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Using Leeches & Worms + VIDEO

 LEECHES AND NIGHTCRAWLERS

DSCN0821Leeches and night-crawlers are favorite foods of the walleye because they are natural offerings in most waters and walleye are accustomed to feeding on them.

When presented properly they are irresistible. A stretched out, wiggling leech bouncing  along just over the bottom of a gravel bar or weed bed, will make even the most finicky walleye take a second look, turn around and zero in on target,   mouth open and taste buds tingling.

Hook the sucker end of the leech to the first hook of a spinner rig and place the tail section on the last hook. Place it in the water and pull it at the same speed you are   going to troll or retrieve at and look for the size, movement and or roll of the leech. It should run straight not roll up into a nondescript little ball; this does not attract walleye. When you have the leech trailing the way you want it’s time to add a few light split shots to get it down to the desired depth. By placing the split shot about eighteen inches to two feet in front of the hook you should be within six inches of bottom with the leech as you troll or retrieve, and you won’t have to run a whole lot of line out behind the boat.

Night-crawlers are attached to your spinner rigs in the same way. Again, make sure they are stretched out along the rig so they trail out on the retrieve. Choose the   largest and fattest worms available.

COLOUR

The spinner rig can be purchased at a local tackle shop and comes in many variations of size and  colors.

A simple rule to remember when faced with color choices is: bright days + clear water = silver spinner is a very good choice.  Darker water or cloudy days try a fluorescent or gold spinner are other good choices

The beads most often used are red with white, or yellow; try mixing the colors until you come up with the pattern that works best for you.

SPEED.

Try slow trolling or retrieving the leech at a fairly fast pace at first to take advantage of more aggressive fish.   Remember that you should troll according the weather system.

Meaning:
Bright, clear day:  troll slow or even jig
Cloudy, rainy day:  Troll faster and a willow leaf blade is a very good choice

A rate of about half again the normal trolling speed usually works well.  Keep track of where the fish are hitting and come back over these same spots again but a little slower this time to take   advantage of the less aggressive fish. Remember that it is not always the larger fish that are most aggressive and by fishing back you can add considerably to your stringer.

CASTING

Having reached the place you are going to fish, maybe a shoal or weed bed that you have had some luck on before, try fan casting. Start at a right angle to where you are standing facing the water. Throw the first cast to the right and keep working  to the left until you have gone in a complete arch to the other end. This will allow you to cover every bit of the water facing you. Now move down until you are at the edge of the spot you covered last and start the same procedure over again. When you have worked your way to the end of the area that you wanted to fish, you will have covered the area correctly.

Inlets are a good place to practice this pattern of casting, especially early season as the walleye are quite often in this area looking for small, early baitfish or crustaceans. By fan casting you can cover this entire area of water.

The above methods have consistently proven to be successful for opening season walleye.   So get your live bait and be ready for a fun day on the lake.

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How to Build a Worm Farm

A worm farm is used as a means of naturally creating fertilization for planting and gardening. Worms are good at breaking down waste matter quickly into rich organic compost.

342x316xWorm-Farm_gif_pagespeed_ic_fLRfWeXSZ1
The components for making one are very much basic and can be more likely be found lying around somewhere in your home so making a worm farm is very simple.

Tools required

  • Gloves
  • Boots
  • Shovel

Materials required

  • Worms
  • Waste (Trash such as kitchen waste, vegetable scraps etc.)
  • Container (such as a bin or otherwise)
  • Top soil
  • Water

Instructions

  1. Most persons prefer to buy the worms however other persons source them elsewhere. Wherever you find it most fit to source your worms is up to you. A pound of worms usually equates to 1,000 worms.
  2. Prepare all your garbage and waste matters and dig a hole with your shovel to put the container in allowing the opening to stay at the top. Make sure the container has some holes as drainage.
  3. When everything is lined up and ready place all the dirt and waste into your worm farm container and use water to saturate the contents then put in all the worms. Close the lid tightly to keep other things out of it.
  4. Wait a couple weeks for the waste to decompose then check the bin for the changes in the compost.
  5. Now you can use the compost from the worm farm as you like for planting and gardening.

Tips and Warning

  • Red worms are most commonly used for worm farms because they consume a lot and optimize the waste matter so they are normally seen as a good investment. Another good option of worms are tiger worms.
  • An old fridge or freezer (that can be closed) can be used as your container for your worm farm; however the main components such as the coils and compressor should be removed before using it. These parts contain chemicals that can escape and poison the earth.
  • The contents of a worm farm can also be used as fish bait when fishing.
  • Do not allow the dirt in the worm farm to get too dry, this will cause the worms to move downwards and slow down the decomposition process.
  • Worm farms help persons to save money, instead of purchasing fertilizers which can be expensive and non-organic that may be harmful to the environment they can make and use cheap organic waste.
  • Because you will be handling all types of dirt and waste matter, it is advised that once you are building a worm farm you always have on the right clothing such as gloves and right shoes this protects you from bacteria and infection.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Using Leeches & Worms + VIDEO

 LEECHES AND NIGHTCRAWLERS

IMG_2141Leeches and night-crawlers are favorite foods of the walleye because they are natural offerings in most waters and walleye are accustomed to feeding on them.

When presented properly they are irresistible. A stretched out, wiggling leech bouncing  along just over the bottom of a gravel bar or weed bed, will make even the most finicky walleye take a second look, turn around and zero in on target,   mouth open and taste buds tingling.

Hook the sucker end of the leech to the first hook of a spinner rig and place the tail section on the last hook. Place it in the water and pull it at the same speed you are   going to troll or retrieve at and look for the size, movement and or roll of the leech. It should run straight not roll up into a nondescript little ball; this does not attract walleye. When you have the leech trailing the way you want it’s time to add a few light split shots to get it down to the desired depth. By placing the split shot about eighteen inches to two feet in front of the hook you should be within six inches of bottom with the leech as you troll or retrieve, and you won’t have to run a whole lot of line out behind the boat.

Night-crawlers are attached to your spinner rigs in the same way. Again, make sure they are stretched out along the rig so they trail out on the retrieve. Choose the   largest and fattest worms available.

COLOUR

The spinner rig can be purchased at a local tackle shop and comes in many variations of size and  colors.

A simple rule to remember when faced with color choices is: bright days + clear water = silver spinner is a very good choice.  Darker water or cloudy days try a fluorescent or gold spinner are other good choices

The beads most often used are red with white, or yellow; try mixing the colors until you come up with the pattern that works best for you.

SPEED.

Try slow trolling or retrieving the leech at a fairly fast pace at first to take advantage of more aggressive fish.   Remember that you should troll according the weather system.

29

Meaning:
Bright, clear day:  troll slow or even jig
Cloudy, rainy day:  Troll faster and a willow leaf blade is a very good choice

A rate of about half again the normal trolling speed usually works well.  Keep track of where the fish are hitting and come back over these same spots again but a little slower this time to take   advantage of the less aggressive fish. Remember that it is not always the larger fish that are most aggressive and by fishing back you can add considerably to your stringer.

CASTING

Having reached the place you are going to fish, maybe a shoal or weed bed that you have had some luck on before, try fan casting. Start at a right angle to where you are standing facing the water. Throw the first cast to the right and keep working  to the left until you have gone in a complete arch to the other end. This will allow you to cover every bit of the water facing you. Now move down until you are at the edge of the spot you covered last and start the same procedure over again. When you have worked your way to the end of the area that you wanted to fish, you will have covered the area correctly.

Inlets are a good place to practice this pattern of casting, especially early season as the walleye are quite often in this area looking for small, early baitfish or crustaceans. By fan casting you can cover this entire area of water.

The above methods have consistently proven to be successful for opening season walleye.   So get your live bait and be ready for a fun day on the lake.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

How to Build a Worm Farm

A worm farm is used as a means of naturally creating fertilization for planting and gardening. Worms are good at breaking down waste matter quickly into rich organic compost.

342x316xWorm-Farm_gif_pagespeed_ic_fLRfWeXSZ1
The components for making one are very much basic and can be more likely be found lying around somewhere in your home so making a worm farm is very simple.

Tools required

  • Gloves
  • Boots
  • Shovel

Materials required

  • Worms
  • Waste (Trash such as kitchen waste, vegetable scraps etc.)
  • Container (such as a bin or otherwise)
  • Top soil
  • Water

Instructions

  1. Most persons prefer to buy the worms however other persons source them elsewhere. Wherever you find it most fit to source your worms is up to you. A pound of worms usually equates to 1,000 worms.
  2. Prepare all your garbage and waste matters and dig a hole with your shovel to put the container in allowing the opening to stay at the top. Make sure the container has some holes as drainage.
  3. When everything is lined up and ready place all the dirt and waste into your worm farm container and use water to saturate the contents then put in all the worms. Close the lid tightly to keep other things out of it.
  4. Wait a couple weeks for the waste to decompose then check the bin for the changes in the compost.
  5. Now you can use the compost from the worm farm as you like for planting and gardening.

Tips and Warning

  • Red worms are most commonly used for worm farms because they consume a lot and optimize the waste matter so they are normally seen as a good investment. Another good option of worms are tiger worms.
  • An old fridge or freezer (that can be closed) can be used as your container for your worm farm; however the main components such as the coils and compressor should be removed before using it. These parts contain chemicals that can escape and poison the earth.
  • The contents of a worm farm can also be used as fish bait when fishing.
  • Do not allow the dirt in the worm farm to get too dry, this will cause the worms to move downwards and slow down the decomposition process.
  • Worm farms help persons to save money, instead of purchasing fertilizers which can be expensive and non-organic that may be harmful to the environment they can make and use cheap organic waste.
  • Because you will be handling all types of dirt and waste matter, it is advised that once you are building a worm farm you always have on the right clothing such as gloves and right shoes this protects you from bacteria and infection.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 
 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Using Leeches & Worms + VIDEO

 LEECHES AND NIGHTCRAWLERS

walleye_catchLeeches and night-crawlers are favorite foods of the walleye because they are natural offerings in most waters and walleye are accustomed to feeding on them.

When presented properly they are irresistible. A stretched out, wiggling leech bouncing  along just over the bottom of a gravel bar or weed bed, will make even the most finicky walleye take a second look, turn around and zero in on target,   mouth open and taste buds tingling.

Hook the sucker end of the leech to the first hook of a spinner rig and place the tail section on the last hook. Place it in the water and pull it at the same speed you are   going to troll or retrieve at and look for the size, movement and or roll of the leech. It should run straight not roll up into a nondescript little ball; this does not attract walleye. When you have the leech trailing the way you want it’s time to add a few light split shots to get it down to the desired depth. By placing the split shot about eighteen inches to two feet in front of the hook you should be within six inches of bottom with the leech as you troll or retrieve, and you won’t have to run a whole lot of line out behind the boat.

Night-crawlers are attached to your spinner rigs in the same way. Again, make sure they are stretched out along the rig so they trail out on the retrieve. Choose the   largest and fattest worms available.

COLOUR

The spinner rig can be purchased at a local tackle shop and comes in many variations of size and  colors.

A simple rule to remember when faced with color choices is: bright days + clear water = silver spinner is a very good choice.  Darker water or cloudy days try a fluorescent or gold spinner are other good choices

The beads most often used are red with white, or yellow; try mixing the colors until you come up with the pattern that works best for you.

SPEED.

Try slow trolling or retrieving the leech at a fairly fast pace at first to take advantage of more aggressive fish.   Remember that you should troll according the weather system.

Meaning:
Bright, clear day:  troll slow or even jig
Cloudy, rainy day:  Troll faster and a willow leaf blade is a very good choice

A rate of about half again the normal trolling speed usually works well.  Keep track of where the fish are hitting and come back over these same spots again but a little slower this time to take   advantage of the less aggressive fish. Remember that it is not always the larger fish that are most aggressive and by fishing back you can add considerably to your stringer.

CASTING

Having reached the place you are going to fish, maybe a shoal or weed bed that you have had some luck on before, try fan casting. Start at a right angle to where you are standing facing the water. Throw the first cast to the right and keep working  to the left until you have gone in a complete arch to the other end. This will allow you to cover every bit of the water facing you. Now move down until you are at the edge of the spot you covered last and start the same procedure over again. When you have worked your way to the end of the area that you wanted to fish, you will have covered the area correctly.

Inlets are a good place to practice this pattern of casting, especially early season as the walleye are quite often in this area looking for small, early baitfish or crustaceans. By fan casting you can cover this entire area of water.

The above methods have consistently proven to be successful for opening season walleye.   So get your live bait and be ready for a fun day on the lake.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

How to Build a Worm Farm

A worm farm is used as a means of naturally creating fertilization for planting and gardening. Worms are good at breaking down waste matter quickly into rich organic compost.

342x316xWorm-Farm_gif_pagespeed_ic_fLRfWeXSZ1
The components for making one are very much basic and can be more likely be found lying around somewhere in your home so making a worm farm is very simple.

Tools required

  • Gloves
  • Boots
  • Shovel

Materials required

  • Worms
  • Waste (Trash such as kitchen waste, vegetable scraps etc.)
  • Container (such as a bin or otherwise)
  • Top soil
  • Water

Instructions

  1. Most persons prefer to buy the worms however other persons source them elsewhere. Wherever you find it most fit to source your worms is up to you. A pound of worms usually equates to 1,000 worms.
  2. Prepare all your garbage and waste matters and dig a hole with your shovel to put the container in allowing the opening to stay at the top. Make sure the container has some holes as drainage.
  3. When everything is lined up and ready place all the dirt and waste into your worm farm container and use water to saturate the contents then put in all the worms. Close the lid tightly to keep other things out of it.
  4. Wait a couple weeks for the waste to decompose then check the bin for the changes in the compost.
  5. Now you can use the compost from the worm farm as you like for planting and gardening.

Tips and Warning

  • Red worms are most commonly used for worm farms because they consume a lot and optimize the waste matter so they are normally seen as a good investment. Another good option of worms are tiger worms.
  • An old fridge or freezer (that can be closed) can be used as your container for your worm farm; however the main components such as the coils and compressor should be removed before using it. These parts contain chemicals that can escape and poison the earth.
  • The contents of a worm farm can also be used as fish bait when fishing.
  • Do not allow the dirt in the worm farm to get too dry, this will cause the worms to move downwards and slow down the decomposition process.
  • Worm farms help persons to save money, instead of purchasing fertilizers which can be expensive and non-organic that may be harmful to the environment they can make and use cheap organic waste.
  • Because you will be handling all types of dirt and waste matter, it is advised that once you are building a worm farm you always have on the right clothing such as gloves and right shoes this protects you from bacteria and infection.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Using Leeches & Worms + VIDEO

 LEECHES AND NIGHTCRAWLERS

walleye_catchLeeches and night-crawlers are favorite foods of the walleye because they are natural offerings in most waters and walleye are accustomed to feeding on them.

When presented properly they are irresistible. A stretched out, wiggling leech bouncing  along just over the bottom of a gravel bar or weed bed, will make even the most finicky walleye take a second look, turn around and zero in on target,   mouth open and taste buds tingling.

Hook the sucker end of the leech to the first hook of a spinner rig and place the tail section on the last hook. Place it in the water and pull it at the same speed you are   going to troll or retrieve at and look for the size, movement and or roll of the leech. It should run straight not roll up into a nondescript little ball; this does not attract walleye. When you have the leech trailing the way you want it’s time to add a few light split shots to get it down to the desired depth. By placing the split shot about eighteen inches to two feet in front of the hook you should be within six inches of bottom with the leech as you troll or retrieve, and you won’t have to run a whole lot of line out behind the boat.

Night-crawlers are attached to your spinner rigs in the same way. Again, make sure they are stretched out along the rig so they trail out on the retrieve. Choose the   largest and fattest worms available.

COLOUR

The spinner rig can be purchased at a local tackle shop and comes in many variations of size and  colors.

A simple rule to remember when faced with color choices is: bright days + clear water = silver spinner is a very good choice.  Darker water or cloudy days try a fluorescent or gold spinner are other good choices

The beads most often used are red with white, or yellow; try mixing the colors until you come up with the pattern that works best for you.

SPEED.

Try slow trolling or retrieving the leech at a fairly fast pace at first to take advantage of more aggressive fish.   Remember that you should troll according the weather system.

Meaning:
Bright, clear day:  troll slow or even jig
Cloudy, rainy day:  Troll faster and a willow leaf blade is a very good choice

A rate of about half again the normal trolling speed usually works well.  Keep track of where the fish are hitting and come back over these same spots again but a little slower this time to take   advantage of the less aggressive fish. Remember that it is not always the larger fish that are most aggressive and by fishing back you can add considerably to your stringer.

CASTING

Having reached the place you are going to fish, maybe a shoal or weed bed that you have had some luck on before, try fan casting. Start at a right angle to where you are standing facing the water. Throw the first cast to the right and keep working  to the left until you have gone in a complete arch to the other end. This will allow you to cover every bit of the water facing you. Now move down until you are at the edge of the spot you covered last and start the same procedure over again. When you have worked your way to the end of the area that you wanted to fish, you will have covered the area correctly.

Inlets are a good place to practice this pattern of casting, especially early season as the walleye are quite often in this area looking for small, early baitfish or crustaceans. By fan casting you can cover this entire area of water.

The above methods have consistently proven to be successful for opening season walleye.   So get your live bait and be ready for a fun day on the lake.

Follow our HUNTING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 38,127 other followers

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
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