING WEIGHTS (Sinkers)

walleyeFishing weights (sinkers) are made from two basic materials lead and steel. The two types of sinkers are: attached on the line by pinching, twisted on using rubber insert or tied directly to your line (Bottom Bouncers / Bead Chain Sinkers). The other is sliding: which allows the fishing line to slide or pass through the weight from a hole or an eyelet. The same principle applies in using sinkers for your set-up use the lightest possible sinker in order to detect fish strikes.

Popular Common Sinkers / Weights Types:

split shotSplit Shot
Pinches easily onto your line where you want to set depth at. Removes just as easy by pinching the other end. Used for live bait and lures.

split shot rig

SPLIT SHOT RIG

Split Shot Rig
This is about as basic as you can get on a rig. The nice thing is, you don’t have to re-tie any knots to change the sinker position on the line; just pinch it on and off.

split shot stream

SPLIT SHOT STREAM

Stream Rig

The stream rig also known as a drift rig are used commonly by walleye anglers in certain situations, such as in light current or when drift fishing in relatively shallow water.

rubber coreRubber Core
Attach to line through the slot in the sinker and twisting the inner rubber core around line to secure it. Used when heavier weight is required.

DROP SHOT

Drop Shot
Many tackle companies manufacture designed drop shot weights, round or rectangular of lead or tungsten and come with a tie on clip on the top. The weights range from 1/8 oz. to 1/2 oz.

dead shot rig

Drop Shot Rig
The drop-shot rig is a finesse technique that has been made popular by the walleye fishing anglers as well are now using the drop shot with many successes.

bottom bouncer rig

Bottom Bouncer
The bottom bouncer is an effective rigging tool while trolling or drifting presenting the lure/bait rig above snag laced bottom of small rocks, logs, over mud/sand flats, or open basins. A weighted wire feeler arm minimizes hang-ups while riding upright across underwater structure deflecting snags.

Bead Chain

Bead Chain / Trolling
Great for trolling lighter lures without having to use lead core line or down-riggers.

Bank

Bank
Similar to the walking sinker but comes in heavier weights 1 oz. – 6 oz.  Squared edge design helps you keep your bait where you want it.

Bullet

Bullet
As the name implies it is shaped like a Bullet used on Texas rigs in front of the worm, lizards or on Carolina rigs, with it’s pointed nose it slides easily through the weeds or wood without getting snagged. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz to 1 oz.

carolina rig

Carolina Rig
The Carolina rig is a popular and effective way to rig for bass. Just about any soft plastic can be used when Carolina rigging.

casting

Casting
All around general sinker used on many rigs, the top loop makes it easy to tie on or let the weight slide up and down the line. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

 

Three Way Rig

Three Way Rig
The three-way rig receives its name from the main swivel used on the rig. It is also recognized as the wolf river rig.

disc

Disc
Used in fast water currents lays flat on the bottom where snags are a problem. Weight Sizes 1/2 oz. to 4 oz.

egg

Egg
The egg sinker is used on multiple rigs, as a sliding sinker or pegged to function as a stationary weight. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

flat
Flat

Also known as a No Roll this flat sliding sinker planes right to the bottom and hold for use in heavy current. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

pyramid

Pyramid
Great sinker for fishing swift rivers and heavy surf that have a soft bottom (mud and sand) the corners dig in keeping the weight stationary. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

 walkingWalking
A very popular walleye angler sinker. A rectangular sinker with rounded outside edges a top eye for the line with the bottom slightly wider and larger in size than top, holding more weight. The bottom is also rounded and bent upwards. This allows the sinker to “walk” on the bottom over rocks and rubble reducing the chance of snagging. The semi-flat design also prevents it from rolling in faster currents.  Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 1/2 oz.

slide rig

Sliding Sinker Bottom Rig
The sliding sinker bottom rig is the most popular and versatile rig for live bait fishing. Depending on where you are from and the species of fish you’re targeting this rig it has many names the most common is the trade name Lindy Rig.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

FISHING WEIGHTS (Sinkers)

IMG_2196Fishing weights (sinkers) are made from two basic materials lead and steel. The two types of sinkers are: attached on the line by pinching, twisted on using rubber insert or tied directly to your line (Bottom Bouncers / Bead Chain Sinkers). The other is sliding: which allows the fishing line to slide or pass through the weight from a hole or an eyelet. The same principle applies in using sinkers for your set-up use the lightest possible sinker in order to detect fish strikes.

Popular Common Sinkers / Weights Types:

split shotSplit Shot
Pinches easily onto your line where you want to set depth at. Removes just as easy by pinching the other end. Used for live bait and lures.

split shot rig

SPLIT SHOT RIG

Split Shot Rig
This is about as basic as you can get on a rig. The nice thing is, you don’t have to re-tie any knots to change the sinker position on the line; just pinch it on and off.

split shot stream

SPLIT SHOT STREAM

Stream Rig

The stream rig also known as a drift rig are used commonly by walleye anglers in certain situations, such as in light current or when drift fishing in relatively shallow water.

rubber coreRubber Core
Attach to line through the slot in the sinker and twisting the inner rubber core around line to secure it. Used when heavier weight is required.

DROP SHOT

Drop Shot
Many tackle companies manufacture designed drop shot weights, round or rectangular of lead or tungsten and come with a tie on clip on the top. The weights range from 1/8 oz. to 1/2 oz.

dead shot rig

Drop Shot Rig
The drop-shot rig is a finesse technique that has been made popular by the walleye fishing anglers as well are now using the drop shot with many successes.

bottom bouncer rig

Bottom Bouncer
The bottom bouncer is an effective rigging tool while trolling or drifting presenting the lure/bait rig above snag laced bottom of small rocks, logs, over mud/sand flats, or open basins. A weighted wire feeler arm minimizes hang-ups while riding upright across underwater structure deflecting snags.

Bead Chain

Bead Chain / Trolling
Great for trolling lighter lures without having to use lead core line or down-riggers.

Bank

Bank
Similar to the walking sinker but comes in heavier weights 1 oz. – 6 oz.  Squared edge design helps you keep your bait where you want it.

Bullet

Bullet
As the name implies it is shaped like a Bullet used on Texas rigs in front of the worm, lizards or on Carolina rigs, with it’s pointed nose it slides easily through the weeds or wood without getting snagged. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz to 1 oz.

carolina rig

Carolina Rig
The Carolina rig is a popular and effective way to rig for bass. Just about any soft plastic can be used when Carolina rigging.

casting

Casting
All around general sinker used on many rigs, the top loop makes it easy to tie on or let the weight slide up and down the line. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

 

Three Way Rig

Three Way Rig
The three-way rig receives its name from the main swivel used on the rig. It is also recognized as the wolf river rig.

disc

Disc
Used in fast water currents lays flat on the bottom where snags are a problem. Weight Sizes 1/2 oz. to 4 oz.

egg

Egg
The egg sinker is used on multiple rigs, as a sliding sinker or pegged to function as a stationary weight. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

flat
Flat

Also known as a No Roll this flat sliding sinker planes right to the bottom and hold for use in heavy current. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

pyramid

Pyramid
Great sinker for fishing swift rivers and heavy surf that have a soft bottom (mud and sand) the corners dig in keeping the weight stationary. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

 walkingWalking
A very popular walleye angler sinker. A rectangular sinker with rounded outside edges a top eye for the line with the bottom slightly wider and larger in size than top, holding more weight. The bottom is also rounded and bent upwards. This allows the sinker to “walk” on the bottom over rocks and rubble reducing the chance of snagging. The semi-flat design also prevents it from rolling in faster currents.  Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 1/2 oz.

slide rig

Sliding Sinker Bottom Rig
The sliding sinker bottom rig is the most popular and versatile rig for live bait fishing. Depending on where you are from and the species of fish you’re targeting this rig it has many names the most common is the trade name Lindy Rig.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Fall Rigs for Late Walleye Fishing

From late summer though fall, live-bait fishing catches walleye every day in Wawang Lake. Other methods may catch more, but don’t count on it.   Especially when that weight sliding on your main line is perfectly in tune with depth, wind, bait type and size.

A leader separates a struggling live bait from that weight, giving it room to swim, squirm and attract fish. Simple. Beautiful. Deadly. But the key is putting that living minnow, leech or crawler on a target below the boat. Like a bombardier, rigging experts know how to triangulate their targets and allow for current, velocity and depth.  But being a rigging bombardier doesn’t require magic or genius. Triangulating, in this case, is simple. As you move deeper, use a larger weight. As the wind picks up, go with a larger weight. And as the size of the bait increases – well, you get the idea.

There is no doubt that it’s a proven system, and the most efficient live-bait delivery system possible.  Success is really about location, followed by time of year and bait selection. Carefully considering these ups your odds. The key to success with rigging is placing live bait precisely on a small target below the boat, and to do that it’s better to use a weight that is too heavy than one that’s too light.

  • What are bass anglers good at – Accurate pitching to visible targets.

  • What are walleye anglers good at – Putting a sinker in a 12-inch circle 25-feet down.

  • That’s why sinker size and type is critical.

Leaders testing 4- to 8-pounds and 4 feet long (from swivel to hook) are optimum most of the time. Some anglers primarily rigs with two types of sinkers from late summer on: Lindy Walking Sinkers – the most popular rigging weights ever – and Lindy Rattlin’ No-Snagg Sinkers.

Lindy rigs really shine on main-lake points and humps from late summer through fall.  They maintain bottom contact to cover those critical transitions from hard to soft bottom that attract baitfish. Transitions are classic rigging zones.  Transitions show up on sonar – the hard bottom showing bright and dense while soft substrates return a weaker signal.

Use a sensitive, medium-light, 7-foot rod with braided line on the reel.  Braid doesn’t stretch, so it transmits vibration and feel much better.  You can tell when your bait is almost to that point where the bottom changes, helping you visualize exactly where it is.

During late summer, walleyes move out on main-lake points and humps to depths of 20 to 25 feet. By late autumn, it’s common to find them 35 to 55 feet down.  Follow them down through fall with heavier sinkers.  If it’s windy, go even heavier. Again, it’s better to go too heavy than too light. If you can’t feel bottom, go up a notch in weight.

vertical

Weekend anglers often forget that rigging isn’t just dragging baits around on bottom.   Criss-cross transitions, moving from shallow to deep and back again.

When marking walleye on the edge of a break at 25 feet, snake from 27 to 23 and back down.  When the bait’s moving away from them, going shallower or deeper, they react as if it’s trying to get away.   vertical-jigging-1Also lift the rig off bottom as it approaches a marked fish.  Using the Rattlin’ No Snagg Sinker, shake it. Raising it off bottom can trigger a reluctant fish. It’s that escape trigger – making walleye think the baitfish is moving away.

Which brings up another important point, after every bite, try to remember exactly what you were doing before it happened – what direction you were going, how fast you were moving, how high or fast you lifted the bait. All those factors become pattern identification. That’s how you go on to catch four, five or a dozen more. And once you catch a few fish off a point or hump, try to find the same kind of spots. That’s how you create patterns with Lindy rigs in the fall.

When a fish bites, feed it line for at least 10 seconds while slowly maneuvering the boat toward the fish.   Sometimes wait up to a minute.  If they really whack it, it’s 10 seconds.  If they barely pick it up, let them take it longer and point the rod right at the fish and move the boat over it, slowly picking up slack. When you feel tension, set. If you miss,  let them take it longer next time.

The sinker selection is the key element that many anglers overlook for late-summer, early fall walleye rigging.

It’s all about striking a balance between wind, depth, and bait size. You want to stay relatively vertical in deep water. Mostly use 1/2- to 1-ounce weights late summer through fall because walleyes are 25 to 45 feet down. And use bigger minnows in fall, lip hooked on size 4 to size 1 octopus-style hooks. You want to be right below the boat when you’re on fish, but you have to keep moving to find them, so you have to strike a balance that way, too. Once you start marking fish, zero in on that depth.

Sometimes it helps to pulse your trolling motor and change direction and speed.

That’s what triggers strikes when Lindy rigging – slight variations in speed and direction. And if using that Rattlin’ No Snagg sinker, lift, drop and shake it a lot to activate those rattles. That triggers strikes, too. But choose the shape and type of sinker based on bottom type, cover and conditions to be efficient.

  • The classic Lindy Walking Sinker is perfect for sand, gravel and subtle transitions in clear water.
  • The No Snagg shines around broken rock, wood and boulders, and the Rattlin’ No Snagg is right whenever the water is cloudy.

Another bonus is that No Snagg wobbles a little bit, which moves the bait. It twitches a leech, crawler, or minnow just a little bit. That’s all it can take to trigger a walleye.

But don’t forget to zig-zag. And pause when you mark a fish. Lift the bait, too. And shake it. Just dragging bait around won’t cut it most days.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

FISHING WEIGHTS (Sinkers)

walleyeFishing weights (sinkers) are made from two basic materials lead and steel. The two types of sinkers are: attached on the line by pinching, twisted on using rubber insert or tied directly to your line (Bottom Bouncers / Bead Chain Sinkers). The other is sliding: which allows the fishing line to slide or pass through the weight from a hole or an eyelet. The same principle applies in using sinkers for your set-up use the lightest possible sinker in order to detect fish strikes.

Popular Common Sinkers / Weights Types:

split shotSplit Shot
Pinches easily onto your line where you want to set depth at. Removes just as easy by pinching the other end. Used for live bait and lures.

split shot rig

SPLIT SHOT RIG

Split Shot Rig
This is about as basic as you can get on a rig. The nice thing is, you don’t have to re-tie any knots to change the sinker position on the line; just pinch it on and off.

split shot stream

SPLIT SHOT STREAM

Stream Rig

The stream rig also known as a drift rig are used commonly by walleye anglers in certain situations, such as in light current or when drift fishing in relatively shallow water.

rubber coreRubber Core
Attach to line through the slot in the sinker and twisting the inner rubber core around line to secure it. Used when heavier weight is required.

DROP SHOT

Drop Shot
Many tackle companies manufacture designed drop shot weights, round or rectangular of lead or tungsten and come with a tie on clip on the top. The weights range from 1/8 oz. to 1/2 oz.

dead shot rig

Drop Shot Rig
The drop-shot rig is a finesse technique that has been made popular by the walleye fishing anglers as well are now using the drop shot with many successes.

bottom bouncer rig

Bottom Bouncer
The bottom bouncer is an effective rigging tool while trolling or drifting presenting the lure/bait rig above snag laced bottom of small rocks, logs, over mud/sand flats, or open basins. A weighted wire feeler arm minimizes hang-ups while riding upright across underwater structure deflecting snags.

Bead Chain

Bead Chain / Trolling
Great for trolling lighter lures without having to use lead core line or down-riggers.

Bank

Bank
Similar to the walking sinker but comes in heavier weights 1 oz. – 6 oz.  Squared edge design helps you keep your bait where you want it.

Bullet

Bullet
As the name implies it is shaped like a Bullet used on Texas rigs in front of the worm, lizards or on Carolina rigs, with it’s pointed nose it slides easily through the weeds or wood without getting snagged. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz to 1 oz.

carolina rig

Carolina Rig
The Carolina rig is a popular and effective way to rig for bass. Just about any soft plastic can be used when Carolina rigging.

casting

Casting
All around general sinker used on many rigs, the top loop makes it easy to tie on or let the weight slide up and down the line. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

 

Three Way Rig

Three Way Rig
The three-way rig receives its name from the main swivel used on the rig. It is also recognized as the wolf river rig.

disc

Disc
Used in fast water currents lays flat on the bottom where snags are a problem. Weight Sizes 1/2 oz. to 4 oz.

egg

Egg
The egg sinker is used on multiple rigs, as a sliding sinker or pegged to function as a stationary weight. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

flat
Flat

Also known as a No Roll this flat sliding sinker planes right to the bottom and hold for use in heavy current. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

pyramid

Pyramid
Great sinker for fishing swift rivers and heavy surf that have a soft bottom (mud and sand) the corners dig in keeping the weight stationary. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

 walkingWalking
A very popular walleye angler sinker. A rectangular sinker with rounded outside edges a top eye for the line with the bottom slightly wider and larger in size than top, holding more weight. The bottom is also rounded and bent upwards. This allows the sinker to “walk” on the bottom over rocks and rubble reducing the chance of snagging. The semi-flat design also prevents it from rolling in faster currents.  Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 1/2 oz.

slide rig

Sliding Sinker Bottom Rig
The sliding sinker bottom rig is the most popular and versatile rig for live bait fishing. Depending on where you are from and the species of fish you’re targeting this rig it has many names the most common is the trade name Lindy Rig.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

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FISHING WEIGHTS (Sinkers)

walleyeFishing weights (sinkers) are made from two basic materials lead and steel. The two types of sinkers are: attached on the line by pinching, twisted on using rubber insert or tied directly to your line (Bottom Bouncers / Bead Chain Sinkers). The other is sliding: which allows the fishing line to slide or pass through the weight from a hole or an eyelet. The same principle applies in using sinkers for your set-up use the lightest possible sinker in order to detect fish strikes.

Popular Common Sinkers / Weights Types:

split shotSplit Shot
Pinches easily onto your line where you want to set depth at. Removes just as easy by pinching the other end. Used for live bait and lures.

split shot rig

SPLIT SHOT RIG

Split Shot Rig
This is about as basic as you can get on a rig. The nice thing is, you don’t have to re-tie any knots to change the sinker position on the line; just pinch it on and off.

split shot stream

SPLIT SHOT STREAM

Stream Rig

The stream rig also known as a drift rig are used commonly by walleye anglers in certain situations, such as in light current or when drift fishing in relatively shallow water.

rubber coreRubber Core
Attach to line through the slot in the sinker and twisting the inner rubber core around line to secure it. Used when heavier weight is required.

DROP SHOT

Drop Shot
Many tackle companies manufacture designed drop shot weights, round or rectangular of lead or tungsten and come with a tie on clip on the top. The weights range from 1/8 oz. to 1/2 oz.

dead shot rig

Drop Shot Rig
The drop-shot rig is a finesse technique that has been made popular by the walleye fishing anglers as well are now using the drop shot with many successes.

bottom bouncer rig

Bottom Bouncer
The bottom bouncer is an effective rigging tool while trolling or drifting presenting the lure/bait rig above snag laced bottom of small rocks, logs, over mud/sand flats, or open basins. A weighted wire feeler arm minimizes hang-ups while riding upright across underwater structure deflecting snags.

Bead Chain

Bead Chain / Trolling
Great for trolling lighter lures without having to use lead core line or down-riggers.

Bank

Bank
Similar to the walking sinker but comes in heavier weights 1 oz. – 6 oz.  Squared edge design helps you keep your bait where you want it.

Bullet

Bullet
As the name implies it is shaped like a Bullet used on Texas rigs in front of the worm, lizards or on Carolina rigs, with it’s pointed nose it slides easily through the weeds or wood without getting snagged. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz to 1 oz.

carolina rig

Carolina Rig
The Carolina rig is a popular and effective way to rig for bass. Just about any soft plastic can be used when Carolina rigging.

casting

Casting
All around general sinker used on many rigs, the top loop makes it easy to tie on or let the weight slide up and down the line. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

 

Three Way Rig

Three Way Rig
The three-way rig receives its name from the main swivel used on the rig. It is also recognized as the wolf river rig.

disc

Disc
Used in fast water currents lays flat on the bottom where snags are a problem. Weight Sizes 1/2 oz. to 4 oz.

egg

Egg
The egg sinker is used on multiple rigs, as a sliding sinker or pegged to function as a stationary weight. Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 oz.

flat
Flat

Also known as a No Roll this flat sliding sinker planes right to the bottom and hold for use in heavy current. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

pyramid

Pyramid
Great sinker for fishing swift rivers and heavy surf that have a soft bottom (mud and sand) the corners dig in keeping the weight stationary. Weight Sizes 1 oz. to 8 oz.

 walkingWalking
A very popular walleye angler sinker. A rectangular sinker with rounded outside edges a top eye for the line with the bottom slightly wider and larger in size than top, holding more weight. The bottom is also rounded and bent upwards. This allows the sinker to “walk” on the bottom over rocks and rubble reducing the chance of snagging. The semi-flat design also prevents it from rolling in faster currents.  Weight Sizes 1/8 oz. to 1 1/2 oz.

slide rig

Sliding Sinker Bottom Rig
The sliding sinker bottom rig is the most popular and versatile rig for live bait fishing. Depending on where you are from and the species of fish you’re targeting this rig it has many names the most common is the trade name Lindy Rig.

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